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Direct Instruction Facilitative Teaching

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Teaches students how to learn on their own without the direct control of the teacher. ... Seek relationships, draw logical inferences. State the hypothesis ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Direct Instruction Facilitative Teaching


1
Direct Instruction/ Facilitative Teaching
  • EDEL 413
  • CSUB
  • B.Gibbons, M.A.

2
Direct Instruction
  • Expository instruction
  • Describes lessons in which the teacher transmits
    information directly to students, structuring
    class time to reach a clearly defined set of
    objectives as efficiently as possible.

3
Direct Instruction
  • Learning goals are clearly stated.
  • Extensive content coverage.
  • Student performance is closely monitored.
  • Immediate feedback is given to students.
  • Teacher is in control of the lesson.

4
Direct Instruction
  • Four instructional strategies
  • Clinical Instruction
  • Advance Organization
  • Concept Attainment
  • Mastery Learning

5
Clinical Instruction
6
Clinical Instruction
  • Effective for teaching information and basic
    skills.
  • Tends to emphasize low levels of thought.
  • Can become boring for students.

7
Advance Organization
  • Helps students connect prior knowledge with
    knowledge they are about to learn.
  • Provides organizers (conceptual bridges) which
    provide a framework upon which students can build
    learning.

8
Advance Organization
  • Steps of lesson presentation
  • Selection and presentation of the organizer.
  • Presentation of new material.
  • Classification of the linkages between the
    organizer and new material.

9
Advance Organization
  • Teacher selects and presents the most effective
    organizer so that students understand its
    usefulness.
  • Useful in cognitive learning, where students need
    to make sense of new information.

10
Advance Organization
  • Promotes acquisition and retention of large
    quantities of information.
  • Students active role promotes critical and
    analytical thinking and assists in the
    integration of knowledge.

11
Concept Attainment
  • Process by which we acquire and refine concepts.
  • CONCEPT a general idea we have about a certain
    thing, by combining the objects perceived
    characteristics.
  • Compare and contrast examples.
  • Categorize objects and ideas based on attributes.

12
Concept Attainment
  • Teacher gives students EXEMPLARS and then asks
    students to develop and test hypotheses about
    them.
  • Teachers and students analyze the thinking
    process used.
  • Valuable when introducing a concept.
  • Time consuming.

13
Mastery Learning
  • Belief that all students can learn well, given
    proper instruction and adequate time.
  • No student is allowed to move on to the next
    segment until the previous segment has been
    mastered.
  • Tutoring and extra help required.
  • Material is divided into small parts.

14
Mastery Learning
  • Each student is carefully monitored.
  • Requires a great deal of planning, because each
    student is working at their own level.
  • Advantageous for lower students, because they
    experience success.
  • Students may find it boring.

15
Facilitative Teaching
  • Students are encouraged to explore problems and
    come up with their own solutions.
  • Students have more input into lessons.
  • Teacher facilitates students efforts and
    progress.
  • Less lecturing and directing.
  • Teacher Guide on the side.

16
Facilitative Teaching
  • Three instructional strategies
  • Inquiry
  • Projects
  • Cooperative Learning

17
Inquiry
  • Purpose is to teach students how to learn on
    their own Problem-solve.
  • Students explore topics, find information, reach
    conclusions.
  • Students assume responsibility for their
    learning.

18
Inquiry
  • Teacher may present topics, but students decide
    how they will gather, verify, and interpret
    information.
  • They must compose an explanation of their
    conclusions.
  • Teaches students how to learn on their own
    without the direct control of the teacher.
  • Process is time consuming.

19
Process of Inquiry
  • Defining the problem. Kern River Pollution
  • Make it meaningful
  • Make it manageable.
  • Developing a tentative answer.
  • (Paper mill, Hart Park trash, homes on river)
  • Collect, examine, and classify data.
  • Seek relationships, draw logical inferences.
  • State the hypothesis

20
Process of Inquiry
  • Testing the Tentative Answer
  • Arranging data
  • Interpreting data
  • Classifying data
  • Developing a Conclusion
  • Finding patterns or relationships
  • Stating the conclusion

21
Process of Inquiry
  • Applying the Conclusion
  • Testing against new evidence.
  • Generalizing about the results.
  • Scientific Method

22
Handout DI and Inquiry Case Studies
  • Read aloud of handout.
  • With a partner, discuss an inquiry lesson in a
    content area other than math.
  • Share with the class.
  • Assign. 7 Inquiry Lesson Plan

23
Projects
  • Activities carried out over longer periods of
    time.
  • Result in a product such as a model, paper,
    drawing or performance.
  • Helps put students in control of their own
    learning.
  • Enables students to plan on a large scale and
    carry out plans to fruition.
  • Requires a great deal of time.

24
Resolving Nondisciplinary Problems and Conflicts
  • Mr. Crane Has a Messy Classroom, p. 123
  • Mr. Muellers First-Graders Are Slow to Enter the
    Room and Settle Down, p. 127
  • Profanity Abounds in Miss Wellborns Sixth-Grade
    Class, p. 128
  • Jonathan is Being Scapegoated in Geometry Class,
    p. 129
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