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Learning Reconsidered and Advising: Stacking the Deck for Transformational Learning

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Defines learning as 'a comprehensive, holistic, transformative ... Humanitarianism. Civic engagement. Inter- and Intra-personal competence. Practical competence ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Learning Reconsidered and Advising: Stacking the Deck for Transformational Learning


1
Learning Reconsidered and Advising Stacking the
Deck for Transformational Learning
  • Jennifer L. McCaul
  • Grand Valley State University
  • 2005 NACADA National Conference
  • Concurrent Session 310
  • October 7, 2005

2
What is Learning Reconsidered?
  • A new statement on student affairs
  • Defines learning as a comprehensive, holistic,
    transformative activity that integrates academic
    learning and student development, processes that
    have often been considered separate and even
    independent of each other.

3
Where did it come from?
  • Jointly published by ACPA NASPA
  • Builds on past documents
  • Student Learning Imperative (ACPA, 1994)
  • Principles of Good Practice (ACPA, 1996)
  • Powerful Partnerships (NASPA, 1998)

4
Where did it come from?
  • AACUs Greater Expectations (2002)
  • Complex capacities and knowledge desired in
    college graduates can develop through all course
    and non-course experiences of a students college
    years
  • Learning happens during formal classroom study,
    but also in other ways.

5
What does it do?
  • New ways of understanding learning
  • Advocates for transformative education
  • Questions current organizational patterns
  • Emphasizes work of Student Affairs professionals
  • Describes how student affairs affects student
    outcomes

6
Transformational Learning
  • Focus of education must shift from information
    transfer to identity development
    (transformation)
  • requires consideration of what students know,
    who they are, what their values and behavior
    patterns are, and how they see themselves
    contributing to and participating in the world

7
Why reconsider learning?
  • New research
  • Changing times
  • Diversity of students
  • Curriculum may not meet needs

8
Goals/Priorities
  • To produce intentional learners who can adapt to
    new environments, integrate knowledge from
    different sources and continue learning
    throughout their lives.
  • If we expect students to become empoweredand
    responsible for their actions, we must makeit
    accessible to all students.

9
Student Development Learning
  • Unifies cognitive structural and
    psychosocial/identity theories
  • The most important factor is that transformative
    learning always occurs in the active context of
    students lives.

10
Student Development Learning
11
Student Learning Outcomes
  • Cognitive complexity
  • Knowledge acquisition, integration, and
    application
  • Humanitarianism
  • Civic engagement
  • Inter- and Intra-personal competence
  • Practical competence
  • Persistence and academic achievement

12
Student Learning Opportunities
  • Student affairs and Academic partnerships
  • Student affairs learning opportunities
  • Academic learning opportunities

13
Recommendations from the text
  • Determine, specify, measure, and assess intended
    student outcomes
  • Establish routine ways to document students
    experiences as learners
  • Map the campus environment for interactive,
    integrated learning experiences

14
Links to Academic Advising
  • Academic advising is the ONLY structured
    activity on the campus in which ALL students have
    the opportunity for on-going, one-on-one
    interaction with a concerned representative of
    the institution
  • (Habley,2005)

15
Links to Academic Advising
  • Advising is concerned not only with the specific
    personal or vocational decision, but also with
    facilitating the students rational processes,
    environmental and interpersonal interactions,
    behavioral awareness and problem-solving,
    decision making and evaluation skills
  • (Crookston, 1972)

16
Developmental Advising Model
  • A systematic process based on close
    student-advisor relationship intended to aid
    students in achieving educational, career, and
    personal goals through the use of the full range
    of institutional and community resources
  • (Winston, Miller, Ender, Grites, 1984)

17
Developmental Advising Model
  • Exploration of life goals
  • Exploration of educational/career goals
  • Problem solving, decision making, evaluation
  • Selection of academic program
  • Selection of courses
  • Scheduling of classes
  • (OBanion, 1972)

18
NACADA Core Values
  • Advisors' work is guided by their beliefs that
    students
  • have diverse backgrounds
  • hold their own beliefs and opinions
  • responsible for their own behaviors and the
    outcomes of those behaviors
  • can be successful based upon their individual
    goals and efforts
  • have a desire to learn
  • have learning needs that vary
  • use a variety of techniques and technologies to
    navigate their world.

19
Learning Outcomes for Advising
  • Intellectual Growth
  • Career choices
  • Appreciating diversity
  • Social responsibility
  • Enhanced Self-Esteem
  • Meaningful interpersonal relationships
  • Effective communication
  • Healthy behavior
  • Personal and Educational Goals (CAS, 2003)

20
LR Outcomes vs. Advising Outcomes
  • Cognitive complexity
  • Knowledge acquisition, integration, application
  • Humanitarianism
  • Civic engagement
  • Inter- and Intra-personal competence
  • Practical competence
  • Persistence and academic achievement
  • Intellectual Growth
  • Career choices
  • Appreciating diversity
  • Social responsibility
  • 5a. Enhanced Self-Esteem
  • 5b. Meaningful interpersonal relationships
  • 6a. Effective communication
  • 6b. Healthy behavior
  • Personal and Educational Goals

21
Group Activity
  • In groups of 5-8 brainstorm a strategy/program/met
    hod that an advisor can use to assist a student
    with the learning outcome assigned. Time 10
    minutes
  • Each group has 1 minute to present Best
    Practice identified in each group. Time 10
    minutes

22
Questions
Contact Information mccaulj_at_gvsu.edu
23
Learning Reconsidered
Available for download or purchase from
www.myacpa.org or www.naspa.org
24
References
  • Association of American Colleges and Universities
    (AACU). (2002). Greater expectations The
    commitment to quality as a nation goes to
    college. Retrieved May 10, 2005 from
    http//www.greaterexpectations.org/
  • ACPA. (1994). Student learning imperative
    Implications for student affairs. Retrieved May
    10, 2005, from http//www.acpa.nche.edu/sli/sli.h
    tm
  • ACPA. (1996). Principles of good practice for
    student affairs. Retrieved May 10, 2005, from
    http//www.acpa.nche.edu/pgp/principle.htm
  • Council for the Advancement of Standards in
    Higher Education (CAS). (2003). The book of
    professional standards for higher education (3rd
    ed.). Washington, DC Author
  • Crookston, B. B. (1972). A developmental view of
    academic advising as teaching. Journal of College
    Student Personnel, 13, 1217.
  • Habley, W. (2005, Winter) Academic advising
    services key to student retention, but
    underutilized. Activity,43(1). Retrieved May 10,
    2005, from http//www.act.org/activity/winter2005/
    advising.html
  • NACADA. (2004). NACADA Statement of Core Values
    of Academic Advising. Retrieved May 10, 2005,
    from http//www.nacada.ksu.edu/Clearinghouse/Advi
    singIssues/Core-Values.htm
  • NASPA. (1998). Powerful partnerships A shared
    responsibility for learning. Retrieved May 10,
    2005, from http//www.naspa.org/resources/partner
    ships.cfm
  • O'Banion, T. (1972). An academic advising model.
    Junior College Journal, 42, 62-69.
  • Winston, R. B., Miller, T. K., Ender, S. C.,
    Grites, T. J., Associates (1984). Developmental
    academic advising. San Francisco Jossey-Bass.
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