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Stevenson Boys Distance

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No one has given freer vent to racing's agony. ... I like to make something beautiful when I run. ... to run on some of the most beautiful trails in the area. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Stevenson Boys Distance


1
Stevenson Boys Distance
  • Track Distance Training Plan Spring 2005

2
Training Calendar
3
Training Calendar
4
Recovery Runs
  • These are designed to allow your body to recover
    from hard training runs while adding to your base
    mileage.
  • As such, they are as important as the long runs
    in helping your body properly adapt to the higher
    mileage. Since their purpose is to help you
    recover more completely, you should start out at
    an extremely relaxed effort and gradually settle
    into a very relaxed effort. Typically they are
    run I minute slower per mile than your long runs.
  • At this effort, your body is on automatic pilot
    and can more effectively circulate out the toxins
    (the natural waste products of muscle cell
    contractions) from your legs. Any faster and you
    will actually accumulate more hydrogen ions in
    the bloodstream.
  • Most runners don't run slow enough on their
    recovery days and end up injured or overtrained
    sooner or later since their bodies are not given
    the chance to recover enough. It is also
    important to run on the softest and flattest
    surface you can find to lessen the pounding on
    your body.
  • Afterwards, stretch assertively for at least
    10-15 minutes to improve your flexibility and
    squeeze out any remaining tightness.

5
Recovery Runs
  • Dates TBA

6
JUNK Miles
  • For someone who is training for a race, junk
    miles are...
  • ...miles run without a specific purpose and/or
    miles done with a purpose, but done incorrectly
    (like doing a recovery run too fast).
  • The term was first defined by Dr. Jack Daniels to
    describe training intensity inappropriate to the
    desired stressor. A good example would be
    running a recovery run too fast or too long.
  • Another dimension I use is that junk miles are
    those that prevent you from achieving your
    intended goal on your next scheduled run.

7
Dual Minor Meets
  • Every race is a TEST OF COURAGE.
  • For runners to achieve their goals and realize
    their full potential, we must encourage them to
    take that test.
  • 3/10/2005 GREEN VS GOLD _at_ Stevenson Field House
  • 3/17/2005 LAKE ZURICH _at_ Stevenson H.S. Field
    House
  • 3/5/2005 BUFFALO GROVE INVITE _at_ BUFFALO GROVE
    H.S.
  • 4/11/2005 ANTIOCH, NORTH CHICAGO _at_ Stevenson
    H.S.Stadium
  • 4/18/2005 WARREN _at_ LIBERTYVILLE _at_ LIBERTYVILLE
    H.S.
  • 4/25/2005 VERNON HILLS _at_ MUNDELEIN _at_ MUNDELEIN
    H.S.
  • 5/2/2005 ZION BENTON _at_ WAUCONDA _at_ WAUCONDA H

8
Major and Championship Frosh/Soph Meets
  • 5/4/2005 F/S ANTIOCH INVITATIONAL _at_ ANTIOCH H.S.
  • 4/26/2005 F/S NEW TRIER INVITE _at_ NEW TRIER EAST
    H.S.
  • 5/14/2005 F/S PRAIRIE LAKE F/S INVITE _at_ WAUCONDA
    H.S.

9
Major and Championship Varsity Meets
  • 4/15/2005 PATRIOT RELAYS _at_ Stevenson H.S.
    Stadium
  • 4/22/2005 BOB COHOON INVITE _at_ DOWNERS GROVE SOUTH
    H.S.
  • 4/29/2005 GLENBROOK NORTH INVITATIONAL _at_
    GLENBROOK NORTH H.S.
  • 5/6/2005 LAKE COUNTY INVITE _at_ HIGHLAND PARK H.S._at_
    WOLTERS STADIUM
  • 5/12/2005 N.S.C. CHAMPIONSHIPS _at_ WARREN _at_ WARREN
    H.S. O'PLAINE CAMPUS
  • 5/20/2005 IHSA SECTIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS
  • 5/27-28/2005 IHSA STATE MEET _at_ EIU CHARLESTON
  • 6/17-18/2005 Nike Outdoor National Championships

10
Applying Strategy to the 800 Meter Run
  • Running in lanes or alleys around the first curve
  • A fast, early pace
  • Passing
  • Staying out of boxes
  • Interruptions in pace

11
Running in lanes or alleys around the first curve
  • Runners behind at the break-line are at a
    disadvantage because they will have to run wide
    for much of the remainder of the race in order to
    move up and gain position on the leaders.
  • They should make the most of the situation by not
    breaking for lane 1 or 2 immediately from the
    outside lanes, and run a diagonal straight line
    to the next curve to minimize the extra distance
    they have to run and avoid the congestion in the
    inside lanes.

12
A fast, early pace
  • Tactically, a fast first 400-meters punishes an
    800/1600-type runner more than a 400/800-type
    runner because it is closer to their maximum
    400-meter speed.

13
Passing
  • Remember that half of this race is run on the
    curve! (More than half on wide-radius tracks.)
  • When passing, position on the outside shoulder of
    the runner ahead must be gained on the curve in
    order to move past on the straight and into the
    inside lane before the curve.

14
Staying out of boxes
  • The 800 is almost always a tightly-bunched race,
    so 800-meter runners have to be able to run in
    traffic.
  • When positioned in lane 1 behind the leaders,
    runners have to be wary of others coming up from
    behind on their outside shoulder and becoming
    "boxed-in".
  • In most cases, they are far better off running a
    few extra meters in lane 2 or 3 through the first
    300-400 meters until the field strings-out to
    avoid all the contact and boxing-in that tends to
    occur in the inside lanes.

15
Interruptions in pace
  • The biggest challenge facing an 800-meter runner
    is avoiding interruptions in pace.
  • A basic rule in the middle distance races (800
    and 1600-meters) is that a runner can only make
    TWO aggressive accelerations in a fast-paced
    race.
  • Runners who have to spend those two accelerations
    to recover from being tripped, pushed, cut-off or
    getting out of a box will find themselves
    stripped of the ability to accelerate once more
    at the end of the race.

16
APPLYING STRATEGY TO THE 1600-METERS
  • Since the 1930's when the world record stood at
    406, the "Magic of the Mile" lies in the
    opportunity it gives a front-runner to break away
    from the field. But since the middle stage of the
    race is relatively short, position runners who
    stay relatively close to the leaders can use
    superior speed to overtake them at the end

17
Front runners win by breaking away
  • The leaders of the race usually assume
    front-running positions and force the pace
    because they believe they are vulnerable to being
    beaten by faster finishers in a slow-paced race.
  • They want a fast-pace from the start so their
    opponents will fall behind or tire to the point
    of being unable to increase the pace at the end
    of the race.
  • If they have not been successful in gapping the
    field after 800-meters, they can employ some
    short bursts of faster running to initiate a
    break.
  • This tactic is called surging

18
Position runners win by maintaining contact with
the leaders
  • The first rule of position-running is, "Never
    lose contact with the leaders!
  • If successful, they can often use superior speed
    to overtake them at the finish.
  • This simple strategy is often complicated,
    however, by the fact that there are other runners
    in the race with the same plan.
  • In this case, another position-running strategy
    called a long finish can be effective.
  • The object of this tactic is to surprise the
    field by dramatically increasing the pace well
    before the finish . . . usually after about 1000
    meters . . . and is based on the premise that the
    front-runners will be demoralized by losing the
    lead, and that other position runners will lack
    the confidence (or toughness) to respond with so
    much distance remaining to the finish.

19
Final Thoughts
  • Some athletes are natural front-runners. Over the
    course of their entire careers, most coaches are
    fortunate to find 5 or 6 such runners who can
    dictate the pace of their races.
  • Despite the advantages we may attach to
    position-running tactics, we should not make the
    mistake of discouraging our runners from taking
    the lead and forcing the pace if that is where
    they feel most comfortable and in control in a
    race.

20
Long Conversational Runs
  • These are designed to improve your endurance and
    are the most important aspect of your training.
  • You should start out at a very relaxed effort to
    warm up properly for 2 miles and gradually settle
    into a relaxed pace that allows you to carry on a
    conversation. At this effort, your body will best
    be able to make the physiological adaptations to
    improve your endurance. Any faster and you will
    sacrifice building your endurance for building
    speed.
  • Make it a priority to drink plenty of fluids the
    day before, the day of and the day after long
    runs to reduce the amount of dehydration that
    will occur.
  • Be sure to stretch after the run, but plan to
    stretch more assertively the next day to help
    flush out the tightness.

21
Long Conversational Runs Aerobic Threshold - 10
to 20 miles at Home (No more than 20 of the
mileage for that week)
  • 2/27/2005
  • 3/06/2005
  • 3/13/2005
  • 3/20/2005
  • 3/27/2005
  • 4/03/2005
  • 4/10/2005
  • 4/17/2005
  • 4/24/2005
  • 5/01/2005
  • 5/08/2005
  • 5/15/2005
  • 5/22/2005

For example If you are running 50 miles a week
you can run 10 miles on Sunday or 60 miles 12
miles. To run a 20 mile Sunday you should be
running 100 miles a week.
22
VO2 Max Mile Repeats_at_ Big Bear Lake Goal 500
or faster
Steve Plasencia
Dr. Joe Vigil
  • 2/28/2005 1 X 1 Mile Run
  • 3/8/2005 2 X 1 Mile Run
  • 3/14/2005 3 X 1 Mile Run
  • 3/21/2005 4 X 1 Mile Run
  • 4/4/2005 5 X 1 Mile Run
  • 4/12/2005 6 X 1 Mile Run
  • 4/19/2005 5 X 1 Mile Run
  • 4/26/2005 4 X 1 Mile Run
  • 5/3/2005 3 X 1 Mile Run
  • 5/9/2005 2 X 1 Mile Run
  • 5/16/2005 1 X 1 Mile Run

23
Oregon Drill
  • 3/1/2005
  • 3/15/2005
  • 4/12/2005
  • 4/26/2005
  • 5/10/2005
  • 5/24/2005
  • 1000 Warmup Pace
  • 12 x 100 Alt. Easy/Medium/Hard
  • 1000 Medium Pace
  • 12x100 Alt. Easy/Medium/Hard
  • 1000 Hard Pace
  • 12x100 Alt. Easy/Medium/Hard
  • RUN CONTINUOUSLY!

Coach Bowerman
24
Nate Sweet 200s
  • 3/11/2005
  • 3/31/2005
  • Maybe More

25
Speed Endurance Training
  • 3/23/2005
  • 3/03/2005
  • 4/14/2005
  • 4/28/2005
  • Repeat this set three times
  • 200 Fast 30 sec
  • 200 Fast 30 sec
  • 400 Fast 60 sec
  • 200 Fast 30 sec
  • 3 min R.I. (200 Jog between each run 400
    between sets)

26
  • Frank Shorters
  • 2(6 X 200) Recovery 100 Jog in equal time
  • 15 X 200 Recovery 100 Jog in equal time
  • 3/03/2005
  • 1st Set Get out pace 2nd. Set Cutdowns
  • 3/08/2005
  • 5 Medium - 5 Medium/Hard - 5 Hard
  • 3/17/2005
  • 1st Set Get out pace 2nd. Set Cutdowns
  • 3/22/2005
  • 5 Medium - 5 Medium/Hard - 5 Hard
  • 4/05/2005
  • 5 Medium - 5 Medium/Hard - 5 Hard
  • 4/14/2005
  • 1st Set Get out pace 2nd. Set Cutdowns
  • 4/19/2005
  • 5 Medium - 5 Medium/Hard - 5 Hard
  • 4/28/2005
  • 1st Set Get out pace 2nd. Set Cutdowns
  • 5/03/2005
  • 5 Medium - 5 Medium/Hard - 5 Hard
  • 5/12/2005
  • 1st Set Get out pace 2nd. Set Cutdowns
  • 5/17/2005
  • 5 Medium - 5 Medium/Hard - 5 Hard

27
EMIL ZATOPEK
  • 3/16/2005 20 X 400 _at_ 1 min R.I. hold under 75
    sec.
  • 3/2/2005 20 X 400 _at_ 1 min R.I. hold under 75
    sec.
  • 3/30/2005 20 X 400 _at_ 1 min R.I. hold under 75
    sec.
  • 4/6/2005 20 X 400 _at_ 1 min R.I. hold under 75
    sec.
  • 5/4/2005 20 X 400 _at_ 1 min R.I. hold under 75 sec.

28
  • So revolutionary was Zatopek's training, so
    astonishing its intensity, and so phenomenal his
    racing results, that word of his daily regimen
    quickly outstripped its actuality. He was doing
    60x400 meters in 60 seconds, a workout that
    almost surely surpasses man's ability.
  • When people saw him racing, they were willing to
    believe almost anything. The sight of Zatopek on
    the track was positively riveting. No one has
    given freer vent to racing's agony. He tilted his
    head, furrowed his brow, wagged his tongue out of
    his mouth, rolled his shoulders, twisted his arms
    across his body, and appeared on the brink of an
    epileptic seizure.
  • It was the quantity of Zatopek's interval
    training that produced results. His training for
    the 1948 London Olympic Games, in which he won
    the 10,000 meters, consisted of daily workouts of
    5 x 200 meters, 20 x 400 meters and 5 x200
    meters.
  • Immediately prior to the London Games, Zatopek
    ran 60 x 400 meters for 10 days in a row.
  • Four years later, feeling that he needed even
    more training to ensure a triple victory in
    Helsinki, Zatopek began running 5 x 100 meters,
    20 x 400 meters and 5 x 100 meters twice a day.

29
Steve Prefontaine
  • Some people create with words or with music or
    with a brush and paints. I like to make something
    beautiful when I run. I like to make people stop
    and say, 'I've never seen anyone run like that
    before.' It's more than just a race, it's a
    style. It's doing something better than anyone
    else. It's being creative."
  • "A lot of people run a race to see who is
    fastest. I run to see who has the most guts, who
    can punish himself into exhausting pace, and then
    at the end, punish himself even more. Nobody is
    going to win a 5,000 meter race after running an
    easy 2 miles. Not with me. If I lose forcing the
    pace all the way, well, at least I can live with
    myself."
  • "To give anything less than your best is to
    sacrifice the Gift."
  • "I don't just go out there and run. I like to
    give people watching something exciting."
  • "Something inside of me just said 'Hey, wait a
    minute, I want to beat him,' and I just took
    off."

30
Steve Prefontaine
  • "What I want is to be number one."
  • "Somebody may beat me, but they are going to have
    to bleed to do it."
  • "I'm going to work so that it's a pure guts race
    at the end, and if it is, I am the only one who
    can win it."
  • "How does a kid from Coos Bay, with one leg
    longer than the other win races? All my life
    people have been telling me, 'You're too small
    Pre', 'You're not fast enough Pre', 'Give up your
    foolish dream Steve'. But they forgot something,
    I HAVE TO WIN."
  • "A race is a work of art that people can look at
    and be affected in as many ways theyre capable
    of understanding."
  • "You have to wonder at times what you're doing
    out there. Over the years, I've given myself a
    thousand reasons to keep running, but it always
    comes back to where it started. It comes down to
    self-satisfaction and a sense of achievement."

31
LACTATE TOLERANCE TRAINING
  • 2/25/2005
  • 3/18/2005
  • 3/04/2005
  • 4/01/2005
  • 4/08/2005
  • 1200 mtr even paced run
  • 4 mile tempo run
  • 1200 mtr run descend the 400's 1-3 (drop time on
    each 400)
  • The second 1200 simulates the finish of a hard
    race
  • Continuous

32
  • 3/10/2005
  • 3/24/2005
  • 4/21/2005
  • 4/07/2005
  • 5/19/2005
  • 5/05/2005
  • 10 X 100
  • 60 Buildup (Make each stride faster than the
    last)
  • 20 Maximum Speed (ALL OUT)
  • 20 Float (The legs should move easily under the
    body like a wheel rolling smoothly along)
  • Jog (REST) Curves after each 100

33
VO2 Max Training
  • 2/24/2005
  • 3/24/2005
  • 4/21/2005
  • 4/7/2005
  • 5/5/2005
  • 2(3X300) (40)
  • 200 jog in 40 sec after each 300
  • 3 Minutes Active Rest after set 1 and 2 and
    before the final set (Jog)
  • 6 X 300 (45)
  • 200 jog in 40 sec after each 300

34
Running Form
  • Run Tall This means erect, running with full
    extension of the back, hips and legs as opposed
    to 'sitting down' when running
  • Run with a relaxed action This means move
    easily, as opposed to tensing and 'working hard'
    to move. Let the movements of running flow. Keep
    the hands relaxed, the shoulders low and the arm
    swing rhythmically by the sides.
  • Run Smoothly This means float across the top of
    the ground. All motion should be forward, not up
    and down. Leg action should be efficient and
    rhythmic. The legs should move easily under the
    body like a wheel rolling smoothly along.
  • Drive Push from an extended rear leg, rear
    elbow drive with a forward knee drive followed by
    a strike and claw foot action just behind the
    body's centre of gravity.

35
Saturday Road TripsLong Conversational Hilly
Runsex Kettle Moraine, Vet Acres, etc.
  • 04/09/2005
  • 04/16/2005
  • 04/23/2005
  • 04/30/2005
  • 03/12/2005
  • 03/19/2005
  • 03/26/2005
  • 04/02/2005

36
  • 3/1/2005
  • 3/15/2005
  • 3/22/2005
  • 4/13/2005
  • 4/20/2005
  • 4/27/2005
  • 4/5/2005
  • 5/11/2005
  • 5/18/2005
  • Run Tempo 7 to 10 miles at Half Day

37
Various Distance Runs
  • 3/28/2005 12 Mile Tempo Run _at_ Veterans Acres in
    Crystal Lake
  • 3/7/2005 12 Mile Tempo Run _at_ Veterans Acres in
    Crystal Lake
  • 4/2/2005 Independance Grove to Half Day Time Trial

38
Summer Training
  • 6/15-18/2005 Flathead Distance Camp, Big Fork,
    Montana
  • 6/20-23/2005 Flathead Distance Camp, Big Fork,
    Montana
  • 7/9-11/2005 Coach Schauble USA Track Field
    Level III Endurance School

39
Flathead Distance Camp
  • The Flathead Lake Camp is one of the best camps
    in the Northwest and the price is right at only
    150.00.
  • Campers will be transported by van to run on some
    of the most beautiful trails in the area.
  • Educational sessions will feature such topics as
    goal setting, team building, motivation,
    nutrition, and training ideas.
  • Runners of high school age with differing
    abilities are welcome.
  • Because of the interest in this camp you are
    encouraged to contact Bill or Sara Brist as soon
    as possible to make reservations for the camp
    date which best fits your schedule
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