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PowerPoint Etiquette

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Brown backgrounds are perceived as the presentation of passive information ... Black backgrounds indicate power and sophistication ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: PowerPoint Etiquette


1
PowerPoint Etiquette
  • What works in the world of presentationscolor,
    fonts, and transitions

2
Created by Kathy SchrockAdministrator for
TechnologyNauset Public SchoolsOrleans MA
  • Based on research in
  • the area of visual design

3
Introduction to color
4
Colors per slide
  • No more than four colors per slide
  • Too busy if use more
  • Viewers dont know why you are using color
  • The viewers dont know what is important and
    highlighted if you use lots of colors

5
Colors per slide
  • No more than four colors per slide
  • Too busy if use more
  • Viewers dont know why you are using color
  • The viewers dont know what is important and
    highlighted if you use lots of colors

6
Colors for type and background
7
Colors to use
  • Light yellow on a blue background
  • White on a black background
  • Black on a light yellow background
  • Black on a white background may be too bright

8
Colors to use
  • Light yellow on a blue background
  • White on a black background
  • Black on a light yellow background
  • Black on a white background may be
  • too bright

9
Colors to use
  • Light yellow on a blue background
  • White on a black background
  • Black on a light yellow background
  • Black on a white background may be
  • too bright

10
Colors to use
  • Light yellow on a blue background
  • White on a black background
  • Black on a light yellow background
  • Black on a white background may be
  • too bright

11
Other color information
12
Other color information
  • Dont use red for text
  • It is hard to see and read

13
Other color information
  • Avoid red on a green background
  • Colorblind viewers will have difficulty

14
Other color information
  • For gradients, think earth to sky
  • Darker colors on bottom and lighter on top

15
Other color information
  • Red backgrounds stimulate emotion
  • Use burgundy instead

16
Other color information
  • Red backgrounds stimulate emotion
  • Use burgundy instead

17
Other color information
  • Green backgrounds make the viewer feel
    involvement with the topic

18
Other color information
  • Gray backgrounds make the viewer feel that the
    information shows a lack of commitment or
    neutrality

19
Other color information
  • Blue backgrounds indicate a calm, conservative
    message

20
Other color information
  • Yellow backgrounds indicate hope for the future
    and cheerfulness

21
Other color information
  • Purple backgrounds give the feeling of fantasy or
    are perceived as child-like
  • Save purple for the lighter topics

22
Other color information
  • Brown backgrounds are perceived as the
    presentation of passive information
  • Viewers feel that information on brown
    backgrounds is less stable

23
Other color information
  • Black backgrounds indicate power and
    sophistication
  • Ideal for presenting information that the
    audience has no choice but to accept
  • fixed budget figures
  • student enrollment

24
Information about fonts
25
Information about fonts
  • Type can express moods and emotions
    as well as images can
  • Type can be serious and business-like
  • Type can be relaxed and open
  • Dont let the typeface contradict your message
  • No more than 3 fonts in no more than 4 sizes
    during a presentation

26
Font details Serif fonts
  • Serif fonts
  • tiny horizontal or vertical lines at the ends
    of longer line strokes
  • The serifs help the eye move across the text
  • Good for large blocks of text
  • Examples of serif fonts
  • Bookman
  • Garamond
  • Times New Roman

27
Font details Sans-serif fonts
  • Sans-serif fonts
  • NO tiny horizontal or vertical lines at the
    ends of longer line strokes
  • Simple strokes of equal weight and thickness
  • Good for headlines but not lots of text
  • Examples of serif fonts
  • Arial
  • Comic Sans
  • Eras Medium

28
Fonts can express a mood
  • Comic sans is a gentle font
  • BettysHand is very relaxed
  • Diner makes you think of the 1950s
  • Tinkertoy is a good elementary font
  • Schools often use the Kids font
  • Century Schoolbook is a formal font
  • Dont let the font become distracting!

29
Fonts can be congruent with the theme
30
How much text
  • Use the general 6x6 rule
  • No more than six words across
  • No more than six bullet points
  • Words are considered markers
  • Text needs to include keywords only

31
HOW ABOUT CAPITAL LETTERS?
  • Make limited use of all capital letters
  • Our eyes need to capture the shapes of the
    letters above and below the line
  • Words in all capital letters have nearly the same
    visual shape
  • What does this say.

32
IUMRING TO GQNGIUSIOQNS
33
IUMRING TO GQNGIUSIOQNS
34
Information on transitions
35
Information about transitions
  • Good transitions can
  • Help tie your presentation together
  • Make it flow smoothly between ideas
  • Signal important ideas to get the audiences
    attention

36
Technical aspects of transitions
  • Transition effects can be used with images,
    tables, charts, and graphs
  • Can add movement to
  • slices of a pie chart
  • bars in a bar chart
  • rows in a table
  • levels in an organization chart

37
Types of transitions
38
Blinds
  • The new slide is unveiled in a series of
    horizontal or vertical rows, similar to the
    effect of opening the blinds of a window

39
Boxes
  • The new slide "grows" from the middle of the
    previous slide, or grows inward from the edges of
    the screen

40
Checkerboards
  • The new slide appears over the previous slide as
    a series of boxes

41
Dissolves
  • An advanced case of checkerboards, where the new
    screen is unveiled in numerous small boxes or
    other graphic elements

42
Wipes
  • The new slide replaces the previous slide from
    left to right, top to bottom, or diagonally

43
Flash bulb
  • Slide title flashes to get the audiences
    attention

44
Splits
  • The new slide expands horizontally or vertically
    from the center of the screen

45
Fade in and dim
  • Points in a text chart are highlighted one point
    at a time
  • This prevents your audience from reading ahead of
    you
  • Focuses their attention on the point you're
    discussing
  • Dims previously introduced points

46
Using a transition in a diagram
47
Choosing the right transition
  • Should be based on
  • your message
  • your audience
  • the computer hardware
  • the length of the presentation

48
Tips for transitions
  • Your transitions should reflect the basic feeling
    of your presentation
  • Consider the formality of your presentation and
    the expectations of your audience
  • Remember that it takes a more powerful computer
    to use transitions

49
Tips for transitions
  • It may be annoying when the same transitions are
    used over and over
  • It may be annoying when too many different types
    of transitions are used
  • Use transitions to chunk your information

50
The End
51
Background on transitions
52
Information about transitions
  • Good transitions can
  • Help tie your presentation together
  • Make it flow smoothly between ideas
  • Signal important ideas to get the audiences
    attention

53
Technical aspects of transitions
  • Transition effects can be used with images,
    tables, charts, and graphs
  • Can add movement to
  • slices of a pie chart
  • bars in a bar chart
  • rows in a table
  • levels in an organization chart

54
Types of transitions
55
Blinds
  • The new slide is unveiled in a series of
    horizontal or vertical rows, similar to the
    effect of opening the blinds of a window

56
Boxes
  • The new slide "grows" from the middle of the
    previous slide, or grows inward from the edges of
    the screen

57
Checkerboards
  • The new slide appears over the previous slide as
    a series of boxes

58
Dissolves
  • An advanced case of checkerboards, where the new
    screen is unveiled in numerous small boxes or
    other graphic elements

59
Wipes
  • The new slide replaces the previous slide from
    left to right, top to bottom, or diagonally

60
Flash bulb
  • Slide title flashes to get the audiences
    attention

61
Splits
  • The new slide expands horizontally or vertically
    from the center of the screen

62
Fade in and dim
  • Points in a text chart are highlighted one point
    at a time
  • This prevents your audience from reading ahead of
    you
  • Focuses their attention on the point you're
    discussing
  • Dims previously introduced points

63
Using a transition in a diagram
64
Choosing the right transition
  • Should be based on
  • your message
  • your audience
  • the computer hardware
  • the length of the presentation

65
Tips for transitions
  • Your transitions should reflect the basic feeling
    of your presentation
  • Consider the formality of your presentation and
    the expectations of your audience.
  • Remember that it takes a more powerful computer
    to use transitions

66
Tips for transitions
  • It may be annoying when the same transitions are
    used over and over
  • It may be annoying when too many different types
    of transitions are used
  • Use transitions to chunk your information

67
The End
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