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College Bound

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It is time to get your kids ready for college. This presentation will inform you of what you will need to prepare your child to attend college. It will also inform you of the forms that you will need for Financial Aide. If you have a student athlete the NCAA information is also introduced. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: College Bound


1
COLLEGE BOUND
  • DR. PAULA SHELBY
  • Benedict College
  • Chair of Health, Physical Education, Recreation
    and Leisure Services
  • 803-705-4775

2
CLASSES I SHOULD TAKE (before graduation)DIVISI
ON I CoreCourse Requirements
4 years of English 3 years of Math 2 years
Science (1 year of lab if offered) 1 year of
additional English, Math or Natural/Physical
Science 2 years of Social Science 4 years of
additional courses (Foreign Language/Comparative
Religion/Philosophy)
3
  • How often is it administered?
  • SAT Seven times per year.ACT Six times per
    year.
  • What is the test structure?
  • SAT Ten sections 3 Critical Reading 3 Math 3
    Writing 1 Experimental.The experimental section
    looks just like a regular section.ACT Five
    sections English, Math, Reading, Reasoning
    (Science), and Writing.
  • What does each section test?
  • SAT Math up to geometry and algebra IIReading
    sentence completions, short and long critical
    reading passagesWriting grammar, usage, word
    choice, and a mandatory essayACT Math up to
    trigonometryReasoning charts, graphs,
    interpretations of science-based
    materialReading four passages of prose fiction,
    social humanities, and natural scienceEnglish
    grammarWriting optional essay
  • Is there a penalty for wrong answers?
  • SAT Yes. ¼ of a point is taken off for each
    wrong answer.ACT No.
  • How is the test scored?
  • SAT 200-800 per section, added together for a
    score of 600-2400 2-12 for the essayACT 1-36
    for each subject averaged composite score 2-12
    for the essay
  • How can I register?
  • SAT Educational Testing Service www.collegeboard
    .comACT ACT, Inc www.ACTstudent.org

4
Here are some extracurricular activities that
students get involved with and find one that fits
your passion and get involved today!
  • Student Newspaper
  • Student Government
  • Any Leadership Positions
  • Choir or Orchestra
  • Varsity Sports
  • Community Service/Volunteer Work
  • Eagle Scouts
  • All-State Anything
  • Math Club
  • After-School Jobs

5
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6
THINGS TO CONSIDER
Types of Associate Degrees A.A. (Associate of
Arts) This degree requires students to complete
a coursework of 60 hours, including courses in
general education and other courses related to
the degree program. A.A. degree is often awarded
in liberal art areas, like English, music or
history. A.S. (Associate of Science) It focuses
on science and requires students to complete many
hours of coursework in general education. Common
A.S. programs include biology and
chemistry. A.A.S. (Associate of Applied Science)
It is designed to ready students to join the
working world. There are several types of this
degree, including programs in business or
engineering. A.E. (Associate of Engineering)
Focuses on engineering A.A.A. (Associate of
Applied Arts)  Deals with applied arts A.P.S.
(Associate of Political Science) Mainly focuses
on political science
Types of Bachelors Degrees B.A. (Bachelor of
Arts) It is considered as the widest bachelors
degree. The BA degree focuses on arts but also
require the students to take some general
education classes. B.S. (Bachelor of Science)
It usually covers majors such as engineering,
physics, accounting or business or any of the
sciences. A B.S. degree requires some general
studies courses. B.F.A. (Bachelor of Fine Arts)
Professional actors, dancers, singers, sculptors
and painters are perfect candidates for this
degree. BFA degree is also offered in fields such
as digital media and web design. B.B.A. (Bachelor
of Business Administration) BBA degree often
covers courses in management strategy, decision
making and even organizational psychology. You
should opt for this course if you aspire to be a
general manager. B.Arch. (Bachelor of
Architecture) This is a degree program that
future architects must complete.
7
COLLEGES UNIVERSITIES YOU CAN ATTEND
  • NCAA COLLEGES UNIVERSITIES
  • Division I
  • Division II
  • Division III

8
Applying to College
  • Application. It seems silly to even list this,
    but with all the other things you have to turn in
    lets keep this on this just to be sure.
  • Application Fee. Most schools will have an
    application fee, but do your homework. Depending
    on your familys income level the fee may be
    waived, or schools might also waive this fee if
    you apply online.
  • High School Transcripts. This is an official
    record from your high school that has your grade
    and GPA information. You can get this from your
    guidance counselor or the Registrars office. If
    you have guidance counselor get your transcript
    from them, they are an invaluable resource in the
    college application process.
  • Official Test Scores. The majority of US schools
    require you to take a standardized test. Here is
    more homework for you. Some schools will only
    accept the SAT, others both the SAT and ACT. Some
    schools may even require a second test called the
    SATII this is a subject test designed to measure
    your mastery on a specific subject. Know what
    tests you need to take, and be sure to give
    yourself enough to time to prepare and get the
    scores to your school in time.
  • Letters of Recommendation. These are letters
    written by your guidance counselor, teachers, and
    maybe even employers that give admissions
    officers more information about the type of
    person you are. This is why it is so important to
    make good and lasting impressions on your
    teachers.
  • Essay. This is by far the most intimidating, yet
    fun, part of the application. This is your chance
    to finally talk about yourself. Think about it,
    your application is all about you based on what
    other people have to say. The essay is your time
    to speak out. Dont let tricky prompts weigh you
    down by talking about stats, numbers, facts, and
    issues. Spin topics to reflect your point of
    view, your life, and your voice.
  • Resume. This is a good thing to have in your
    application as part of your supplemental
    (additional) information. This gives admission
    officers an idea of your level of involvement and
    commitment.

9
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11
COLLEGE ATHLETEShttp//www.ncaa.org/
  • NCAA CLEARINGHOUSE INFORMATION FOR
  • Division I
  • Division II
  • Division III
  • Student Athletes
  • Future Players
  • Current Players
  • Former Players

12
COLLEGE ATHLETES CHECKLIST
  • Skip to main content
  •                                
  • NCAA
  • Search Google Appliance
  • Enter the terms you wish to search for.
  • Submit Content Media Center NCAA.COM
  • About Us
  • Who We Are
  • What is the NCAA?
  • Our Three Divisions
  • Supporting College Athletes
  • Office of the President
  • Employment
  • Search for a School
  • What We Do
  • Academics
  • Well-Being
  • Fairness
  • Grade 9
  • Ask your counselor for a list of your high
    schools NCAA core courses to make sure you take
    the right classes.
  • Grade 10
  • Register with the NCAA Eligibility Center
    at eligibilitycenter.org.
  • Grade 11
  • Check with your counselor to make sure you will
    graduate on time with the required number of NCAA
    core courses.
  • Take the ACT or SAT and submit your scores to the
    NCAA using code 9999.
  • At the end of the year, ask your counselor to
    upload your official transcript to the NCAA
    Eligibility Center.
  • Grade 12
  • Finish your last NCAA core courses.
  • Take the ACT or SAT again, if necessary, and
    submit your scores to the NCAA using code 9999.
  • Complete all academic and amateurism questions in
    your NCAA Eligibility Center account at
    eligibilitycenter.org.
  • After you graduate, ask your counselor to submit
    your final official transcript with proof of
    graduation to the NCAA Eligibility Center.

13
  • Division I uses a sliding scale to match SAT/ACT
    scores and core-course grade-point averages to
    determine eligibility. The sliding scale balances
    your test score with your GPA.
  • If you have a low test score, you need a higher
    GPA to be eligible. If you have a low GPA, you
    need a higher test score to be eligible.

14
  • Division I Academic Eligibility
  • To be eligible to compete in NCAA sports during
    your first year at a Division I school, you must
    graduate high school and meet ALL the following
    requirements
  • Complete 16 core courses
  • Four years of English
  • Three years of math (Algebra 1 or higher)
  • Two years of natural/physical science (including
    one year of lab science if your high school
    offers it)
  • One additional year of English, math or
    natural/physical science
  • Two years of social science
  • Four additional years of English, math,
    natural/physical science, social science, foreign
    language, comparative religion or philosophy
  • Complete 10 core courses, including seven in
    English, math or natural/physical science, before
    your seventh semester. Once you begin your
    seventh semester, you may not repeat or replace
    any of those 10 courses to improve your
    core-course GPA.
  • Earn at least a 2.3 GPA in your core courses.
  • Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score
    matching your core-course GPA on the Division I
    sliding scale, which balances your test score and
    core-course GPA. If you have a low test score,
    you need a higher core-course GPA to be eligible.
    If you have a low core-course GPA, you need a
    higher test score to be eligible.
  • What if I dont meet the requirements?

15
Division I Academic EligibilityTo qualify as an
academic redshirt, you must graduate high school
and meet ALL the following academic requirements
  • Complete 16 core courses
  • Four years of English
  • Three years of math (Algebra 1 or higher)
  • Two years of natural/physical science (including
    one year of lab science if your high school
    offers it)
  • One additional year of English, math or
    natural/physical science
  • Two years of social science
  • Four additional years of English, math,
    natural/physical science, social science, foreign
    language, comparative religion or philosophy
  • Earn at least a 2.0 GPA in your core courses.
  • Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score
    matching your core-course GPA on the Division I
    sliding scale.
  • If you are concerned you may not meet the
    Division I academic requirements, consider taking
    the following actions
  • Ask for advice and accountability from your high
    school counselor. Check in with the admissions or
    compliance office at the college you hope to
    attend.
  • Get tutoring or other study help.
  • Graduate on time. Division I schools allow
    college-bound student-athletes who graduate
    on-time to take one core course during the year
    after they graduate high school.
  • Avoid quick fixes through credit recovery
    programs. These courses may not be accepted by
    the NCAA.
  • Keep your coursework. If the NCAA Eligibility
    Center needs to review your record due to
    irregularities, you may be asked to provide your
    coursework.

16
  • Contact the Eligibility Center
  • For students and parents with eligibility
    questions877/262-1492 (toll free)317/917-6222
  • Transcript/Document Mailing AddressNCAA
    Eligibility CenterCertification ProcessingP.O.
    Box 7136Indianapolis, IN 46207
  • Overnight/Express Mailing AddressNCAA
    Eligibility CenterCertification Processing1802
    Alonzo Watford Sr. DriveIndianapolis, IN 46202
  • Customer Service Hours9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern
    time Monday through FridayFax number
    317/968-5100Toll-free phone number (U.S. callers
    and Canada except Quebec)  877/262-1492
  • International StudentsPhone number
    (international callers) 317/917-6222NCAA
    Eligibility Center International Contact Form

17
1. Send letters/videos to college coaches2. Work
with your coaches3. Determine NCAA Division I,
II, or III?4. Register with NCAA
Clearinghouse5. Take the PSAT/SAT/ACT 6. Take
required number of Core Academic classes
ATHLETICS
  • College Try-outs
  • Making the College Team
  • Things to Consider
  • Practices
  • Games
  • Classes
  • Traveling
  • Academic Support
  • You can play
  • Intramurals/Recreation Sports

18
RESOURCES
  • http//www.go4college.com/
  • www.collegedata.com/cs/promo/promo_calcodds_tmpl.j
    html
  • http//www.princetonreview.com/college/match-reach
    -safety.aspx
  • http//www.cappex.com
  • http//www.ctcl.org/
  • http//collegesearch.collegeboard.com/search/index
    .jsp
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