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1st Half of Course Taught by Prof' Harry Dorn, Virginia Tech

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The Element Carbon Crystal Structure, Chemistry, Phase Diagrams ... Advanced Carbon Materials: Glassy Carbon, Activated Carbon, CDC. Fullerenes ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: 1st Half of Course Taught by Prof' Harry Dorn, Virginia Tech


1
Development of a New Course on Nanocarbon
Materials Mool C. Gupta Department of Electrical
and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia,
Charlottesville, VA 22904 Harry C.
Dorn Department of Chemistry, Virginia
Polytechnic Institute of State University,
Blacksburg, VA - 24061
COURSE OUTLINE
DISTANCE LEARNING
LABORATORY EXPERIENCE-Organic Photovoltaic Device
Fabrication
  • 1st Half of Course Taught by Prof. Harry Dorn,
    Virginia Tech
  • The Element Carbon Crystal Structure,
    Chemistry, Phase Diagrams
  • Graphite Structure, Synthesis, Properties and
    Applications, Graphene and Non Planar Graphitic
    Structures
  • Carbon Onions GPC Cones Fullerenes and
    Metallofullerenes Fabrication, Characterization
    and Unique Properties
  • Advanced Carbon Materials Glassy Carbon,
    Activated Carbon, CDC
  • Fullerenes
  • 2nd Half of Course Taught by Prof. Mool Gupta,
    Univ. of Virginia
  • Nanotubes Structure, forms, functionalization,
  • Nanotube Properties electronic, optical,
    mechanical, magnetic and thermal
  • Fabrication and Characterization of CNT
  • CNT materials for energy, Nanoscale devices and
    nanoelectronics applications
  • CNT Applications electron emitters and X-ray
    sources, sensors, nanocomposites, biomedical and
    AFM Tips etc

The leading universities in the Commonwealth of
Virginia have joined to provide education in
several engineering disciplines easily available.
Various Sites University of Virginia,
Virginia Tech, William and Mary, National
Institute of Aerospace, UVa/VT Northern
Virginia, Danville, Richmond, Dahlgren
Thin Film by Spin Coating
DEVICE CROSS-SECTIONIONAL VIEW
Al (150 nm)
P3HTPCBM Blend(110 nm)
PEDOT/PSS (50 nm)
ITO(150-200nm)
Glass (0.9mm)
Anti-reflection
Light
STUDENT FEEDBACK
Metallization E-Beam Evaporation
"It was a very interesting experience for me as I
had no idea about the nanocarbon field before I
took this course. The extent of research,
advancement and the potential applications
totally amazed me. I really liked the
interdisciplinary efforts that were popping up
everywhere. It is wonderful to see people working
together toward a common goal. Rama Rajan,
Virginia Tech "Certainly and without a doubt,
the laboratory sessions at Virginia Tech and UVa.
were the most rewarding part of the class. This
gave us the opportunity to have a hands-on
experience and make the connection between the
theory and concepts and the real device and
chemical synthesis. - Maria Rodriguez , UVa,
Northern Virginia.
SEM Images of P3OTMultiwalled CNT in Toluene
I-V Characterization
LABORATORY EXPERIENCE- SYNTHESIS
INSTRUCTORS PROFILE
Professor Mool C Gupta Langley Professor and
Director of I/UCRC for Laser and Plasma
Applications, Department of Electrical and
Computer Engineering, University of Virginia,
Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 Professor
Harry Dorn Professor of Chemistry and Director of
Carbonaceous Nanomaterials Center
(CNC), Department of Chemistry, Virginia
Tech Blacksburg, VA 26061
STUDENTS AT WORK
A modified Kratschmer-Huffman arc discharge
generator system
Acknowledgments
We thank Professor James Groves (University of
Virginia) and Professor Kathleen Meehan (Virginia
Tech) for many helpful discussions and providing
financial support as well as coordinating the
distance learning facility. Our thanks to
teaching assistant, Vaishali R Koppolu(Univ. of
Virginia) for supporting this course. This work
was supported under NSF grant number EEC-0538828
and Virginia state funding provided to the
Commonwealth Graduate Engineering Program (CGEP).
Post-reaction, showing the consumed anode and the
carbon soot, containing 0.2 mg Gd3NC80 as well
as other carbon forms.
Chemical separation of Fullerenes
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