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Literacy Coaching Master Class

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Title: Literacy Coaching Master Class


1
Literacy Coaching Master Class
  • Literacy Institute
  • Orlando
  • July 2008

2
Introduction
3
Getting to Know You!
  • Talk with your tablemates about …
  • How many years have you been in education?
  • What grade levels and/or subject areas have you
    taught?
  • How many years have you been a reading coach?

4
Consider this . . .
  • There is no such thing as excellence in teaching
    when in solitude. By definition, excellence in
    teaching is a form of communication and
  • group activity.

Adam Urbanski, 2005 in Stephen G. Barkley, 2005,
foreword Quality Teaching in a Culture of
Coaching
5
What are your goals?
  • Reflect on your goals for attending the Literacy
    Coaching - Master Class strand of the Literacy
    Institute.
  • Why are you here?
  • What do you want to accomplish this week?
  • Work with your table group to review the agenda
    and discuss your goals for the institute.
  • Write your lists on chart paper, and post in the
    training room.
  • Be prepared to share.

Marlene Caroselli, 1998, p. 16-17 Great Session
Openers, Closers Energizers
6
We will use the agenda and your posted
expectations to . . .
  • Review what we have accomplished throughout the
    academy.
  • Check-off the topics we have addressed, and note
    the areas in which more training may be needed
    during the upcoming year.


7
Our Central Text
  • Our central text for the academy is The Literacy
    Coach Guiding in the Right Direction by Enrique
    A. Puig and Kathy S. Froelich.
  • A vital resource for the institute is the
    collective experiences and reflections of its
    participants.

8
  • …we do not learn as much from experience as we
    learn from reflecting on that experience.

Thomas S. C. Farrell, 2004, p. 7 Reflective
Practice in Action 80 Reflection Breaks for Busy
Teachers
9
Sharing the Wisdom
  • Collaboration with the
  • Novice Class Coaches
  • Session 11 Wednesday, 1015 1145
  • Join with the novice class coaches to engage in
    coaching conversations and coaching-the-coach
    activities.
  • Session 15 Thursday, 1015 1145
  • Novice class coaches will shadow our process of
    planning for our role of the coach at the school
    site.
  • Passing Down the Wisdom conversation

10
What is a Reading Coach?
  • The Just Read, Florida! office defines a reading
    coach as follows
  • A reading coach is a professional development
    liaison within the school to support, model, and
    continuously improve SBRR Scientifically Based
    Reading Research instructional programs in
    reading to assure reading improvement for ALL
    students.

Just Read, Florida! 2005-2006 K-12 Comprehensive
Research-Based Reading Plan
11
Reading Coaches…
  • …drive change in schools by disseminating
    literacy information and inciting enthusiasm
    about improving students reading and writing.
  • As a resident expert of literacy education in a
    school, a reading coach, provides in-school
    support for teachers as they develop and improve
    their instructional and assessment skills. Part
    of the job includes assisting teachers in
    implementing strategies for grouping students and
    solving literacy-related problems.

David Booth Jennifer Roswell, 2002, p. 16-17
The Literacy Principal Leading, Supporting and
Assessing Reading and Writing Initiatives
12
CONTINUUM OF COACHING
Transformation may occur when teachers/coaches
are provided opportunities to observe, co-teach,
confer, study, research, and reflect on practice.
Inter-active coaching
Intra-active coaching
Provide an observation lesson to improve learning
and teaching with feedback and collaborative
input.
Co-teach with colleague to improve learning and
teaching based on mutually agreed upon learning
goals and success indicators.
Confer, observe, and debrief to improve learning
and teaching.
Facilitate a study group or literacy leadership
team to investigate adaptive challenges to
improve learning and teaching.
Facilitate collaborative action research to seek
resources after reflection to improve learning
and teaching.
Facilitate a workshop or session to improve
learning and teaching
Increased scaffolding
Decreased scaffolding
SUBJECT-CENTERED PEDAGOGY
SOLUTION-SEEKING ANDRAOGOGY
adapted from E. A. Puig K. S. Froelich,
2007 The Literacy Coach Guiding in the Right
Direction
13
Create a list…
  • of all the things that you do each day and each
    week as the reading coach.

14
10 Roles of Reading Coaches
  • Resource provider the purpose is to expand
    teachers use of a variety of resources to
    improve instruction.
  • Data coach the purpose is to ensure that
    student achievement data drives instructional
    decisions at the classroom and school level.
  • Curriculum specialist the purpose is to ensure
    implementation of adopted curriculum.
  • Instructional specialist the purpose is to
    align instruction with curriculum to meet the
    needs of all students.

Joellen Killion Cindy Harrison, 2006 Taking
the Lead New Roles for Teachers and School-based
Coaches
15
10 Roles of Reading Coaches
  • Classroom supporter the purpose is to increase
    the quality and effectiveness of classroom
    instruction.
  • Mentor the purpose is to increase instructional
    skills of the novice teacher and support
    school-wide induction activities.
  • Learning facilitator the purpose is to design
    collaborative, job-embedded, standards-based
    professional learning.

Joellen Killion Cindy Harrison, 2006 Taking
the Lead New Roles for Teachers and School-based
Coaches
16
10 Roles of Reading Coaches
  • School leader the purpose is to work
    collaboratively with the schools formal
    leadership to design, implement, and assess
    school change initiatives to ensure alignment and
    focus on intended results.
  • Catalyst for change the purpose is to create
    disequilibrium with the current state as an
    impetus to explore alternatives to current
    practice.
  • Learner the purpose is to model continuous
    learning, to keep current, and to be a thought
    leader in the school.

Joellen Killion Cindy Harrison, 2006 Taking
the Lead New Roles for Teachers and School-based
Coaches
17
What Does a Literacy Coach Do?
  • Once you have created the list, review the Puig
    Froelich text - Appendix B - pg. 121.
  • How does your list compare with Appendix B?
  • Are there things that need to be
    eliminated/reduced/revised in my schedule?

18
Questions to Ponder…
  • What factors impact your ability to carry out
    your role as the reading coach?
  • Discuss the factors that impact your role as a
    coach.
  • How can you increase your time engaging in
    effective and efficient coaching activities?
  • Brainstorm solutions.

19
Effective Professional Development…
  • includes theory, demonstration, practice/feedback
    and coaching/teaming.
  • When learners participate in the study of theory,
    they can be expected to recall some specifics
    but only a few (5) will be able to apply the
    skills.
  • When learners observe the modeling of the skill,
    a few (20) will be able to apply the skill at
    the training site.

David Collins, 2000, p. 62 Achieving Your Vision
of Professional Development How to Assess Your
Needs and Get What you Want
20
Effective Professional Development
  • When learners are given time to
    demonstrate/practice the skill in a protected
    environment, most learners (up to 95) will be
    able to demonstrate the skill at the training
    site. However, the majority will not use the
    skill at the work place without benefit of
    coaching and/or a support team.
  • When learners coach one another as they work the
    new skill into their repertoire, most (75-95)
    who are part of the support team will apply the
    new skill on the job.

David Collins, 2000, p. 62 Achieving Your Vision
of Professional Development How to Assess Your
Needs and Get What you Want
21
Think About It…
  • Select a Guiding Principle from the bag.
  • With your shoulder partner, discuss what that
    guiding principle means to you as a reading
    coach.
  • Use the Puig Froelich text pg 97 105 as a
    reference for further clarification of the
    guiding principle.
  • Be prepared to share your insights.

22
Guiding Principles for a Literacy Coach
  • Puig and Froelich text, Pgs. 97 105
  • Which principles would you like to come back to?
  • Which principles do you need to investigate
    further?

23
Coaches can…
  • transform schools into learning centers. The way
    they engage teachers through the lens of
    curiosity or inquiry can stimulate interest in
    exploring the complex and challenging work
    teachers do each day.
  • facilitate knowledge sharing and knowledge
    creation through their ongoing work with
    teachers.
  • engage teaches as professionals in the analysis
    of and reflection on their work.
  • acknowledge teachers struggles and join them in
    the struggles.
  • honor teachers as individuals and professionals
    and support them cognitively and emotionally.
  • work alongside their principals and colleagues to
    shape the very fiber of the school.

Joellen Killion Cindy Harrison, 2006, p.
154-155 Taking the Lead New Roles for Teachers
and School-based Coaches
24
Ourselves as Teachers
25
Getting to Know All About You!
  • Talk with your tablemates about …
  • What college did you attend?
  • What was your major in college?
  • How did you decide to go into education?

26
Guiding Principles
  • Lets revisit the Guiding Principles on pg.
    97 105.
  • Highlight the Guiding Principles that relate to
    teaching.
  • What do these principles tell us about teaching
    children?

27
Why …
  • are we asking you to analyze your role as teacher?

28
Qualifications of the Reading Coach
  • What must reading coaches
  • know and be able to do?
  • Because the primary role of reading coaches is
    to provide support to classroom teachers for
    classroom reading instruction, it is essential
    that they be excellent classroom teachers
    themselves.
  • Have in-depth knowledge of reading processes,
    acquisition, assessment and instruction.
  • Have expertise working with teachers to improve
    their practice.

International Reading Association, 2004 The Role
and Qualifications of the Reading Coach in the
United States
29
Literacy As a Process
  • …understanding literacy processing is critical
    for a literacy coach... It will be through this
    clear, yet cogent, understanding of processing
    that a literacy coach will be able to scaffold
    and lift teachers and administrators to question
    instructional practices and improve student
    learning.
  • Enrique A. Puig Kathy S. Froelich, 2007, p. 20
  • The Literacy Coach Guiding in the Right
    Direction
  • …unless teachers and literacy coaches understand
    learning as a process, teaching and coaching will
    be hit or miss.
  • Enrique A. Puig Kathy S. Froelich, 2007, p. 2
  • The Literacy Coach Guiding in the Right Direction

30
Expert teachers will have the…
  • knowledge, strategies meaning instructional
    practices and materials to judge what to do with
    particular children, not on the basis of
    ideology, but on the basis of observation, logic,
    knowledge of child development, knowledge of
    content, and evidence for what works.

Louisa C. Moats, 1999, p. 17 Teaching is Rocket
Science What Expert Teachers of Reading Should
Know and Be Able To Do
31
Teaching Practices that Transfer to Coaching
  • Transmitting knowledge and constructing
    knowledge
  • Understanding and knowing strengths and
    weaknesses
  • Using data to inform teaching and learning
  • Increasing ownership and independence
  • Building trust
  • Understanding learning as a process

32
Reading is . . .
  • . . . a message-getting, problem-solving
    activity that increases in power and flexibility
    the more it is practiced.
  • Marie M. Clay, 2001, p. 1
  • Change Over Time in Childrens Literacy
    Development
  • Refer to the Puig Froelich text, pp. 26
    (bottom) through the end of the second paragraph
    on page 27. Consider the processes you use when
    you read and write.
  • List as many as you can and discuss with your
    partner.

33
Reading is a Complex Process
  • We dont learn to read following a truly linear
    model.
  • We all rely on different sources of information
    or working systems to read, and this makes the
    process more complex.
  • We bring our personal background experiences and
    context to bear when we engage in text.
  • We have constructed mental working systems of
    information that are assembled and disassembled
    contingent on the text at hand.

Enrique A. Puig Kathy S. Froelich, 2007, p.
27 The Literacy Coach Guiding in the Right
Direction
34
What is meant by assembling (or constructing)
working systems?
  • . . .bringing together a group of
  • elements that interact and
  • function together as a whole,
  • capable of being used to
  • further an activity.

FLaRE, 2008, S2-6 Foundations and Applications of
Differentiating Instruction Competencies Four
and Five
35
Reading as a Process A Framework for Guiding
Readers

Kathy S. Froelich Enrique A. Puig, in press The
Literacy Leadership Team Sustaining and
Expanding Success
36
Strategic Activities
  • Readers sustain reading by coordinating a variety
    of means to perceive, internalize, and use
    meaning.
  • Readers
  • - solve words
  • -monitor and correct
  • -search for and use information
  • -summarize
  • -maintain fluency
  • -adjust

Irene Fountas Gay Su Pinnell, 2006, p.
45 Teaching for Comprehending and Fluency
Thinking, Talking, and Writing about Reading, K-8
37
Readers expand meaning by. . .
  • Predicting
  • Making connections
  • Inferring
  • Synthesizing
  • Analyzing
  • Critiquing

Irene Fountas Gay Su Pinnell, 2006, p.
53 Teaching for Comprehending and Fluency
Thinking, Talking, and Writing about Reading, K-8
38
Because each person is unique . . .
  • . . . we think of reading as a process
    rather than the reading process. This may
    sound like we are overly fine-tuning this
    concept, but remember, experience has taught us
    that when language is explicit, clear, and
    precise, theres less need for explanation, thus
    reducing confusion and misinterpretation.

Enrique A. Puig Kathy S. Froelich, 2007, p.
28-29 The Literacy Coach Guiding in the Right
Direction
39
Two questions to ask
  • What is occurring with this learner?
  • How do I interact with what is occurring?

40
Something to think about…
  • Keeping the conditions for learning, reading and
    writing as a process . . . in the forefront, we
    need to investigate the impact that this
    information may have on our coaching and
    teaching/learning.
  • We need to ask What can be investigated that
    would help improve instruction for . . .
    students? Not that there is anything wrong,
    but how can it be improved? How is a successful
    lesson elevated to a significant lesson?

Enrique A. Puig Kathy S. Froelich, 2007, p.
30 The Literacy Coach Guiding in the Right
Direction
41
Important Understandings
  • …in order for us to teach reading and writing as
    a tool for thinking and learning, the critical
    elements described by the NRP, along with other
    critical elements such as writing and oral
    language development, should be inherent in our
    lessons so that there is an increased likelihood
    that our lessons will be effective.
  • Part of the job of a literacy coach should be to
    look for, and support teachers in looking for,
    the critical elements in their lessons.

Enrique A. Puig Kathy S. Froelich, 2007, p.
37 The Literacy Coach Guiding in the Right
Direction
42
Learning As A Process Reading, Writing, Math,
Science, Social Studies
  • Comprehension and fluency are paramount
  • Working systems may create new sources of
    information
  • Phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary,
    comprehension and fluency are embedded in context
  • Feedforward (predicting and anticipating) makes
    the process efficient
  • Feedback (checking, searching, and
    self-correcting) makes the process effective
  • Working systems are transformational

Enrique A. Puig Kathy S. Froelich, 2007, p.
28 The Literacy Coach Guiding in the Right
Direction
43
context
EXECUTING
THINKING
context
context
context
context
ADJUSTING
RETHINKING
context
Enrique A. Puig Kathy S. Froelich, 2007, p.
28 The Literacy Coach Guiding in the Right
Direction
44
Observational Lenses
  • Read pg. 42- 48 (first paragraph) in the Puig
    Froelich text.
  • Highlight key points pertaining to triangulation.
  • Be prepared to share your learning.

45
Lets Take a Look …
  • A Triangulation Model
  • Figure 3.1, pg. 44
  • Puig and Froelich text

46
Triangulation
  • Richard Sagor stated that triangulation provides
    these benefits
  • It compensates for the imperfections of
    data-gathering instruments.
  • When multiple measures yield the same results,
    confidence in the results is increased.
  • When multiple measures fail to yield the same
    results, it can raise important follow-up
    questions.

Richard Sagor, 1992, p. 45 How to Conduct
Collaborative Action Research
47
Multiple Sources of Data
  • Artifacts
  • Participant Observations
  • Non-participant Observations

48
Assessing or Assisting?
  • Consider your role as a teacher.
  • What sources of data do you use to assess student
    learning?
  • What sources of data do you use to assist student
    learning?
  • How does utilizing multiple sources of data
    impact student learning?

49
  • The power in this model is not in the
    observational lenses themselves but in the
    conversations they may produce, since language is
    a tool of the mind….

Enrique A. Puig Kathy S. Froelich, 2007, p.
50 The Literacy Coach Guiding in the Right
Direction
50
Dissect Our Work Teaching Video
51
Lets put our learning into action!
  • As you view the video, record evidence of the
    following
  • Teachers understanding of learning as a process
  • Teachers use of multiple sources of data
  • Coachs use of prompts to gather information and
    assist teacher in planning, utilizing her
    knowledge of learning as a process and
    triangulation.

52
Video
  • Preconference video

53
Analysis of Preconference
  • Discuss with your tablemates your observations
    and notes from viewing the video.

54
Notetaking 101
  • Skim Chapter 4, pp. 54 63 of the Puig
    Froelich text.
  • What did you reconnect with about note-taking?
  • What difficulties do you encounter in your
    note-taking?

55
Notetaking/Notemaking
  • Why?
  • Book boxes on tables, workboard visible.
  • Purpose?
  • Focus? What do you want the kids to think about
    while writing?
  • TPR?
  • Note Response letter from Ms. Vickeys class to
    observe workstations.
  • So the kids understand thats something they can
    do to remember a message.
  • Why?
  • Teaching by analogy.
  • How is rereading going to help the students in
    their writing?
  • 1210 T Thats what good readers do. They try to
    connect to things in their lives.
  • Teacher roving room.
  • 1220 Teacher reviewed rules for sitting in front
    of the easel.
  • T Mrs. Porche has given us this huge umbrella.
    So we need to write her a thank you note. When we
    write a letter to someone, what do we need to do
    first?
  • S Date
  • T Write September.
  • 1221 T Are you talking about indenting?
  • T Take a few minutes to think.
  • T Repeats message students have given.
  • T Say it with me so I dont forget it.
  • T Lets clap donation.
  • T Used white board, nation, definition
  • T Read back what we have.

56
Lets Practice
  • As you watch the video, concentrate on your
    note-taking.
  • … it is the critical details that will support
    or scaffold our efforts.

Enrique A. Puig Kathy S. Froelich, 2007, p.
54 The Literacy Coach Guiding in the Right
Direction
57
Video
  • This is a teaching video based on the
    pre-conference

58
Analysis of Instruction
  • Discuss with your tablemates your observations
    and notes taken while viewing the video.
  • Keeping the Continuum of Coaching in mind, what
    would be your next steps if you were this
    teachers coach?

59
  • What does this process reveal about your own
    teaching?

60
Analyze Our Work Planning for Instruction
61
Working Together
  • For this session, you will need to work in
    groups.
  • Get into groups of 3 or 4.
  • Person 1 teacher
  • Person 2 reading coach
  • Person 3 and 4 coach of the coach

62
Preplanning Recording
  • Teacher Talk aloud planning a lesson that
    requires you to think about learning/reading as a
    process.
  • Coach Support the teacher.
  • Coach of the coach Support the coach on an as
    needed basis.
  • Tape recorder on!

63
Listen!
  • Listen to the conversation.
  • What did you notice about the conversation?
  • What did you notice about the teacher?
  • What did you notice about the coach?
  • What did you notice about the coach of the coach?
  • Did you gain new knowledge?
  • How did your perspective change?

64
  • What does this process reveal about your own
    teaching?

65
Ourselves as Coaches
66
Ponder this …
  • Why did you become a reading coach?

67
Guiding Principles
  • Lets revisit the Guiding Principles on pg.
    97 105.
  • Highlight the Guiding Principles that relate to
    coaching.
  • What do these principles tell us about being
    effective and efficient coaches?

68
Triangulation
  • Consider triangulation from the perspective of a
    reading coach.
  • As a coach…
  • When do you assess?
  • When do you assist?

69
Triangulation
  • Artifacts
  • Participant Observations
  • Non-participant Observations

70
Three Major Categories for Coaching
  • Read Chapter 5, pp. 65 - 74 in the Puig
    Froelich text.
  • Highlight key points pertaining to categorizing.
  • Be prepared to share your learning.

71
Coaching Conversations
  • Coaching is a conversation directed toward
    inquiry the reading coach and teacher are
    making hypotheses and searching for information.
    Their greatest source of data are their
    observations of children as they look for
    evidence of learning.

Carol A. Lyons Gay Su Pinnell, 2001, p.
142 Systems for Change in Literacy Education
72
Give and Take
  • Both participants in a conversation …
  • Make statements and ask questions one doesnt
    interrogate the other.
  • Offer advice and help.
  • Clarify for each other.
  • Share experiences.
  • Share hunches.

73
Coaching Prompts
  • Tell me what you were doing when …
  • Describe the students behavior when . . .
  • After this lesson, can you describe how the
    outcomes matched your goals?
  • How did you recognize the need to switch
    approaches?

74
Coaching Prompts
  • It seems as if youre curious about alternative
    methods of teaching grammar.
  • Your action plan was focused on questioning
    strategies. Lets begin with a review of the
    questions you asked.
  • You said your lesson flowed. What did you do to
    facilitate this success and what would you want
    to continue in the future?
  • Now that you better understand the supports a
    book needs for students to read during guided
    reading, what are two changes you could make in
    your classroom practice?

75
Think and Write
  • …the teacher, not the coach that evaluates the
    lessons success.
  • What makes prompts effective?

Robert Garmston, Christina Linder, Jan
Whitaker, 1993, p. 57 Reflections on Cognitive
Coaching
76
Discussion
  • When should we engage in coaching conversations?
  • Why are these conversations so important?

77
Dissect Our Work Coaching Video
78
Lets put our learning into action!
  • Watch for evidence of the following
  • Teachers understanding of learning as a process
  • Teachers use of multiple sources of data
  • Revise and extend your notes based on new
    learning.

79
Video
  • Watch video

80
Categorization
  • Work with a partner.
  • Categorize your notes.
  • Create a coaching point based on your efforts.

81
Post-Conference Video
  • Think about …
  • The conversation between the teacher and coach.
  • The language that the coach used.
  • Did he/she tell or reveal?
  • Were the prompts effective? Why/Why not?
  • The coaching point.
  • What was the coaching point?
  • Did it differ from your coaching point? Why?

82
  • What does this process reveal about your own
    coaching?

83
Analyze Our Work Coaching Conversations
84
Working Together
  • For this session, you will need to work in
    groups.
  • Get into groups of 3 or 4.
  • Person 1 teacher
  • Person 2 reading coach
  • Person 3 and 4 coach of the coach

85
Pre-Conference
  • Teacher
  • Give gist of lesson
  • Tell about the students
  • Coach engage in a pre-conference conversation
    with teacher.
  • Coach of the coach support the coach on an as
    needed basis.

86
Now Showing…
  • Watch the teaching video.
  • Take notes!

87
Try It!
  • All participants will…
  • Review their notes.
  • Categorize their notes.
  • Create a coaching point.
  • Plan the coaching conversation.

88
Coaching Conversation
  • Remember your group roles!
  • The teacher and the coach will engage in the
    coaching conversation.
  • The coach of the coach will support the reading
    coach as needed.

89
Reflect on the Process
  • How effective was the coaching conversation?
  • How effective was the language used in the
    coaching conversation?
  • Did team members have different coaching points?
    Why?
  • What could have made the coaching conversation
    more powerful?

90
  • What does this process reveal about your own
    coaching?

91
Keeping Coaching Alive
92
Share the Success
  • Think about the successes that you have had as a
    reading coach.
  • Decide on one success story to share with your
    table.
  • Each table decide on one success story to share
    with the entire group.

93
The Challenge
  • Good enough is no longer good enough to get all
    students where they need to be.

Karen James, 2008 Keeping Coaching
Effective Presented at the 2008 National Reading
Recovery K-6 Classroom Literacy Conference
94
Comfortable?!
  • Are you in a coaching rut?
  • What signs signal that you are in a rut?
  • What actions can you take to get out of the rut?
  • How can you keep going so that your coaching
    stays new and fresh?

95
Indicators of Comfort
  • Appeasement
  • Too many compromises
  • Give and take when students are at stake
  • Losing our focus
  • Student achievement slipping
  • Interest in being a coach fades
  • Passion for professionalism dwindles

Karen James, 2008 Keeping Coaching Effective.
Presented at the 2008 National Reading Recovery
K-6 Classroom Literacy Conference
96
Stuck on procedures?
  • Are you teaching the teachers how to ..
  • Think
  • Reflect
  • Make decisions
  • Problem solve

Karen James, 2008 Keeping Coaching Effective.
Presented at the 2008 National Reading Recovery
K-6 Classroom Literacy Conference
97
What to do?
  • Rejuvenate ourselves
  • Be the change we want to see
  • Change things up
  • No more status quo
  • No more thinking inside the box
  • Develop new teams and new leadership ideas

Karen James, 2008 Keeping Coaching Effective.
Presented at the 2008 National Reading Recovery
K-6 Classroom Literacy Conference
98
Back to the Basics
  • Meeting
  • Talking
  • Reflecting
  • Focusing on data
  • Adjusting instruction
  • Relying on one another

Karen James, 2008 Keeping Coaching Effective.
Presented at the 2008 National Reading Recovery
K-6 Classroom Literacy Conference
99
Own it …
  • Weve already done that!
  • or
  • You already taught us that!
  • Acknowledge it!
  • This is my new learning …

100
Are you growing…
  • as a coach?
  • as a teacher?
  • as a professional?
  • How do I plan on working on my own professional
    development?

101
Self-Check
  • Routinely, reflect on your practice as a coach to
    avoid getting comfortable or being stuck in a
    rut.
  • What the teachers are doing reflects my coaching.

102
Collaborate with Novice Class Coaches
103
Time for Collaboration
  • Coaches are faced with competing, critical
    needs. Work together to craft responses to the
    following scenarios.
  • Coach as teacher vs. coach as student.
  • We need to be experts about literacy but we
    dont need to think that we are the experts on
    literacy, or that we are the only literacy
    experts the school can have.
  • How do we encourage teachers to come to us with
    specific questions about literacy instruction
    without communicating that we know everything . .
    .?


Jan Miller Burkins, 2007, p. 10-11 Coaching for
Balance How to Meet the Challenges of Literacy
Coaching
104
Scenario
  • 2. Coach as coach vs. coach as
    supervisor/evaluator
  • We need to know what is happening in
    classrooms, but we need to make sure we do not
    shift from a coaching stance to an administrative
    one.
  • How do we monitor classroom progress without
    assuming a position of authority?


Jan Miller Burkins, 2007, p. 13 Coaching for
Balance How to Meet the Challenges of Literacy
Coaching
105
Scenario
  • 3. Teaching to deep understanding vs. teaching
    to a program
  • We want to give teachers a broad knowledge of
    the reading process that supersedes particular
    programs adopted by our schools or districts, but
    we also want teachers to be comfortable with
    those materials the district requires them to
    use.
  • How do we help teachers wisely use program
    materials in light of their developing
    understandings of reading theory?


Jan Miller Burkins, 2007, p. 13 Coaching for
Balance How to Meet the Challenges of Literacy
Coaching
106
Scenario
  • 4. Introducing something new vs. maintaining
    something established
  • We need to address the implementation of new
    initiatives, but we dont need to lose our grip
    on improvements we have already made. Getting any
    new program or promoting any change is going to
    make learning in that area increase because focus
    has shifted in that direction.
  • How do we help teachers keep shifting their
    focus to something new without losing sight of
    current efforts and successes?


Jan Miller Burkins, 2007, p. 11 Coaching for
Balance How to Meet the Challenges of Literacy
Coaching
107
Scenario
  • 5. Working with teachers who want your support
    vs. working with teachers who dont.
  • We need to concentrate our efforts where we can
    have the greatest effect on instruction, and that
    is usually among the teachers who are receptive
    to our involvement in their work. However,
    coaches are hired to work throughout a school,
    and we dont contribute to the development of a
    school community if we are only working in
    pockets of the building.
  • How do we develop working relationships
    throughout the school without becoming frustrated
    by those who have priorities other than working
    with us?


Jan Miller Burkins, 2007, p. 12 Coaching for
Balance How to Meet the Challenges of Literacy
Coaching
108
Scenario
  • 6. Data collection vs. instructional time
  • We need to support teachers as they try to base
    their instructional decisions on sound
    assessments, but we dont need to let assessment
    become so time-consuming that instruction is
    compromised. The most informative assessments are
    those that teachers give to individual children.
    However, these also are the most time-consuming
    measures.
  • How do we gather just enough data to make valid
    instructional decisions without encroaching on
    the time teachers need to spend teaching?


Jan Miller Burkins, 2007, p. 13 Coaching for
Balance How to Meet the Challenges of Literacy
Coaching
109
Scenario
  • 7. Attending to signs of teacher distress vs.
    pushing for growth
  • We need to nudge teachers out of their comfort
    zones, but we shouldnt forget what its like to
    be a classroom teacher.… When are their concerns
    and expressions of dissent necessary growing
    pains, and when are they an indication that a
    teacher is in distress?
  • How do we help teachers step into the zone of
    dissonance that is a prerequisite for growth
    without overly focusing on the outcome at their
    expense?


Jan Miller Burkins, 2007, p. 13 Coaching for
Balance How to Meet the Challenges of Literacy
Coaching
110
Scenario
  • 8. Consistency across classrooms vs.
    individuality among teachers
  • We need to push toward consistency across
    classrooms, but we need to give teachers room to
    be individuals. Some basic practices must be in
    place, but if we try to squeeze all teachers into
    one mold, they will be unhappy.
  • How do we develop the consistency that counts in
    classrooms and still give teachers room to make
    important instructional decisions and let their
    individuality influence their work?


Jan Miller Burkins, 2007, p. 12 Coaching for
Balance How to Meet the Challenges of Literacy
Coaching
111
Scenario
  • 9. Taking care of teachers vs. taking care of
    ourselves
  • We need to make working with teachers and
    students our priority but not at the expense of
    attending to our own professional, physical, and
    emotional needs. If we give but never stop to
    replenish ourselves, we will eventually find
    ourselves without the intellectual, physical, and
    emotional resources that we need to do our jobs.
  • How do we take care of ourselves while
  • we are taking care of everybody else?


Jan Miller Burkins, 2007, p. 14 Coaching for
Balance How to Meet the Challenges of Literacy
Coaching
112
Scenario
  • 10. Work life vs. home life
  • …we need to have the energy to accomplish the
    emotional, mental, and physical tasks necessary
    to be happy at home and enjoy our work. We dont
    want work to seep into our time at home, and we
    dont want commitments at home to intrude on our
    time at work.
  • How do we attend to our personal and
    professional lives without compromising either?


Jan Miller Burkins, 2007, p. 14 Coaching for
Balance How to Meet the Challenges of Literacy
Coaching
113
Coach Principal Relationship
114
Think About It …
  • The effectiveness of the coaching initiative
    hinges on the principal and reading coach
    relationship, wherein the principal is
    accountable for effective implementation of the
    initiative, while the reading coach receives the
    necessary professional development and
    subsequently coaches, mentors, and partners with
    teachers during the literacy time.

David Booth Jennifer Roswell, 2002 The
Literacy Principal Leading, Supporting, and
Assessing Reading and Writing Initiatives
115
Fountas and Pinnell
  • Administrators foster a professional learning
    community to inspire good teaching.
  • Retaining good teachers leads to improved school
    culture.
  • Cooperating with enthusiasm promotes reflection
    and practice.

116
Killion and Harrison
  • Partnership agreements are a form of contract or
    mutual agreement between a coach and his or her
    principal.
  • The agreements typically are about the scope of
    the work, expected results, and other details
    associated with the coachs work with individuals
    or teams.

117
Roles and Responsibilities
  • Coach
  • Principal
  • What expectations do you have of me and the work
    I do?
  • What responsibilities will I have as a member of
    this staff?
  • What responsibilities will I have beyond my
    coaching responsibilities?
  • What do you expect of me?
  • What do we think teachers expect of you?
  • What does the district expect of you?

Joellen Killion Cindy Harrison, 2006 Taking
the Lead New Roles for Teachers and School-based
Coaches
118
Clients
  • Coach
  • Principal
  • Which teachers will I work with?
  • How will I determine which teachers to work with?
  • Where are the greatest needs in our school?
  • Which teachers have expressed interest in
    receiving your support?
  • Our areas of greatest student need are …

Joellen Killion Cindy Harrison, 2006 Taking
the Lead New Roles for Teachers and School-based
Coaches
119
Boundaries of Work
  • Coach
  • Principal
  • What are the boundaries of my work?
  • What are outside the boundaries of my work?
  • How do you feel about me …e.g. serving on a
    district committee, facilitating a school
    committee, etc.
  • What are the defined responsibilities of your
    role as a coach?
  • How much flexibility do we have to adjust your
    work to meet the needs of our students and staff?

Joellen Killion Cindy Harrison, 2006 Taking
the Lead New Roles for Teachers and School-based
Coaches
120
Support and Resources Needed
  • Coach
  • Principal
  • Here is how you can support me in my role as a
    coach …
  • What resources are available to me?
  • Where will I meet with teachers?
  • What technology will be available for me?
  • Do I have access to money for professional
    publications or development?
  • What support do you want from me?
  • What resources do you need to feel comfortable?
  • Heres how you will share in the schools
    resources for professional development…

Joellen Killion Cindy Harrison, 2006 Taking
the Lead New Roles for Teachers and School-based
Coaches
121
Expected Results
  • Coach
  • Principal
  • What percentage of the staff do you expect me to
    work with?
  • What results do you expect over the next year,
    two years, three years?
  • What are the schools improvement goals?
  • What procedural goals are appropriate for your
    work in this school?
  • Here are the improvement goals we have …

Joellen Killion Cindy Harrison, 2006 Taking
the Lead New Roles for Teachers and School-based
Coaches
122
Timelines
  • Coach
  • Principal
  • When do you want this finished?
  • What are the short- and long-term timelines for
    my work?
  • When will you be able to meet with all
    departments?
  • When will you complete your one-on-one visits
    with every teacher?

Joellen Killion Cindy Harrison, 2006 Taking
the Lead New Roles for Teachers and School-based
Coaches
123
Communication
  • Coach
  • Principal
  • When shall we meet to discuss my work plan?
  • How often shall we meet to discuss my work?
  • When can we meet to discuss how you plan your
    work to serve teachers and contribute to school
    goals for student achievement?

Joellen Killion Cindy Harrison, 2006 Taking
the Lead New Roles for Teachers and School-based
Coaches
124
Processes
  • Coach
  • Principal
  • What process do we want to establish to help
    teachers access my assistance?
  • What is the best way for me to spend the majority
    of my time?
  • How will I log my work? What evidence do you
    want?
  • What process do you think will help teachers
    access your services easily and conveniently?
  • How will you demonstrate how you spend your
    time?
  • What evidence will you be comfortable providing
    me about your interaction with teachers?

Joellen Killion Cindy Harrison, 2006 Taking
the Lead New Roles for Teachers and School-based
Coaches
125
Confidentiality
  • Coach
  • Principal
  • What are your expectations related to the
    information you expect from me about my work with
    individual teachers or teams of teachers?
  • What agreements can we make about confidentiality
    that will allow teachers to feel comfortable
    interacting with me, sharing their strengths and
    weaknesses, and being willing to take risks to
    change their instructional practices?
  • What is the best way for me to tell you when I
    feel you are asking for information that is
    outside of our agreement?
  • What agreements do you think are important about
    confidentiality that will allow teachers to feel
    comfortable interacting with me, sharing their
    strengths and weaknesses, and being willing to
    take risks to change their instructional
    practice?
  • How will we monitor the agreements we make about
    confidentiality?

Joellen Killion Cindy Harrison, 2006 Taking
the Lead New Roles for Teachers and School-based
Coaches
126
Reflect…
  • What partnership agreements do you and your
    principal already have in place?
  • Are these agreements effective or do they need to
    be revised?
  • What partnership agreements do you need to
    establish with your principal?
  • Create a plan of action based on the above
    reflections.

127
The Literacy Coach
  • Skim pgs. 88 - 93.
  • Highlight insights about scaffolding the
    principal.
  • Discuss these insights with your table partners.
  • Be prepared to share ONE main insight discussed.

128
The Principal…
  • is the key to a good school.
  • is the most important reason why teachers grow
    or are stifled on the job.
  • is the most potent factor in determining school
    climate.

129
Putting It All Together Collaborate with Novice
Class Coaches
130
Coaching contributes to change …
  • in student learning, in teaching, in
    professionalism, and in school culture.
  • Coaching reinforces the importance of precise
    instruction and high quality professional
    learning. Coaching unleashes the potential of all
    educators by supporting risk taking and
    experimentation. Coaching makes a difference for
    students, teachers, principals, schools, and
    school systems.

Joellen Killion Cindy Harrison, 2006 Taking
the Lead New Roles for Teachers and School-based
Coaches
131
What is your vision for your school?
  • Think about …
  • Student achievement
  • What data to use?
  • How to use the data?
  • Professional development
  • A coaching plan
  • Way-of-work
  • Instruction What forward shifts are needed?

132
Think About …
  • How can you accomplish that vision?
  • What needs to happen…
  • A Five Year Implementation Plan
  • A Yearly Plan
  • Monthly/semester goals
  • Weekly schedule and goals
  • Daily schedule (refer back Session 1)

133
Resources to Assist
  • Puig Froelich Text
  • Chapter 6 pp. 77 85 Becoming a Co-Learner
  • Pg 91 or Appendix M, pg 132 The Five Year
    Implementation Plan
  • Appendix B, pg 121 What Does a Reading Coach Do?

134
Passing Down the Wisdom
  • Master class coaches will share their
    experiences, wisdom, lessons learned, helpful
    hints, and things that they wished someone had
    told them when they first began as a coach.
  • Novice class coaches, this is your opportunity to
    ask your burning questions about coaching .

135
Final Thoughts
  • …conversation is the most ancient and easiest
    way to cultivate the conditions for change…
  • Margaret Wheatley , 2002, p. 3
  • Turning to One Another Simple
  • Conversations to Restore Hope to the Future
  • …the implementation of every coaching program
    begins first with a conversation.
  • Stephen Barkley, 2005, p. 153
  • Quality Teaching in a Culture of Coaching

136
Resources
  • Barkley, S. G. (2005). Quality Teaching in a
    Culture of Coaching. Lanham, MD Scarecrow
    Education.
  • Booth, D., Roswell, J. (2002). The Literacy
    Principal Leading, supporting, and assessing
    reading and writing initiatives. Ontario, Canada
    Pembroke Publishers.
  • Burkins, J. M. (2007). Coaching for Balance How
    to Meet the Challenges of Literacy Coaching.
    Newark, DE International Reading Association.
  • Caroselli, M. (1998). Great Session Openers,
    Closers, and Energizers Quick Activities for
    Warming Up Your Audience and Ending on a High
    Note. New York MacGraw-Hill.
  • Clay, M. M. (2001). Change Over Time in
    Childrens Literacy Development. Portsmouth, NH
    Heinemann.
  • Collins, D. (2000). Achieving Your Vision of
    Professional Development How to Assess Your
    Needs and Get What you Want (3rd ed.).
    Greensboro, NC SERVE

137
Resources
  • Farrell, T. S. C. (2004). Reflective Practice in
    Action 80 Reflection Breaks for Busy Teachers.
    Thousand Oaks, CA Corwin Press.
  • Garmston, R., Linder, C., Whitaker, J. (1993).
    Reflections on cognitive coaching. Educational
    Leadership, 51(2), 57-61.
  • Fountas, I., Pinnell, G. S. (2006).Teaching for
    Comprehending and Fluency Thinking, Talking,
    and Writing about Reading, K-8. Portsmouth, NH
    Heinemann.
  • Fountas, I., Pinnell, G. S. (2008, February).
    Keys to Effective Coaching. Presented at the 2008
    National Reading Recovery K-6 Classroom
    Literacy Conference, Columbus, OH.
  • International Reading Association. (2004). The
    Role and Qualifications of the Reading Coach in
    the United States. Newark, DE International
    Reading Association.
  • James, K. (February, 2008). Keeping Coaching
    Effective. Presented at the 2008 National
    Reading Recovery K-6 Classroom Literacy
    Conference, Columbus, OH.

138
Resources
  • Killion, J., Harrison, C. (2006). Taking the
    Lead New Roles for Teachers and School-based
    Coaches. Oxford, OH National Staff Development
    Council.
  • Lyons, C., Pinnell, G. S. (2001). Systems for
    Change in Literacy Education A Guide to
    Professional Development. Portsmouth, NH
    Heinemann
  • Moats, L. (1999). Teaching is Rocket Science
    What Expert Teachers of Reading Should Know and
    Be Able To Do. Washington, DC American
    Federation of Teachers.
  • Puig, E. A., Froelich, K. S. (2007). The
    Literacy Coach Guiding in the Right Direction.
    Boston Allyn and Bacon.
  • Sagor, R. (1992). How to Conduct Collaborative
    Action Research. Alexandria, VA Association for
    Supervision and Curriculum Development.

139
Contact Information
  • Florida Literacy and Reading Excellence Center
    (FLaRE)
  • 407-823-4785
  • http//flare.ucf.edu
  • Reading First Professional Development
  • (RFPD)
  • 407-823-1194
  • http//rfpd.ucf.edu

140
Contact Information
  • University of Central Florida
  • 4000 Central Florida Blvd.
  • Teaching Academy 403
  • Orlando, FL 32816-1250
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