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System Leadership for School Transformation Deans Lecture Faculty of Education, University of Melbou

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Shortages of high-qualified school leader candidates. ... Raising the Bar and Narrowing the Gap. Source: OECD (2001) Knowledge and Skills for Life ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: System Leadership for School Transformation Deans Lecture Faculty of Education, University of Melbou


1
The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and
Development Review of School Leadership
Presentation made at the NUT Conference
on The Future of School Leadership London,
Tuesday 1st May 2007
Professor David HopkinsHSBC Chair of
International Leadership
2
Today I will speak about.
  • Why school leadership is important at the
    policy level
  • What is the focus of the OECD study on school
    leadership
  • How we are contributing on the issue of system
    leadership

3
Why is it important?
  • Rising expectations of schools and schooling
    (knowledge economy, globalisation, migration,
    decentralisation)
  • Greater accountability for schools and principals
  • From teachers with additional responsibilities to
    full time managers of human and financial
    resources
  • Instructional leadership
  • Staff evaluation
  • Budget management
  • Performance assessment
  • Community relations
  • Held accountable for results
  • THE SUPER PRINCIPAL

4
Why Different responsibilities for leaders
5
Why Evidence draws a challenging picture
  • Is there enough capacity?
  • Shortages of high-qualified school leader
    candidates.
  • Australia 92 of principals expected to
    retire/resign more than five years before they
    'have to'. (Grady et als (1994))
  • Ontario, Canada 75 of principals and gt 40 vice
    principals expect to retire by 2007 (Williams,
    2001)
  • England 4/10 deputy/assistant principals no
    plans to become a principal 4/10 principals
    considering early retirement (Earley et al,
    2002).
  • Many OECD countries dont have any requirements
    for becoming principals.

6
Why High priority in OECD education work
  • OECD countries want answers
  • The OECD Teacher Policy Thematic Review (Teachers
    Matter, OECD, 2005)
  • Education Chief Executives Meeting, Copenhagen,
    Sept. 2005
  • Ranked 3 out of 29 activities for the Education
    Committee Programme of Work (2007-2008)

7
Why 22 participants
  • Australia
  • Austria
  • Belgium (French)
  • Belgium (Flanders)
  • Chile
  • Denmark
  • Finland
  • France
  • Hungary
  • Ireland
  • Israel
  • Korea
  • The Netherlands
  • New Zealand
  • Norway
  • Portugal
  • Slovenia
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • United Kingdom (England)
  • United Kingdom (N. Ireland)
  • United Kingdom (Scotland)

8
What Our objective
  • To provide policy-makers with information and
    analysis to help them formulate and implement
    school leadership policies leading to improved
    teaching and learning. By
  • Synthesising research on issues related to
    improving leadership in schools
  • Identifying innovative and successful policy
    initiatives and practices
  • Facilitating exchanges of lessons and policy
    options among countries and
  • Identifying policy options for governments to
    consider.

9
What Our view of school leadership
  • A broad view of leadership
  • Rather than focusing on leaders as individuals
  • View that authority to lead can be distributed
    within schools and among different people.

10
What Key Issues to respond to
  • What are the roles and responsibilities of
    school leadership
  • How to best develop effective school leadership

11
What Roles of school leadership
  • Role of school leadership under different
    governance structures
  • Demands on school leaders
  • Different roles and responsibilities of school
    leaders under different governance
  • Types of skills required
  • Is there a set of core competencies?
  • Promising policies and conditions for linking
    school leadership with improving school outcomes

12
What Developing school leadership
  • How can effective school leadership be best
    developed and supported?
  • Should it be a career path? Types of profiles
    pedagogical or other
  • Employment conditions
  • support structures
  • Type of training (pre-service, on the job,
    further training)
  • Types of institutions to develop school leaders

13
How Methodology of the Activity
  • Analytical strand Country Background Reports to
    focus on policies and structures that impact on
    the role and development of effective school
    leadership (January 2007)
  • Innovative practices strand Case studies to
    innovative practices
  • New models of school organisation and management
    that distribute leadership roles and
    responsibilities in innovative ways (UK October
    2006, Finland, January 2007 Belgium February
    2007)
  • Promising programmes and practices to prepare and
    develop school leaders

14
How Outputs of the Activity
  • Country Background Reports (2007)
  • School governance and leadership
  • Enhancing learning and school leadership
  • The attractiveness of school leadership
  • Training and professional development of school
    leaders

15
How Outputs of the Activity
  • International workshops (2006 and 2007)
  • Expert papers
  • Selected case studies (2006-2007)
  • A final international conference (2008)
  • A final comparative report (2008)

16
  • 1st meetings of the activity, London, 5-6 July,
    HSBC Headquarters Contributed to clarify key
    questions on new and changing roles of school
    leaders.
  • 1 Workshop of participating countries
  • 50 participants (28 national delegates, 9
    international organisation, 8 experts) discussed
    the activity and country practices in this area.
  • Common agreement on the timeliness According to
    countries OECD has become a catalyst for thinking
    on school leadership at a national level.
  • 2 Workshop of participating countries Brussels,
    1-2 February 2007
  • Presentation of Country Background Reports

17
School Leadership for Systemic Improvement
  • leadership for systemic improvement the
    distribution of school leadership roles and
    responsibilities to improve schooling outcomes.
  • Meaning still developing, and practice includes
  • Leadership shared across schools so overall
    system improves
  • Connection of systems of leaders to create
    culture and pool of expertise to support school
    improvement
  • Collaboration of education/non-education
    organizations within the larger context to
    sharpen focus on school outcomes and
  • Systemic interaction in schools of
    administrators/teachers/ students as learning
    communities in which leadership is distributed
    according to expertise and need.
  • Different approaches to the challenge of
    developing leadership across the system.

18
High Excellence High Equity Raising the Bar and
Narrowing the Gap
560
High excellence Low equity
High excellence High equity
Finland
540
U.K.
Canada
Korea
Japan
520
U.S.
Belgium
500
Switzerland
Spain
Germany
Mean performance in reading literacy
480
Poland
460
Low excellence Low equity
Low excellence High equity
440
420
60
80
100
120
140
  • 200 Variance (variance OECD as a whole 100)

Source OECD (2001) Knowledge and Skills for Life
19
Every School a Great Schoolas an expression of
moral purpose
  • What parents want is for their local school to be
    a great school.
  • (National Association of School Governors
    Education and Skills Select Committee 2004).
  • The three system leadership commitments
  • relentless focus on reducing within school
    variation
  • collaborative working to eradicate between school
    variation
  • the embracing of segmentation or lateral
    approaches since a focus on individual school
    improvement always distorts social equity.

20
Towards system wide sustainable reform
Building Capacity
Professionalism
Prescription
National Prescription
Every School a Great School
Schools Leading Reform
System Leadership
21
4 drivers mould to context through system
leadership
Personalised Learning
Networks Collaboration
Professional Teaching
SYSTEM LEADERSHIP
Intelligent Accountability
22
The Logic of System Leadership
Learning Potential of all Students
Student Repertoire of Learning Skills
Teacher Repertoire - Models of Teaching
Embedded in Curriculum Context and Schemes of Work
Whole School Emphasis on High Expectations and
Pedagogic Consistency
Sharing Schemes of Work and Curriculum Across and
Between Schools, Clusters, Districts, LEAs and
Nationally
23
4 drivers mould to context through system
leadership
Leading
Personalised Learning
Below floor target
Success-ful
SYSTEM LEADERSHIP
Networks Collaboration
Professional Teaching
Low attaining
Intelligent Accountability
Internal variation
Underperforming
24
Networking and SegmentationHighly
Differentiated Improvement Strategies
25
System Leadership A Proposition
  • System leaders care about and work for the
    success of other schools as well as their own.
    They measure their success in terms of improving
    student learning and increasing achievement, and
    strive to both raise the bar and narrow the
    gap(s). Crucially they are willing to shoulder
    system leadership roles in the belief that in
    order to change the larger system you have to
    engage with it in a meaningful way.

26
System leaders share five striking
characteristics, they
  • measure their success in terms of improving
    student learning and strive to both raise the bar
    and narrow the gap(s).
  • are fundamentally committed to the improvement of
    teaching and learning.
  • develop their schools as personal and
    professional learning communities.
  • strive for equity and inclusion through acting on
    context and culture.
  • understand that in order to change the larger
    system you have to engage with it in a meaningful
    way.

27
Leadership as Adaptive Work
Technical Solutions
Adaptive Work
Technical problems can be solved through applying
existing know how - adaptive challenges create a
gap between a desired state and reality that
cannot be closed using existing approaches alone
28
Act as a Community Leader
Work as a Change Agent
Managing Teaching and Learning
Developing Organisations
Personal Development
Partner another School Facing Difficulties and
Improve it
Moral Purpose
Lead a Successful Educational Improvement
Partnership
Strategic Acumen
Developing People
Lead and Improve a School in Challenging
Circumstances
29
System Leadership Roles
  • A range of emerging roles, including
  • Lead a successful educational improvement
    partnership
  • Executive Headship or partnering another school
    facing difficulties i.e. run two or more schools
    (or softer partnership)
  • Lead in extremely challenging circumstances or
    become an Academy Principal.
  • Civic or Community leadership to broker and shape
    partnerships across local communities to support
    welfare and potential.
  • Change agent or school leader able to identify
    best practice and then transfer and refine it to
    support improvement elsewhere.

30
Principles for System Transformation
School Improvement
Teaching and Learning
System Leadership
System Wide Reform
31
So, for Transformation, System Leadership needs
to be reflected at three levels
  • System leadership at the school level with, at
    essence, school principals becoming almost as
    concerned about the success of other schools as
    they are about their own.
  • System leadership at the local level with
    practical principles widely shared and used as a
    basis for local alignment with specific
    programmes developed for the most at risk groups.
  • System leadership at the Government level with
    social justice, moral purpose and a commitment to
    the success of every learner providing the focus
    for transformation.

32
Paulo Freire once said
  • No one educates anyone else
  • Nor do we educate ourselves
  • We educate one another in communion
  • In the context of living in this world

33
Professor David Hopkins HSBC Chair in
International Leadership
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