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Multisensory phonemic awareness practice for dyslexic English Language Learners

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MSL-ELL, IDA 08, Seattle. 1. Multisensory phonemic awareness ... What type of ... transfers from L1 to L2(Frith, et al., 2007; Goswami, 2002) ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Multisensory phonemic awareness practice for dyslexic English Language Learners


1
Multisensory phonemic awareness practice for
dyslexic English Language Learners
  • Presenters
  • Elke Schneider (Ph.D.)
  • Ellen Richardson (MA)
  • Tsila Evers (Ph.D.)

2
Outline
  • Background on English Language Learners (ELLs)
  • Who are ELLs?
  • Why focus on ELLs?
  • How do ELLs learn English?
  • What type of instruction do ELLs need?
  • Principles of Multisensory Structured Language
    MSL) instruction
  • Strategies

3
Background on English Language Learners (ELLs)
  • Who are English language learners?
  • Students for whom English is not the native or
    first language.Includes
  • first generation (child immigrated),
  • 1.5 generation (child of immigrants born in US)
    generation and
  • second generation immigrants (grandparents
    immigrated)

4
Why focus on ELLs?
  • Fastest growing school population between 100
    and 700 in last 10 years (Hood, 2003 Kindler,
    2002 Whelan, Morales-Jones, Yaya, Zainuddin,
    2006).
  • Every 9th student is a non-native speaker in
    2025, it is every 4th student (Klingner, Hoover,
    Baca, 2008)

5
Why focus on ELLs?
  • ELLs are falsely represented in SPED due to
  • inappropriate and biased testing that does not
    take culture differences into consideration
    (Friend, 2006 Klingner, Hoover, Baca, 2008) and
  • unprepared administration teachers (Klingner,
    Hoover, Baca, 2008)

6
L2 learning facts
  • How do ELLs learn English?
  • Learning L1 (first language) is different from
    learning L2 (additional language) gt requires
    explicit instruction (Klingner, Hoover, Baca,
    2008)
  • ELLs success in influenced by culture shock,
    immigration story, use of home language,
    expectations at home, value of education
    (Klingner, Hoover, Baca, 2008)
  • Learning goes through stages. Errors are a
    natural, necessary byproduct of going through
    interlanguage phases (Selinker, 1979), not a
    sign of disability.

7
L2 learning facts
  • L2 learners use what they know in L1 in L2
    cross-linguistic transfer gt allowing both
    languages in class is a benefit (Koda, 2007)
  • Phonemic awareness transfers from L1 to L2(Frith,
    et al., 2007 Goswami, 2002)
  • The more ELLs know about their L1 the sooner they
    will succeed in English (L2) because of language
    transfer (Cummins, 1979)
  • It takes ELLs 2-5 years to acquire native-speaker
    proficiency in oral, social language. (Cummins,
    1979)

8
L2 learning facts
  • It takes ELLs 7-9 years to acquire academic
    proficiency (read, write, speak, comprehend
    content area specifics) (Cummins, 1979).
  • CRUX In many states, national standardized
    testing routines require ELLs to take high stakes
    tests after year 1 NCLB requires it after year 3
    (Whelan, Morales-Jones, Yaya, Zainuddin, 2006).

9
MSL instruction for ELLs
  • Research supports the use of Multisensory
    Structured Language instruction with ELLs from
    within the ELL field without referring to it
    these terms (Mathes, 2007 Vaugh, et al., 2006)
  • Positive effects of MSL instruction in one
    language transfer to another (Sparks, et al.,
    1998)
  • Next follow essential principles that unite best
    practices and assessment procedures for ELLs.

10
MSL instruction for ELLs
  • ELLs need
  • explicit instruction of language patterns to
    succeed in a timely fashion traditional L2
    language instruction does not foster that
    (August Shanahan, 2006, 2007)
  • carefully sequenced instruction that moves from
    less to more complex in smallest increments
    (-gtdifferentiated instruction) (August
    Shanahan, 2006, 2007)

11
MSL instruction for ELLs
  • ELLS need instruction that is
  • Metacognitive Show ELLs how and why letter-sound
    patterns are pronounced and spelled the way they
    are so they can learn to self-correct
  • Multisensory visual, auditory,
    kinesthetic-tactile learning makes content
    comprehensible for ELLs. Support oral language
    simultaneously with gestures, pictures, use of
    concrete items, role play, flow charts and other
    graphic organizers. Students see-say-do what
    they need to comprehend. (Reiss, 2000)

12
MSL instruction for ELLs
  • ELLS need instruction that is
  • Repetitive Provide ample repetition in oral and
    written use of language patterns to reach
    automaticity because they are mapping any content
    taught comparatively in L1 and L2 (Koda, 2007) -gt
    see MSL activities
  • Diagnostic-prescriptive Use dynamic assessment
    to identify during and after instruction where
    and why students struggle with a letter-sound
    concept and respond appropriately and immediately
  • Use check sheets (see samples) Documentation for
    RTI
  • Other observation charts
  • Direct interaction with student during learning
    (prompting questions)
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