Critical Need for Communications Protection in a Deregulated Power Market - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


Title: Critical Need for Communications Protection in a Deregulated Power Market


1
Critical Need for Communications Protection in a
Deregulated Power Market
1999 IEEE/PES Ernest M. Duckworth Jr.,
P.E., Senior Member IEEE John S. Duckworth, P.E.
2
Introduction
  • A very effective power system operation alone
    will not be enough as we move into the 21st
    Century
  • In a deregulated power market, the successful
    power company will have a very reliable wire-line
    communication network when fiber is not cost
    effective.
  • The single most important key to success in this
    new age will be our ability to communicate error
    free and without interruption over wire-line,
    which still represents a large majority of the
    present entrance facilities.

3
Reliable Wire-Line CommunicationInto High
Voltage Locations
  • Follow ANSI/IEEE Std. 487-1992
  • Know the fault characteristics, grid resistance,
    X/R ratio, etc.
  • Cooperate and coordinate the protection of leased
    lines
  • Practice Personnel Safety
  • Go to Training

4
Definitions acronyms used in Electrical
Protection
  • High Voltage Interface (HVI) gt The separation of
    wire-line communications conducting paths with
    the use of magnetic or optical isolation
  • Ground Potential Rise (GPR) gt A voltage that
    develops on a grounding system from current
    flowing through the impedance of that ground
  • Ground Grid or Ground Mat gt The grounding system
    built under a substation or power plant in which
    all metallic equipment and plant are bonded
  • Remote Ground gt The distant end of a
    communications circuit that is at a different
    ground reference point with respect to the near
    end

5
Why do High Voltage Locations Require Isolation?
  • Ground Potential Rise (GPR)-Average of one per
    100 miles of power cable plant
  • Standard Gas Tube, MOV, SAD, Carbon Block, or any
    other shunting device does not work
  • High Voltage Interface (HVI) must be a part of
    the Facility Entrance
  • Personnel Safety Equipment Protection cannot be
    obtained without an HVI

6
(No Transcript)
7
(No Transcript)
8
(No Transcript)
9
(No Transcript)
10
When is an HVI Required?
  • GPR exceeds 1000V-Peak-Asymmetrical
  • Regardless of the GPR if circuit reliability
    (Class A Service) is a requirement
  • Ultimately when the responsible design Engineer
    perceives its placement as necessary for the
    protection of personnel and equipment

11
Where is an HVI Physically Located?
  • Within the boundary of the ground grid or ground
    mat
  • Where the station cables will have the shortest
    lengths
  • Where it can be maintained properly and sheltered
    from the elements

12
How is an HVI Placed?
  • Follow IEEE Std. 487-1992, Guide for the
    Protection of Wire-Line Communication Facilities
    Serving Electric Power Stations
  • Conceptually visualize the HVI as having two
    sides
  • High Voltage Side is the hot side or front side
    and it connects to wire-line pairs that leave the
    high voltage location (HVL). Must be in
    nonmetallic (PVC) conduit with floating shield
  • Low Voltage Side is the cold side or back side
    and it connects to wire-line pairs that must stay
    within the HVL. Must be in metallic (steel)
    conduit with shield grounded
  • Never place hot side pairs closer than 5 inches
    from any ground
  • Never place cold side pairs closer than 5 inches
    from hot side pairs
  • Never work on an HVI without standing on an 18kV
    rubber blanket and wearing rubber gloves

13
Conclusions
  • The three examples listed in the paper were
    actual cases of lost revenue from not isolating
    wire-line communications services
  • In a deregulated power market, costs will be the
    control like never before and the loss of
    communications will mean disaster
  • Dont gamble with the possible loss of real time
    information by not properly isolating your
    wire-line communications. It is just not worth
    it
  • Electric Companies properly utilizing isolation
    equipment on their wire-line communication
    facilities will be prepared to compete head-on in
    the new age of a deregulated power market
  • Are you ready now? Are you trained? Do you have
    the right tools?
  • A good number are and do!
  • A good number arent and dont! Which one are
    you?

14
References, Training ToolsinMastering
Electrical Protection
  • IEEE Std. 487, IEEE Std. 367, U S WEST Reference
    Publication Special High Voltage Protection
    77321,June 1998, and Bell Practice 876-310-100
  • Protection Technologies Inc training in
    Electrical Protection by William (Bill) Petersen.
    Two day engineering and installation seminars.
    Call 801-561-5464
  • Web Site http//gpr-expert.com
  • Expert system software GPR-Expert by Expert
    Systems Inc., 703-440-1455
  • Richard Knight-Engineering Manager Positron
    Industries, 505-298-5400, Lewis (Lew)
    Stone-Technical Specialist, 303-871-8656

15
THANKS FOR BEING HERETODAY
  • Ernest M. Duckworth Jr., P.E.
  • VP-Power Products Division
  • Positron Industries Inc.
  • 962 Coronado Drive
  • Sedalia, CO 80135
  • PH 303-688-5800
  • Fax 303-688-5551
  • duckyern_at_email.msn.com
  • John S. Duckworth, P.E., CEO
  • Expert Systems Programs and Consulting
  • (703) 440-1455
  • jack_at_gpr-expert.com
View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Critical Need for Communications Protection in a Deregulated Power Market

Description:

Standard Gas Tube, MOV, SAD, Carbon Block, or any other shunting device does not ... Expert Systems Programs and Consulting (703) 440-1455. jack_at_gpr-expert.com ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:42
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 16
Provided by: ernestmduc
Learn more at: http://gpr-expert.com
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Critical Need for Communications Protection in a Deregulated Power Market


1
Critical Need for Communications Protection in a
Deregulated Power Market
1999 IEEE/PES Ernest M. Duckworth Jr.,
P.E., Senior Member IEEE John S. Duckworth, P.E.
2
Introduction
  • A very effective power system operation alone
    will not be enough as we move into the 21st
    Century
  • In a deregulated power market, the successful
    power company will have a very reliable wire-line
    communication network when fiber is not cost
    effective.
  • The single most important key to success in this
    new age will be our ability to communicate error
    free and without interruption over wire-line,
    which still represents a large majority of the
    present entrance facilities.

3
Reliable Wire-Line CommunicationInto High
Voltage Locations
  • Follow ANSI/IEEE Std. 487-1992
  • Know the fault characteristics, grid resistance,
    X/R ratio, etc.
  • Cooperate and coordinate the protection of leased
    lines
  • Practice Personnel Safety
  • Go to Training

4
Definitions acronyms used in Electrical
Protection
  • High Voltage Interface (HVI) gt The separation of
    wire-line communications conducting paths with
    the use of magnetic or optical isolation
  • Ground Potential Rise (GPR) gt A voltage that
    develops on a grounding system from current
    flowing through the impedance of that ground
  • Ground Grid or Ground Mat gt The grounding system
    built under a substation or power plant in which
    all metallic equipment and plant are bonded
  • Remote Ground gt The distant end of a
    communications circuit that is at a different
    ground reference point with respect to the near
    end

5
Why do High Voltage Locations Require Isolation?
  • Ground Potential Rise (GPR)-Average of one per
    100 miles of power cable plant
  • Standard Gas Tube, MOV, SAD, Carbon Block, or any
    other shunting device does not work
  • High Voltage Interface (HVI) must be a part of
    the Facility Entrance
  • Personnel Safety Equipment Protection cannot be
    obtained without an HVI

6
(No Transcript)
7
(No Transcript)
8
(No Transcript)
9
(No Transcript)
10
When is an HVI Required?
  • GPR exceeds 1000V-Peak-Asymmetrical
  • Regardless of the GPR if circuit reliability
    (Class A Service) is a requirement
  • Ultimately when the responsible design Engineer
    perceives its placement as necessary for the
    protection of personnel and equipment

11
Where is an HVI Physically Located?
  • Within the boundary of the ground grid or ground
    mat
  • Where the station cables will have the shortest
    lengths
  • Where it can be maintained properly and sheltered
    from the elements

12
How is an HVI Placed?
  • Follow IEEE Std. 487-1992, Guide for the
    Protection of Wire-Line Communication Facilities
    Serving Electric Power Stations
  • Conceptually visualize the HVI as having two
    sides
  • High Voltage Side is the hot side or front side
    and it connects to wire-line pairs that leave the
    high voltage location (HVL). Must be in
    nonmetallic (PVC) conduit with floating shield
  • Low Voltage Side is the cold side or back side
    and it connects to wire-line pairs that must stay
    within the HVL. Must be in metallic (steel)
    conduit with shield grounded
  • Never place hot side pairs closer than 5 inches
    from any ground
  • Never place cold side pairs closer than 5 inches
    from hot side pairs
  • Never work on an HVI without standing on an 18kV
    rubber blanket and wearing rubber gloves

13
Conclusions
  • The three examples listed in the paper were
    actual cases of lost revenue from not isolating
    wire-line communications services
  • In a deregulated power market, costs will be the
    control like never before and the loss of
    communications will mean disaster
  • Dont gamble with the possible loss of real time
    information by not properly isolating your
    wire-line communications. It is just not worth
    it
  • Electric Companies properly utilizing isolation
    equipment on their wire-line communication
    facilities will be prepared to compete head-on in
    the new age of a deregulated power market
  • Are you ready now? Are you trained? Do you have
    the right tools?
  • A good number are and do!
  • A good number arent and dont! Which one are
    you?

14
References, Training ToolsinMastering
Electrical Protection
  • IEEE Std. 487, IEEE Std. 367, U S WEST Reference
    Publication Special High Voltage Protection
    77321,June 1998, and Bell Practice 876-310-100
  • Protection Technologies Inc training in
    Electrical Protection by William (Bill) Petersen.
    Two day engineering and installation seminars.
    Call 801-561-5464
  • Web Site http//gpr-expert.com
  • Expert system software GPR-Expert by Expert
    Systems Inc., 703-440-1455
  • Richard Knight-Engineering Manager Positron
    Industries, 505-298-5400, Lewis (Lew)
    Stone-Technical Specialist, 303-871-8656

15
THANKS FOR BEING HERETODAY
  • Ernest M. Duckworth Jr., P.E.
  • VP-Power Products Division
  • Positron Industries Inc.
  • 962 Coronado Drive
  • Sedalia, CO 80135
  • PH 303-688-5800
  • Fax 303-688-5551
  • duckyern_at_email.msn.com
  • John S. Duckworth, P.E., CEO
  • Expert Systems Programs and Consulting
  • (703) 440-1455
  • jack_at_gpr-expert.com
About PowerShow.com