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Texas Southern University Research Week

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TSU 3-31-08. Office of Proposal Development, Texas A&M University. 14. The RFP as Treasure Map ... The National Science Foundation. TSU 3-31-08 ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Texas Southern University Research Week


1
Texas Southern UniversityResearch Week
  • A panel presentation on grant writing by the
  • Office of Proposal Development
  • Office of Research Graduate Studies
  • Texas AM University
  • Mike Cronan, Grant Writing Overview
  • Lucy Deckard, National Science Foundation
  • John Ivy, Life Sciences Funding (NIH, NSF)
  • Robyn Pearson, Soc. Sci., Ed., Humanities
  • Jean Ann Bowman, Earth, Environ., Agr.

2
Office of Proposal Development
  • Supports faculty in the development and writing
    of research and educational proposals to federal
    agencies and foundations--
  • Center-level initiatives,
  • Interdisciplinary research teams,
  • New junior faculty,
  • Institutional diversity initiatives,
  • Health Science Center collaborations,
  • Multi-institutional research partnerships.
  • Offers a full suite of grant writing training
    programs to help faculty develop and write more
    competitive proposals.

3
See OPDs Webpage for This Seminar
  • For an electronic version of this presentation
  • For more information on
  • How to write a proposal
  • How to find funding opportunities
  • NSF
  • NIH
  • Education and Social Sciences
  • Humanities
  • Programs for Junior Faculty
  • http//opd.tamu.edu/seminar-materials/seminar-mate
    rials-by-date/march-31-2008-presentations-for-tsu-
    research-week.html

4
OPD Member List
  • Jean Ann Bowman, PhD (Physical Geography/Hydrology
    ), earth, ecological, environmental,
    jbowman_at_tamu.edu
  • Libby Childress, Scheduling, workshop management,
    project coordination, libbyc_at_tamu.edu
  • Mike Cronan, PE, BS (Civil/Structures), BA, MFA,
    Center-level proposals, research and educational
    partnerships, new proposal and training
    initiatives, mikecronan_at_tamu.edu
  • Lucy Deckard, BS (Materials), MS (Materials), New
    faculty initiative, fellowships,
    engineering/physical science proposals, equipment
    and instrumentation, l-deckard_at_tamu.edu
  • John Ivy, PhD (Molecular Biology), NIH biomedical
    and biological science initiatives,
    johnivy_at_tamu.edu
  • Phyllis McBride, PhD (English), proposal writing
    training, biomedical, editing,
    p-mcbride_at_tamu.edu
  • Robyn Pearson, BA, MA (Anthropology), social
    sciences and humanities proposals, editing and
    rewriting, rlpearson_at_tamu.edu
  • http//opd.tamu.edu/

5
Generic Strategies for Writing Competitive
Proposals
  • Identifying funding solicitations
  • Analyzing the solicitation
  • Analyzing the funding agency
  • Understanding the review process
  • Writing the proposal narrative

6
If you dont write grants, you wont get any
  • Target the proposal at the intersection where
  • research dollars are available
  • your research interests are met
  • a competitive proposal can be written within the
    time available.

7
OPD-Web Funding Opportunities
8
Focus on your research interests
9
Request for Proposals (RFP)
  • One starting point of the proposal writing
    process.
  • Other starting points include investigator-initiat
    ed (unsolicited) proposals, white papers, and
    quad charts.

10
Program Solicitation, RFP
  • The solicitation represents an invitation by a
    funding agency for applicants to submit requests
    for funding in research areas of interest to the
    agency or foundation.
  • The RFP is not a menu or smorgasbord offering the
    applicant a choice of addressing some topics but
    not others, depending on interest, or some review
    criteria but not others.
  • The RFP is a non-negotiable listing of
    performance expectations reflecting the stated
    goals, objectives, and desired outcomes of the
    agency.

11
Reviewing the RFP
  • Clarify ambiguities if unresolved
  • Get clarification from a program officer.
  • Ambiguities needs to be resolved prior to
    proposal writing so the proposal narrative maps
    to the guidelines with informed certainty.

12
Role in Proposal Organization
  • Use the RFP to develop the structure, order, and
    detail of the proposal narrative.
  • Use the RFP as an organizational template during
    proposal development to help ensure every RFP
    requirement is addressed fully.

13
Never be timid about contacting a program officer
for clarification
  • Timidity is never rewarded in the competitive
    grant process.

14
The RFP as Treasure Map
  • Follow directions
  • Review step by step
  • Understand it
  • Understood by all PIs
  • Keep focused
  • Dont wander off path
  • Use the RFP as an organizational template during
    proposal development to ensure every requirement
    is addressed fully in the proposal narrative.

15
Analyzing the funding agency
  • Analyzing the mission, strategic plan, investment
    priorities, and culture of a funding agency
    provides information key to enhancing proposal
    competitiveness.

16
Know what was recently funded
  • Learning about recently funded research in your
    area helps you understand what an agency is
    looking for in the review process
  • Review abstracts of funded proposals on agency
    web sites
  • Talk to the principal investigators of funded
    proposals in your area
  • Obtain copies of funded proposals
  • Ask the PI
  • Ask the agency (funded proposals are public)

17
You must intrigue the reviewers
18
The funded proposal
  • The author of a funded proposal has
    accomplished the basic goal of grant writing
  • Ensured the reviewers were intrigued and excited
    about the proposed research,
  • Understood its significance, and
  • Were confident in the researchers capacity to
    perform.

19
Make Clear to Reviewers
  • What you propose to do?
  • Why it is it important?
  • Why are you able to do it?
  • How will you do it?
  • How does it contribute to the interests and
    objectives of the agency and program?
  • Ensured the reviewers were intrigued and excited
    about the proposed research,
  • Understood its significance, and
  • Were confident in your capacity to perform.

20
Narrative Detail
  • Agencies will not fund an idea not embedded in
    a convincing pattern of narrative detail and
    performance specificity tightly mapped to funding
    agency objectives.

21
Role of the Proposal Narrative
  • Helps incubate ideas, concepts, connections
    details
  • Synthesizes ideas and detail
  • Connects ideas to performance details
  • Develops order, logic, transitions, and
    connectedness
  • Helps the timing, logistics, and collaborations
    of proposal development
  • Integrates collaborators ideas
  • Provides a common structure to meld disciplinary
    strands
  • Makes ideas accessible to others
  • Converges on a common language
  • A competitive narrative requires persistence,
    continuous revisions, and many draft iterations
    to converge on perfection

22
The proposal is the only reality
  • A proposal is not unlike a novel or a movie. It
    creates its own, self-contained reality. The
    proposal contains all the funding agency and
    review panel will know about your capabilities
    and your capacity to perform. With few
    exceptions, an agency bases its decision to fund
    or not fund entirely on the proposal and the
    persuasive reality it creates.

23
The National Science Foundation
24
NSF Culture and MissionStrategic Goals, 2006 -
2011
  • Discovery
  • Advance frontiers of knowledge
  • Emphasize areas of greatest opportunity and
    potential benefit
  • Establish nation as global leader in transforming
    science and education
  • Learning
  • Cultivate a world-class, broadly inclusive SE
    workforce
  • Expand scientific literacy of all citizens

25
NSF Strategic Goals (contd)
  • Research Infrastructure
  • Build nations research capability through
    investments in advanced instrumentation,
    facilities, cyberinfrastructure and experimental
    tools
  • Stewardship
  • Support excellence in science and engineering
    research and education through a capable and
    responsive organization

26
NSF Overarching Themes
  • Integration of research and education
  • Infuse education with excitement of discovery
    and enrich research through diversity of learning
    perspectives.
  • Integrating diversity into NSF programs, projects
    and activities
  • Participation of all citizens women and men
    underrepresented minorities persons with
    disabilities.

27
NSF Structure
  • Divided into directorates
  • Biological Sciences (BIO)
  • Computer and Information Science and Eng (CISE)
  • Education and Human Resources (EHR)
  • Engineering (ENG)
  • Geosciences (GEO)
  • Mathematical and Physical Sciences (MPS)
  • Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (SBE)
  • Office of Polar Programs (OPP)
  • Each directorate divided into divisions and
    programs -see http//www.nsf.gov/staff/orglist.jsp
  • Submit most proposals to specific disciplinary
    program
  • Also cross-cutting programs

28
NSF Culture
  • Each directorate has its own culture and
    priorities
  • Get to know the directorates and divisions that
    could fund your work
  • Read web site goals, priorities of directorate,
    division, programs
  • Get to know program directors
  • Use funded programs data base to find out what
    has been funded recently - http//www.nsf.gov/awar
    dsearch/index.jsp
  • Volunteer to serve as reviewer
  • Attend NSF national and regional workshops

29
Funding Opportunities
  • Helpful NSF web pages to search for funding
    opportunities
  • Guide to Programs
  • http//www.nsf.gov/funding/browse_all_funding.jsp
  • About Funding http//www.nsf.gov/funding/aboutf
    unding.jsp
  • Active Funding Opportunities (by due date)
  • http//www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_list.jsp?orgNSFor
    drcnt
  • Award Search http//www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/index.
    jsp

30
Types of Funding Opportunities Unsolicited
  • Program Description or Program Announcement
    (unsolicited)
  • Administered by disciplinary programs within
    directorate and division
  • Typically due once or twice per year (sometimes
    due dates sometimes target dates or
    windows) 1 3 PIs
  • Follow Grant Proposal Guide (GPG) for formatting,
    eligibility, etc.
  • http//www.nsf.gov/pubs/policydocs/pappguide/nsf08
    _1/gpg_index.jsp
  • Synopsis of research interests and abstracts of
    funded proposals on web site

31
Types of Funding OpportunitiesSolicited
  • Solicitation or Request for Proposal (RFP)
  • More focused than program announcements
  • Often tied to particular agency initiative
  • NSF-wide and cross-cutting opportunities
  • Often apply for limited period of time
  • Give specific format, criteria and other
    requirements that may differ from GPG

32
Types of Funding OpportunitiesOther Types
  • Dear Colleague Letter
  • Informs proposer community of upcoming
    opportunities, special competition for
    supplements, etc.
  • SGER (Special Grants for Exploratory Research)
  • Small-scale, high-risk exploratory research
  • 200K or less
  • Approved by program officer (talk to program
    officer before submitting!)
  • This mechanism may change

33
Funding Opportunities
  • In addition to research grants, NSF funds
  • Instrumentation
  • Conferences and Workshops
  • Doctoral Research in Selected Areas (Doctoral
    Dissertation Improvement Grants)
  • International Travel
  • Supplements to existing grants

34
NSF Education Programs Examples
  • Course, Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement
    (CCLI)
  • http//www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id5
    741orgNSFsel_orgNSFfromfund
  • NSF Scholarships in Science, Technology,
    Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM)
  • http//www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id5
    257orgNSFsel_orgNSFfromfund
  • Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU)
  • http//www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id5
    517orgNSFsel_orgNSFfromfund
  • Advanced Technological Education (ATE)
  • http//www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id5
    464orgNSFsel_orgNSFfromfund
  • Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
    Talent Expansion Program (STEP)
  • http//www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id5
    488orgDUEfromhome
  • Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering
    and Mathematics (S-STEM)
  • http//www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id52
    57orgDUEfromhome

35
NSF Programs Specifically for MSIs
  • Centers of Research Excellence in Science and
    Technology (CREST)
  • HBCU Research Infrastructure for Science and
    Engineering (HBCU-RISE)
  • http//www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id6
    668orgNSFsel_orgNSFfromfund
  • Historically Black College and Universities
    Undergraduate Program (HBCU-RISE)
  • http//www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id5
    481orgNSFsel_orgNSFfromfund

36
Review Process
  • May be ad hoc or panel review (at least three
    reviewers)
  • Proposal rated
  • Excellent, Very good, Good, Fair, Poor
  • Comments included as feedback
  • NSF tries to return reviews within 6 months of
    due date

37
Performance ExpectationsReview Criteria
  • Intellectual Merit
  • How important is the proposed activity to
    advancing knowledge and understanding within its
    own field or across different fields?
  • How well qualified is the proposer (individual or
    team) to conduct the project?
  • To what extent does the proposed activity suggest
    and explore creative and original concepts?
  • How well conceived and organized is the proposed
    activity?
  • Is there sufficient access to resources?

38
Review Criteria
  • Broader Impacts
  • Advance discovery while promoting teaching,
    training and learning
  • Broaden participation of under-rep. groups
  • Dissemination
  • Societal benefits
  • Improve infrastructure for research
  • Discuss throughout proposal AND in separate
    section in both Project Summary and Description
  • Special Criteria
  • Program specific
  • Listed in solicitation under Proposal Review
    Information
  • Provide program director with nuggets

39
Points to Emphasize
  • State benefits of your research clearly
  • Why is it important and how is it novel?
  • How will it advance knowledge in field?
  • Societal benefits
  • Research Plan should be specific and detailed
  • Clearly state measurable goals and outcomes
  • Discuss how you will address any possible
    problems
  • Be sure to emphasize integration of education and
    research
  • Measurable goals (e.g., number of students,
    diversity goals, etc.)
  • Connect to existing NSF projects if possible

40
For More Information on NSF
  • Resources for NSF
  • http//opd.tamu.edu/proposal-resources/resources-f
    or-nsf.html
  • Toolkit for NSF
  • http//opd.tamu.edu/the-craft-of-writing-workbook
    /toolkit-for-nsf
  • Longer presentation on NSF
  • http//opd.tamu.edu/seminar-materials/seminar-mat
    erials-by-date/november-7-2007-graduate-student-se
    minar.html

41
Life Sciences Funding
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Science Foundation
  • and elsewhere

42
Life Sciences a diverse category
  • Biology
  • Biomedicine
  • Health disparities
  • Behavior
  • Biochemistry
  • Computational science
  • Interdisciplinary studies

43
Many categories of funding
  • Research
  • Training
  • Fellowship
  • Student retention-recruitment
  • Diversity
  • Outreach
  • Curriculum
  • Loan reimbursement

44
Funding Sources
  • National Institutes of Health 29 bill.
  • National Science Foundation 6 bill.
  • Dept. of Health Human Services
  • Department of Defense
  • Foundations
  • Environmental Protection Agency
  • US Department of Agriculture
  • National Aeronautics Space Admin.

45
NSF Biological Sciences Directorate
  • The mission of the Directorate for Biological
    Sciences (BIO) is to enable discoveries for
    understanding life. BIO-supported research
    advances the frontiers of biological knowledge,
    increases our understanding of complex systems,
    and provides a theoretical basis for original
    research in many other scientific disciplines.
  • NSF supports fundamental research in science and
    engineering, except for the medical sciences

46
NSF Biological Sciences Directorate - Divisions
  • Biological Infrastructure
  • Environmental Biology
  • Emerging Frontiers
  • Integrative Organismal Systems
  • Molecular Cellular Biosciences

47
NIH Mission
  • NIH is the steward of medical and behavioral
    research for the Nation. Its mission is
  • science in pursuit of fundamental knowledge about
    the nature and behavior of living systems and
  • the application of that knowledge to extend
    healthy life and reduce the burdens of illness
    and disability.

48
NIH 20 Institutes, 7 Centers
49
National Institutes of Health
  • NIH is a basic research agency
  • Each Institute has its own mission
  • Each Institute has its own budget
  • Each Institute has its own activities
  • Each Institute has its own ways of doing things
  • When youre planning to submit a grant, check
    with Program Officers from different institutes
    to determine their specific policies and interest
    in your science.

50
Identify NIH Funding Opportunities
  • NIH Office of Extramural Research
  • http//grants1.nih.gov/grants/oer.htm
  • http//grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/index.html
  • Search by keyword
  • Browse by Requests for Applications (RFAs)
  • Browse by Program Announcements (PAs)
  • Automatic funding alerts
  • Institutes and Centers (IC) homepages
  • Listed at http//www.nih.gov/icd
  • Go to IC homepage
  • Browse or search their Research Funding or
    "Extramural Funding section

51
NIH Funding Mechanisms
  • Three principal categories
  • Training T F
  • Career Development K
  • Research Project Grant R
  • R01, R03, R15, R21

52
NIH Career DevelopmentK Awards
  • Directed at retraining, professional career
    development, or recognition of career success
  • K Kioskhttp//grants1.nih.gov/training/careerdeve
    lopmentawards.htm
  • Career Award WizardHelps you select the right
    career awardhttp//grants.nih.gov/training/kwizar
    d/index.htm
  • Participation may be restricted to certain
    Institutes and Centers

53
NIH Research Program Grants
  • R01 Research Project Grant
  • R03 Small Research Grant
  • R21 Exploratory, Developmental Research Grant
  • R15 Academic and Research Enhancement Award
    (AREA) Grant

54
New Investigator Programhttp//grants.nih.gov/gra
nts/new_investigators/index.htm
55
Minority Opportunities in Research(MORE)
http//www.nigms.nih.gov/Minority/
  • National Institute of General Medical Sciences
  • Minority Access to Research Careers (MARC)
  • Minority Biomedical Research Support (MBRS)
  • MORE Special Initiative (SI)

56
CRISP http//crisp.cit.nih.gov/
  • Computer Retrieval of Informationon Scientific
    Projects
  • A searchable database of federally funded
    biomedical research
  • What similar projects have been funded?
  • Has someone already been funded to pursue my
    idea?
  • Who are my competitors?
  • Who are potential collaborators?

57
Speak with the Program Officer early and often
  • Do your homework first
  • Make an appointment
  • Listen to the response
  • Request clarification
  • Follow up

58
Know your NIH Review Criteria
  • Significance
  • Ability of the project to improve health or
    advance the field
  • Approach
  • Feasibility of methods and appropriateness of
    budget
  • Innovation
  • Originality of research
  • Investigator
  • Education, training, relevant experience
  • Environment
  • Suitability of facilities and institution support

59
Understand the NIH Review Process
  • Center for Scientific Review
  • Administers and coordinates peer review
  • Offers a video of a mock review session
  • Posts study section rosters
  • http//cms.csr.nih.gov/
  • Two-step Review process
  • Peer review is merit-based
  • Applications receive three individual reviews
  • Scores range from 100500
  • Written critiques provided to investigator
  • Advisory Council or Board
  • Meritorious proposals considered against mission,
    needs, and budget

60
Tips for Success with NIH Grants
  • Read the solicitation
  • Sign up for the Weekly NIH Funding Opportunities
    and Notices
  • Identify your "IC home"
  • Get to know your Program Officer
  • Study the "how-to" NIH websites
  • Develop a descriptive title
  • Write a concise, non-ambiguous Abstract/Summary
  • Write Specific Aims that are hypothesis-driven
    with clear, measurable outcomes

61
Web Resources
  • Office of Proposal Development,
    TAMUhttp//opd.tamu.edu/
  • Resources for Junior Facultyhttp//opd.tamu.edu/r
    esources-for-junior-faculty
  • Funding Opportunitieshttp//opd.tamu.edu/funding-
    opportunities
  • The Craft of Grant Writing workbookhttp//opd.tam
    u.edu/the-craft-of-writing-workbook
  • National Science Foundationhttp//www.nsf.gov/
  • Find Funding http//www.nsf.gov/funding/
  • Funded Research http//www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/

62
Web Resources
  • National Institutes of Health http//www.nih.gov/
  • Grant Application Basicshttp//grants.nih.gov/gra
    nts/grant_basics.htm
  • All About Grants Tutorialhttp//www.niaid.nih.gov
    /ncn/grants/default.htm
  • New Investigator Portalhttp//www.niaid.nih.gov/n
    cn/grants/new/portal.htm
  • Annotated R01 Research Plan and Summary
    Statementhttp//www.niaid.nih.gov/ncn/grants/app/
  • Mock Peer Review Videohttp//www.csr.nih.gov/Vide
    o/Video.asp
  • CRISP funded biomedical researchhttp//crisp.cit.
    nih.gov/

63
Web Resources
  • Grants.gov http//www.grants.gov
  • GrantsNet sponsored by AAAS and
    HHMI http//sciencecareers.sciencemag.org/funding
  • Congressionally Directed Medical Research
    Programs http//cdmrp.army.mil/funding/default.ht
    m
  • Philanthropy News Digest RFP listings http//found
    ationcenter.org/pnd/rfp/
  • American Cancer Society http//www.cancer.org/doc
    root/RES/RES_0.asp
  • American Heart Association http//www.americanhear
    t.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier9713
  • Cancer Research Institute http//www.cancerresear
    ch.org/criprogs.html
  • Life Sciences Research Foundation
    http//www.lsrf.org/geninfo.htm
  • National Multiple Sclerosis Society
    http//www.nationalmssociety.org/

64
Research Funding in Education, Social
Behavioral Sciences, and the Humanities
65
Department of Education (ED)
  • Mission to promote student achievement and
    preparation for global competitiveness by
    fostering educational excellence and ensuring
    equal access
  • Student loans
  • Formula grants non-competitive funds awarded to
    state agencies (i.e., title grants)
  • Discretionary grants based on a competitive
    review process

66
ED Principal Offices
  • Institute of Education Sciences (IES)
  • http//www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ies/index.htm
    l
  • Education practice and policy
  • Office of Elementary and Secondary Education
    (OESE)
  • http//www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/oese/index.ht
    ml
  • Promote academic excellence, access for all, and
    improve teaching learning
  • Office of English Language Acquisition (OELA)
  • http//www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/oela/index.ht
    ml
  • Attainment of English proficiency build
    capacity in critical foreign languages
  • Office of Innovation and Improvement (OII)
  • http//www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/oii/index.htm
    l
  • Parent programs, teacher quality, education
    improvement, and technology

67
ED Principal Offices
  • Office of Postsecondary Education (OPE)
  • http//www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ope/index.htm
    l
  • Increase access to postsecondary education
  • Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDFS)
  • http//www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/osdfs/index.h
    tml
  • Includes health and physical education programs
  • Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative
    Services (OSERS)
  • http//www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/osers/index.h
    tml
  • Improve education for people of all ages with
    disabilities
  • Office of Vocational and Adult Education (OVAE)
  • http//www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ovae/index.ht
    ml
  • Adult education and literacy with focus on
    community college programs

68
ED Resources
  • Grantmaking at ED
  • http//www.ed.gov/fund/grant/about/grantmaking/ind
    ex.html
  • Forecast of Funding Opportunities
  • http//www.ed.gov/fund/grant/find/edlite-forecast.
    html
  • Award database
  • http//www.ed.gov/fund/data/award/grntawd.html

69
How to Find ED Funding
  • Federal Register
  • http//www.ed.gov/news/fedregister/announce/index.
    html
  • FY 2007-08 Discretionary Grant Application
    Packages
  • http//www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/grantapps/index
    .html
  • Programs by Title, Subject, Eligibility
  • http//www.ed.gov/programs/find/title/index.html?s
    rcov
  • EDInfo
  • http//www.ed.gov/news/newsletters/index.html
  • 1-2 email messages a week describing federal
    teaching and learning resources and new ED
    funding opportunities

70
ED Review Process
  • Most reviewers are recruited and have expertise
    in the subject area(s)
  • Each proposal is divided into sections with a
    certain number of maximum points assigned per
    section, totaling 100 points
  • Each reviewer reads and scores a group of
    applications using selection criteria stated in
    the application package then scores are averaged
    and rank ordered
  • Sometimes scores will be standardized to
    compensate for extremely high/low scores
  • A high score does not guarantee funding
    geographic distribution requirements may limit
    awards in specific regions, or funding may be
    denied due to an applicants poor performance on
    previous federal awards

71
Federal Funding for Social Behavioral Sciences
  • National Science Foundation
  • Social, Behavioral Economic Sciences Funding
    Opportunities
  • http//www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_list.jsp?orgSBE
  • Crosscutting and NSF-wide Funding Opportunities
  • http//www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_list.jsp?typexcut
  • National Institutes of Health
  • Health disparities research, multidisciplinary
    programs, center-level initiatives

72
Federal Funding for Humanities
  • National Endowment for the Humanities
  • Fellowships 4200/mo for 6-12 months to produce
    scholarly work
  • http//www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/fellowships.h
    tml
  • Summer Stipends 6000 total for two months must
    be nominated by your institution
  • http//www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/stipends.html

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Federal Funding for Humanities
  • National Endowment for the Arts
  • Creative Writing Fellowships 25,000 for
    original prose or poetry
  • http//www.nea.gov/grants/apply/Lit/index.html
  • Translation Fellowships 10-20,000 for
    translation of prose, poetry, or drama into
    English
  • http//www.nea.gov/grants/apply/LitTranslation/ind
    ex.html
  • Both fellowships have strict eligibility
    requirements and are highly competitive.

74
Federal Funding for Humanities
  • Traditional Fulbright Scholar Program
  • http//www.cies.org/us_scholars/us_awards/
  • Grantees lecture and conduct research abroad in a
    wide variety of academic professional fields
  • Funding amounts vary by country and each country
    establishes the time period for grants

75
Federal Funding for Humanities
  • Kluge Fellowships
  • http//www.loc.gov/loc/kluge/fellowships/kluge.htm
    l
  • Administered by the Library of Congress
  • Promotes humanistic and social science research
    using the Library's collections
  • Interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, or
    multi-lingual research is particularly welcome
  • Among the collections available to researchers
    are the world's largest law library and
    outstanding multilingual collections of books and
    periodicals

76
Other Sources ofHumanities Funding
  • Harry Ransom Center, UT-Austin
  • http//www.hrc.utexas.edu/research/fellowships/
  • Supports scholarly research projects in all areas
    of the humanities
  • The Huntington Library
  • http//www.huntington.org/ResearchDiv/Fellowships.
    html
  • Long- and short-term awards for research in
    British and American history, literature, art
    history, and the history of science and medicine

77
Other Sources ofHumanities Funding
  • Hagley Museum Library
  • http//www.hagley.lib.de.us/grants.html
  • Short-term Grants-in-Aid and Fellowships to
    research their collection of manuscripts,
    photographs, books, and pamphlets documenting the
    history of American business and technology
  • Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
  • http//www.gilderlehrman.org/historians/fellowship
    1.html
  • For historians, short-term and research
    fellowships at one of five archives

78
Other Sources ofHumanities Funding
  • Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowships to
    Assist Research and Artistic Creation
  • http//www.gf.org/
  • In all fields except performing arts
  • The Newberry Library
  • http//www.newberry.org/research/felshp/fellowshom
    e.html
  • Long- and short-term fellowships in history and
    humanities disciplines

79
Other Sources ofHumanities Funding
  • American Council of Learned Societies
  • http//www.acls.org/grants/Default.aspx?id380lin
    kidentifieriditemid380
  • Fellowships and grants in more than a dozen
    programs for research in the humanities
    and related social sciences at the doctoral and
    postdoctoral levels
  • Notable programs Charles A. Ryskamp Research
    Fellowships, Digital Innovation Fellowships,
    Andrew W. Mellon Early Career Fellowships

80
Other Sources ofHumanities Funding
  • Stanford Humanities Center External Faculty
    Fellowships
  • http//shc.stanford.edu/fellowships/external_fac.h
    tm
  • Supports research projects in the humanities,
    including history, philosophy, languages,
    literature, linguistics, archeology,
    jurisprudence, history and criticism of the arts,
    ethics, comparative religion, and those aspects
    of the social sciences employing historical or
    philosophical approaches

81
Other Sources ofHumanities Funding
  • The Heitt Prize in the Humanities
  • http//www.dallasinstitute.org/Programs/Spring202
    008/Hiett2008frames.htm
  • Administered by The Dallas Institute of
    Humanities and Culture
  • Presented to a person whose work in the
    humanities shows extraordinary promise and has a
    significant public component related to
    contemporary culture.

82
How to Find Humanities Funding
  • OPDs Funding for the Humanities
  • http//opd.tamu.edu/funding-opportunities/funding-
    opportunities-by-category/funding-for-the-humaniti
    es.html
  • TAMUs Glasscock Center for Humanities Research
    External Funding
  • http//glasscock.tamu.edu/Funding_Opportunities/ex
    ternalfunding.html
  • Institute of Museum Library Services
  • http//www.imls.gov/
  • H-Net Online
  • http//www.h-net.org/announce/group.cgi?typeFundi
    ng
  • Art Residencies Grants
  • http//artgrants.blogspot.com/

83
Earth, Environmental, Ecological and Agricultural
Research Funding
84
Mission Agencies
  • Government agencies with specific mission
  • Employ scientists scholars who conduct research
    to address the mission and needs of the agency
  • Intramural research vs. Extramural research
  • Annual budget mainly for Intramural research
  • Extramural research funds used to supplement
    agency mission and intramural research activities

85
Earth Mission Agencies
  • US Department of Agriculture (USDA)
  • US Department of Energy (DOE)
  • US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
  • National Aeronautics Space Administration
    (NASA)
  • National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration
    (NOAA)
  • National Science Foundation

86
US Department of Agriculture
  • Mission
  • Expand and develop markets
  • Food safety, nutrition, and health
  • Manage, protect public private lands
  • Funding Programs Priorities
  • National Research Initiative (www.csrees.usda.gov)
  • Natural resources, pest management, invasive
    species management
  • Basic and applied research, Integrated research,
    Equipment and instrumentation, Young investigator
    funding, Workshops
  • Challenge Grants for Postsecondary Education
  • Minority Serving Institution Programs

87
US Department of Energy
  • Mission
  • Advance national energy security
  • Promote scientific technological innovation
  • Funding Programs Priorities
  • Office of Energy Efficiency Renewable Energy
  • Solar, Wind, Geothermal, Hydroelectric
  • Office of Environmental Management
  • Reclamation of mined lands, Nuclear energy safety
  • Office of Science
  • Biological Environmental research, Climate
    change, Advanced computing
  • http//scalerts.science.energy.gov

88
US Environmental Protection Agency
  • Mission
  • To protect human health and the environment
  • Funding Programs Priorities
  • Environmental Education
  • Environmental Justice
  • Science to Achieve Results (STAR)
  • Water quality research
  • Air quality research
  • Effects of pollution on human health
  • www.epa.gov/ncer/grants
  • Undergraduate and graduate research fellowships

89
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
  • Mission
  • Explore universe, search for life
  • Understand and protect Earth
  • Inspire next generation of explorers
  • Funding Programs Priorities
  • Earth Space Sciences (ROSES)
  • Biological Physical Science
  • Space Flight Aerospace Technology
  • Education and Equal Opportunity
  • http//nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations

90
National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration
  • Mission
  • Research global oceans, atmosphere
  • Science, Service Stewardship
  • Funding Programs Priorities
  • Atmospheric research (storms, air quality)
  • Climate research (climate change, El Niño)
  • Oceans and Coastal research (ocean circulation)
  • Educational programs to train future NOAA
    workforce
  • Minority Serving Institution programs

91
Mission Agencies Identifying Research
Opportunities
  • Automatic Notifications
  • Agency listservs
  • Grants.gov
  • Agency Websites
  • NASA INSPIRES
  • http//nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations
  • NOAA
  • http//www.ofa.noaa.gov
  • EPA
  • http//www.epa.gov.ogd
  • Agency newsletters, reports, publications

92
Mission Agencies Funding and Review
  • Funding Cycles
  • Varies by agency and within agency
  • Ranges from one-time only solicitations to 36
    months
  • Proposal Review Procedures
  • Individual reviewers, panel reviews, agency
    reviews
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