The Relationship Between Safety, The Social Emotional Conditions for Teaching - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – The Relationship Between Safety, The Social Emotional Conditions for Teaching PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 152e09-ZDc1Z



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

The Relationship Between Safety, The Social Emotional Conditions for Teaching

Description:

Understanding youth: Adolescent development for educators. Cambridge: Harvard Education Press. ... NELS -Adolescent perceptions of connections with teachers ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:35
Avg rating:3.0/5.0

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: The Relationship Between Safety, The Social Emotional Conditions for Teaching


1
The Relationship Between Safety, The Social
Emotional Conditions for Teaching Learning and
Learning
David Osher AMERICAN INSTITUTES For
RESEARCH dosher_at_air.org
2
An Example of What Can Be Done North Lawndale
College Preparatory School, Chicago
  • This is not about graduating from high school
    it is about graduating from college
  • Money for Counselors, not metal detectors and
    security staff
  • One Counselor stays with same students grades
    9-13 another one follows up 14-16

3
An Example of What Can Be Done North Lawndale
College Preparatory School, Chicago
  • Strong Academic Press Strong Social Support
  • Supports academic risk taking Teachers are like
    another set of parents
  • Development of Moral Community
  • Fellow students like brothers, sisters, cousins

4
What Affects Learning Outcomes?
Capacity For Learning
Conditions For Learning
Capacity For Teaching
Conditions For Teaching
5
Conditions for Learning
Mental Health Physical Health
Experience of Safety Social Emotional
Capacity Authentic Challenge Caring Connection
Support
Health
Social Emotional
Pedagogical
Appropriate Pedagogies Curricula Differentiated
Instruction
Learning Environment Opportunities To
Learn Cultural Competence Organizational
Efficacy Instructional Leadership
Organizational
6
Social Emotional Conditions for Learning
7
Social and Emotional Conditions for Teaching
8
Why Are Conditions For Learning Important The
Importance of Being in the Zone of Proximal
Development For Every Student
  • Zone of Proximal Development (Vygotsky)
  • Personalization,
  • Differentiated instruction and support
  • Scaffolding learning and support

9
The Zone of Proximal Development for Learning
Development
(frustration)
challenge
ZPD
(boredom)
support
  • Nakkula, M. J., Toshalis, E. (2006).
    Understanding youth Adolescent development for
    educators. Cambridge Harvard Education Press.

10
The Challenge Be in the Zone of Proximal
Development for Every Child
11
The Additional Challenge Be in the Zones of
Proximal Development as they Change for Every
Child
12
Why Are Conditions For Learning Important The
Neurochemistry and Neurobiology of Learning
  • attending,
  • concentrating,
  • memorizing

13
Heuristic Question - What happens if the learner
(or teacher) is
  • Angry, anxious, depressed, fearful, frustrated,
    upset, traumatized, worried, sad, otherwise
    distressed?
  • Lacks the skills and neuronal networks to handle
    emotional arousal?
  • Violence and bullying affect these factors
    directly and indirectly (e.g., Nansel et al.,
    2001 Flannery, 2006)

14
Impact of Bullying
  • Prevalence
  • Focus on Learning
  • Attendance
  • Mental Health
  • anxiety
  • depression

15
Examples of relationship between Climate and
Achievement Findings from National Surveys
  • NAEP- At all three grade levels students in
    schools reporting an above-average climate had
    higher mean NAEP mathematics scale scores than
    students in schools reporting average or
    below-average school climate on the same measure
    (Greenberg, Skidmore, Rhodes, Nesbitt, 2001)
  • NELS -Adolescent perceptions of connections with
    teachers predicted academic growth in Mathematics
    (Gregory Weinstein, 2004)
  • NELS -Students were more likely to perform well
    on tests when they believe that their teachers
    care about them (Muller, 2001 Ryan Patrick,
    2001)

16
An Examples of relationship between Climate and
Achievement Alaska Research
  • Positive changes in school climate and
    connectedness related to significant gains in
    student scores on statewide achievement tests in
    reading, writing and math
  • 114 schools in 11 districts including Anchorage
  • Climate (made up of High Expectations, School
    Safety, and School Leadership)
  • Overall Connectedness (made up of Respectful
    Climate, Peer Climate, Caring Adults). (Spier,
    Kendziora, Osher, 2007)

17
Other Research Examples from Individual Studies
  • Feeling secure with teachers and being engaged
    related to positive coping and using teachers to
    address school problems (Ryan et al. 1994)
  • Lack of teacher nurturance was the most
    consistent negative predictor of academic
    performance and social behavior (Wentzel, 2002)
  • Teachers who had high-quality relationships with
    their students had 31 fewer discipline problems,
    rule violations, and related problems over a
    years time than did teachers who lacked
    high-quality relationships with their students
    (Waters, Marzano, McNulty, 2003)

18
Connecting the Dots
Strategic Evidence- Based Learning Supports
Effective Opportunities To Learn
Effective Instructional, Behavioral,
Emotional Supports
Greater Attachment, Engagement, Commitment to
School
Better Academic Performance and Success in
School and Life
  • Teach SEL
  • Competencies
  • Self-awareness
  • Social awareness
  • Self-management
  • Relationship skills
  • Responsible
  • decision making

Safe, Caring, Cooperative, Supporting Engaging
Learning Environments
Less Risky Behavior, More Assets,
Positive Development
19
Lessons
  • Chicago Score Card, School Report, Tool Kit as a
    means of the addressing the barriers created by
    narrowly focused accountability practices
  • Survey Social Emotional Conditions for Learning
    as part of School report card
  • Provide information to school on how students and
    subgroups of students experience the school
    environment
  • Turnaround for Children approach to address the
    challenges created by unmet mental health needs
    and how they disable schools
  • Build Organizational Capacity to address unmet
    mental health needs
  • Reduce disorder and improve conditions for
    teaching and learning
  • Say Yes to Education approach to helping all
    students thrive
  • Monitoring system that addresses health
    (including mental health) , social
    emotional-behavioral, and cognitive-academic
    barriers to thriving
  • Build a school-wide foundation to support
    social-emotional and academic barriers to
    learning

20
Some Resources Articles
  • Osher, D. Fleischman, S. (2005). Positive
    Culture in Urban Schools. Educational
    Leadership, 62 (6), 84-87.
  • Osher, D., VanAker, R., Morrison, G., Gable, R.,
    Dwyer, K., Quinn, M., (2004). Warning Signs of
    Problems in Schools Ecological Perspectives and
    Effective Practices for Combating School
    Aggression and Violence. Journal of School
    Violence, 2/3, 13-37.
  • Osher, D., Sandler, S., Nelson, C. (Winter,
    2001). The Best Approach to Safety is to Fix
    Schools and Support Children and Staff, New
    Directions in Youth Development, 92, 127-154.

21
Some Resources Books
  • Dwyer, K. Osher, D. (2005). Safeguarding Our
    Children An Action Guide Revised and Expanded.
    Longmont, CO Sopris West.
  • Osher, D., Dwyer, K., Jackson, S. (2004).
    Safe, Supportive, and Successful Schools Step by
    Step Longmont, CO Sopris West.
About PowerShow.com