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Alliance for Regional Stewardship THE ENVISION UTAH EXPERIENCE: CHALLENGES, PROGRESS, AND LESSONS

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Title: Alliance for Regional Stewardship THE ENVISION UTAH EXPERIENCE: CHALLENGES, PROGRESS, AND LESSONS


1
Alliance for Regional Stewardship THE ENVISION
UTAH EXPERIENCE CHALLENGES, PROGRESS, AND
LESSONS
  • Fall Forum
  • Salt Lake City, Utah
  • November 11, 2004

Presented by Robert J. Grow, Sr. Counsel,
OMelveny Myers and Founding Chair Emeritus,
Envision Utah (rgrow_at_omm.com)
2
Regional Visioning
  • Growing National Phenomenon
  • Revolution in Scale-Appropriate Urban
    Problem Solving
  • New Science
  • New Governance Structures
  • New Public Engagement Methods
  • New Tools for Analyzing the Future
  • Existing Tools Used in New Ways
  • New Communication Technologies

3
Regional Visioning Requires In-Depth
Understanding of . . .
  • The interaction and modeling of land uses and
    regional transportation systems
  • Air shed and air quality modeling
  • Water consumption projections and modeling by
    development type and density
  • Local and regional infrastructure costs (both
    private and public) based on development type and
    density
  • Regional housing supply and demand trends
    (affordability challenges, demand for apartments,
    condos, and townhouses, etc.)

4
Regional Visioning is the Natural Evolution of
Place Making to a Larger Scale
5
Regional Visioning through Analysis of Future
Alternative Scenarios or Visions Empowers Wise
Decision-making in the Face of Uncertainty
6
Regional Visioning Objective
  • To help the public and todays decision makers
    understand the consequences of their choices by
    developing and analyzing high-level, long-term,
    alternative, scenarios or visions for a region

7
The Visioning Process
  • Is guided by a large, trusted, and diverse group
    of regional stakeholders
  • Is committed to finding the common ground and
    serving the public good
  • Uses regional scenarios to provide the public
    with clear choices about the future
  • Develops goals and implements strategies to
    achieve the publics vision

8
Inputs into Visioning Process A Values Analysis
identifies and prioritizes the most significant
attributes of a future urban environment that
best satisfies fundamental human needs and serves
enduring human values A Constraints Analysis
provides the real-world context (physical, legal,
and market) that grounds the visioning process in
reality
9
Begin Visioning with Human Values
10
Why Start With Values?
  • Values are stable and enduring lifes tides as
    opposed to the waves.
  • Values are widely shared and create consensus
    among diverse groups.
  • The desire to satisfy ones values is the
    foundation of personal decision making.
  • A place that meets the needs and satisfies the
    values of people can last for generations.

11
Why Start With Values?
  • Long-term market forces are values based and
    values driven.
  • Fads and trends fade, but values provide the best
    window on multi-generational market demand

12
Objective of the Values Analysis Determine and
prioritize the attributes of future urban
environments that will best satisfy fundamental
human needs, serve enduring human values, and
drive long-term market demand. Values guide the
selection and analysis of future scenarios
13
Analysis of Constraints
14
Key Constraints
  • Physical Constraints of the Region (natural
    resources, critical lands, slopes, soils,
    mountains, lakes and rivers, and man-made
    infrastructure and facilities).
  • Legal Constraints concerning intensity of use,
    infrastructure, and environment.
  • Market Constraints driven by regional demand for
    jobs, housing, recreation, etc.

15
Constraints Analysis Physical
  • Man-made and natural conditions limit
    sustainable development capacity
  • future infrastructure capacity limited by
    connectivity to and capacity of present and
    future transportation systems water and sewer
    systems gas, electric, communication and other
    utilities etc.
  • developable areas limited by rivers, wetlands,
    and sensitive ecosystems, foundation capacity of
    soils wildlife habitat etc.
  • intensity of use limited by availability of
    sufficient clean water allowable air emissions
    in light of atmospheric conditions percolation
    rates for storm water runoff etc.

16
Constraints Analysis Legal
  • Federal, State and local laws create processes
    and substantive requirements for
  • infrastructure (e.g., transportation systems
    water and sewer systems gas, electric,
    communication and other utilities)
  • environment (e.g., air quality drinking water
    quality storm runoff and sewer effluent
    preservation of rivers, wetlands and sensitive
    ecosystems endangered species)
  • intensity of use (e.g., zoning for number,
    density and location of residential, commercial,
    industrial, and civic uses impact fees and
    exactions urban growth boundaries limit
    development timing)

17
Constraints Analysis Market
  • Long-term demand for jobs, housing, and
    recreation in the State and Region will
    constrain development

18
Creating and Comparing Scenarios
  • The desired attributes of the future human
    environment and the constraints to creating that
    environment guide the brainstorming and selection
    of future visions/scenarios to be modeled and
    evaluated
  • Those same attributes and constraints create the
    yard stick or standards by which future
    scenarios are compared in establishing a future
    strategy

19
Visioning Process Inputs
Priority of Desirable Attributes of Future Human
Environment
VALUES ANALYSIS
Visioning Scenarios
Limiting Constraints on Future Regional
Development
CONSTRAINTS ANALYSIS
20
Why Develop a Vision?
  • Visioning focuses on finding the best outcomes
    from the possible choices, and leads to
    strategies that really work
  • Visioning exposes opportunities and risks, and
    empowers proactive responses
  • Visioning identifies key variables of success and
    focuses resources on the highest priorities
  • Visioning brings people together, builds
    consensus, and creates sustainable momentumit
    negates NIMBYism

21
Regional Visioning
  • Has one foot in memory and one foot in prophecy
    by exploring common heritage and history to
    strengthen regional identity
  • Builds consensus for a common future founded upon
    widely-held, deeply-felt, values, desires, hopes
    and aspirations
  • Creates civic capacity in both the public and the
    regional leaders to implement strategies for a
    better future

22
Envision Utah A Regional Visioning Example
  • 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization
  • Formed in 1997 to evaluate growth issues
  • 85 of funding comes from private sources

23
Serious Challenges
  • Adding a million residents by 2020
  • Urbanizing 87 more land by 2020
  • Needing new water sources by 2010
  • Risking increases in air pollution
  • Worsening crowding and congestion
  • Increasing costs for businesses and families
  • Rising infrastructure needs

24
Greater Wasatch Area
  • 10 Counties
  • 90 Cities and Towns
  • 157 Special Service Districts

Over 500 City Council Members Over 500 Planning
Commissioners 30 County Commissioners 90
Mayors 100s of developers, realtors and other
key stakeholders
25
History of Planning in Utah
26
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27
5 million people by 2050
28
The Premise
  • The public has the right to choose its
    futurepublic officials should serve that vision
  • Growth issues have natural boundaries that are
    not aligned with existing political boundaries

29
Broad Scope of Community Interests Represented
  • Business Leaders
  • Developers
  • Utility Companies
  • Local Government
  • State Government
  • Conservation and Citizen Groups
  • Religious Leaders
  • Education
  • Media

30
Who Can Best Deal With Growth Issues?
People Like You And Me
42
State Government
20
Local Government
18
Businesses In Utah
14
Other Organizations/Institutions
3
Don't Know/Refused
3
n400
31
SCENARIOS
  • Give the Public Choices from Alternate Future
    Visions

32
Scenario Approach Contrasts todays choices by
showing long-term consequences
33
Develop a Range of Scenarios
Dispersed Pattern
Compact Pattern
Corridor Pattern
Satellite Pattern
34
Traditional Planning Approach
  • Decide through analysis and research
  • Educate the public about the solution
  • Announce the plan
  • Defend the plan and yourself

35
Traditional Planning Approach
  • D
  • E
  • A
  • D

36

Public Workshops
  • Hundreds of meetings with thousands of
    participants

37
Major Public Workshop Findings
  • Infill -- Participants preferred greater
    population numbers in infill areas than new
    expansion
  • Wasatch Back -- Nearly all participants indicated
    that only minimal development should occur in the
    Wasatch Back
  • Rail Transit -- Rail was seen as an essential
    component of the regions growth
  • Walkable -- Participants expressed a general
    preference for walkable development
  • Critical Lands -- Near general consensus that
    critical lands should be conserved

Design
38
Give me a lever long enough . . . and I shall
move the world.
  • (Archimedes)

The Transportation System is the Longest Lever
that creates a Regions future urban form
39
Regional Choices and Outcomes
Transportation
Land Use
Housing Opportunities
Job Creation
Land Consumption
Water Use
Open Space
Air Quality
Miles of Driving
Traffic
40
Scenario A New and Existing Development
  • Continuation of Recent Trends
  • Larger lot sizes
  • More auto-oriented development will occur.

41
Scenario B New and Existing Development
Baseline - implement adopted plans Dispersed
development pattern common in last 20-30 years
42
Scenario C New and Existing Development
  • More infill and redevelopment
  • Growth on new land focused into
  • walkable, transit-oriented
  • communities

43
Scenario D New and Existing Development
  • Significant increase in densities
  • Extensive infill and redevelopment
  • Extensive transit system

44
Land Consumption
Analysis
45

46
Vehicle Miles of Travel Per Day
47
Total Emissions Tons Per Day
48
Housing Mix Current and 2020
49
Total Infrastructure Costs
50
PUBLIC AWARENESS EFFORTS
Television, Radio and Newspaper
51
Choosing a Scenario (weighted vs. unweighted
results)
Unweighted results (as represented by the black
dashed line) are nearly identical to weighted
results
52
QUALITY GROWTH STATEGY Six Goals, 42 Strategies
  • Enhance Air Quality
  • Increase Mobility Transportation Choices
  • Preserve Critical Lands
  • Conserve Water Resources
  • Provide Housing Opportunities
  • Maximize Efficiency in Public Infrastructure
    Investments

53
Envision Utah is Leading Change in Local and
Regional Growth Patterns
54
Utahs Public Transportation
Q11 What is your impression of public
transportation SINCE the development of light
rail, often referred to as Trax, in Salt Lake
County?
Q13 Do you favor or oppose the EXPANSION of
light rail, often referred to as Trax, and other
public transportation systems?
Trax Opinion
Trax Expansion
Total Favor 88
Total Positive 76
Total Negative 9
Total Oppose 10
55
Future Transit
  • 185 million acquisition
  • Purchased 175 miles of rail right-of-way
  • Created nine future transit corridors

56
The Long Range Plan is an Integrated Road and
Transit Plan
  • A Complete Mobility System
  • We
  • Need Both

57
Ambitious 2030 Transit Plan
58
Utahs Housing Options
Q8 Do you favor or oppose that each community,
including yours, should have housing options that
accommodate income levels for police officers,
school teachers, nurses, and fire-fighters?
Q7 Do you favor or oppose building a variety of
housing options such as town homes, condos and
apartments in your community to accommodate the
increased number of young and older Utahns?
Housing Income Accommodations
Housing Age Accommodations
Total Favor 75
Total Favor 80
Total Oppose 23
Total Oppose 17
59
Estimated Statistics between Salt Lake, Davis and
Weber Counties acres within ½ mile of transit
nodes 80,000 Housing units within ½ mile
transit nodes _at_ 8 DU/acre on half of the acres
320,000 units Population estimate _at_ 3 persons
per household 960,000 80,000 Acres 125
Square Miles
60
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61
West Valley Downtown/ TOD
A
B
C
D
62
Preferred Scenario
63
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64
Mountain View Corridor EIS (2003-04)
  • 17 cities and townships
  • 2 counties

65
Where were headed
  • 270,000 additional residents by 2030
  • 100 increase

66
Participants
67
MVC considers development and transportation
together
  • Future land use is not fixed
  • Communities are asked to consider the land use
    changes they would be willing to make to support
    different transportation solutions

68
Mountain View Vision and Voluntary Agreement
  • 10 Jurisdictions
  • 15 additional Stakeholders

69
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70
THE NEXT ROUND of VISIONING
71

Continuing to Build the Vision 2004 - 2006
  • Scenario visioning integrated with next
  • long range transportation plan

72
Wasatch Choices 2040
  • A Comprehensive Land Use and Transportation
    Visioning Process

73
Growth in Utah will Continue Envision Utah is
Working to Keep Utah Beautiful, Prosperous and
Neighborly for Future Generations
74
Communicating a Vision to the Public
75
(No Transcript)
76
(No Transcript)
77
(No Transcript)
78
Transit Increases Capacity in Corridors
  • …

79
Layton, UT Main Street
80
Layton, UT Main Street
81
Layton, UT Main Street
82
DIVIDER 4
83
Values Example from Envision Utah
84
Communicating Choices for Regional Growth using
VISTA ( Values In Strategy Assessment)
85
Personal Values
  • Self-Esteem
  • Personal Satisfaction
  • Sense of Accomplishment
  • Security
  • Care for Others
  • Peace of Mind
  • Enjoyment / Enjoy Life
  • Happiness
  • Personal Freedom and Control
  • Take Care of Family
  • Longevity
  • Concern for Future Generations
  • Belonging
  • Trust
  • Sharing with Others
  • Self-Fulfillment
  • Sanctity of Life
  • Pride
  • Love
  • Self-Preservation
  • Preserve the Earth
  • Eternal Life / God
  • Respect
  • Self-Image

86
Why Values Are Important for Visioning
Ideal to inspire to DO something
  • They are motivational

Ideal to build coalitions-- expand our base and
reach out
  • Widely shared

Ideal for continuity throughout A
project--umbrella theme
  • Stable, enduring

87
Wirthlin Values Research - May 1997
Peace of Mind
Self Esteem
Personal Enjoyment
Personal Security
Accomplishment
Freedom
Personal and Community Enrichment
Personal Time and Opportunities
Safe and Secure Environment
Financial Security
Business and job opportunities
Open Space
Crowding
Travel time
Learning opportunity School Quality
Income levels
Crime
Institutions that foster good values
Leisure activity accessibility
Sense of community
Affordable living
Shared ideas, values, morals
Natural systems
Personal health
Traffic safety accidents
Taxation
Cultural Opportunities
88
Life in Utah
Peace of Mind
PERSONAL VALUES
Self Esteem
Personal Enjoyment
Self Satisfaction
Personal Security
Self Esteem
Family Love
Accomplishment
Freedom
Makes Me Happy
PSYCHO-SOCIAL CONSEQUENCES
Better Quality of Life
Get Along With Others
In Control
Feel Healthy
Do a Better Job
Less Worry
Less Stress
Spend Time With Family
Feel Good
Feel Safe
Do Other Things
Buy Other Things
Commonly Held Ideas
Become a Victim of Crime
FUNCTIONAL CONSEQUENCES
Children Handle Lifes Problems
Save Time
Will (Not) Be Sick
More Crowds
More Car Accidents
Save Money
Children Learn More
Gain Knowledge
Have More Choices
Affordable Living
Crime
Climate
ATTRIBUTES
Educational System
LDS Church
Outdoor Recreation
Air Quality
High Income Level
Population Growth
Good Place for Family/Children
Traffic
Taxes
Scenic Beauty
Infrastructure
The People
89
Safe and Secure Environment Gateway Value
(34)
Peace of Mind
Self Esteem
Personal Enjoyment
Self Satisfaction
Personal Security
Self Esteem
PERSONAL VALUES
Family Love
Accomplishment
Freedom
Makes Me Happy
PSYCHO-SOCIAL CONSEQUENCES
Better Quality of Life
Get Along With Others
In Control
Feel Healthy
Do a Better Job
Less Worry
Less Stress
Spend Time With Family
Feel Good
Feel Safe
Do Other Things
Buy Other Things
Commonly Held Ideas
Become a Victim of Crime
FUNCTIONAL CONSEQUENCES
Children Handle Lifes Problems
Save Time
Will (Not) Be Sick
More Crowds
More Car Accidents
Save Money
Children Learn More
Gain Knowledge
Have More Choices
Affordable Living
Crime
ATTRIBUTES
Climate
Educational System
LDS Church
Outdoor Recreation
Air Quality
High Income Level
Population Growth
Good Place for Family/Children
Traffic
Taxes
Scenic Beauty
Infrastructure
The People
90
Safe and Secure Environment
(34)
Peace of Mind
Personal Security
Less Worry
Feel Safe
Commonly Held Ideas
Become a Victim of Crime
More Crowds
Crime
Population Growth
The People
90
91
Personal and Community Enrichment Gateway Value
(31)
Peace of Mind
Self Esteem
Personal Enjoyment
Self Satisfaction
Personal Security
Self Esteem
PERSONAL VALUES
Family Love
Accomplishment
Freedom
Makes Me Happy
PSYCHO-SOCIAL CONSEQUENCES
Better Quality of Life
Get Along With Others
In Control
Feel Healthy
Do a Better Job
Less Worry
Less Stress
Spend Time With Family
Feel Good
Feel Safe
Do Other Things
Buy Other Things
Commonly Held Ideas
Become a Victim of Crime
FUNCTIONAL CONSEQUENCES
Children Handle Lifes Problems
Save Time
Will (Not) Be Sick
More Crowds
More Car Accidents
Save Money
Children Learn More
Gain Knowledge
Have More Choices
Affordable Living
Crime
ATTRIBUTES
Climate
Educational System
LDS Church
Outdoor Recreation
Air Quality
High Income Level
Population Growth
Good Place for Family/Children
Traffic
Taxes
Scenic Beauty
Infrastructure
The People
92
Personal and Community Enrichment
(31)
92
93
Personal Time and Opportunity
(21)
Peace of Mind
PERSONAL VALUES
Self Esteem
Personal Enjoyment
Self Satisfaction
Personal Security
Self Esteem
Family Love
Accomplishment
Freedom
Makes Me Happy
PSYCHO-SOCIAL CONSEQUENCES
Better Quality of Life
Get Along With Others
In Control
Feel Healthy
Do a Better Job
Less Worry
Less Stress
Spend Time With Family
Feel Good
Feel Safe
Do Other Things
Buy Other Things
Commonly Held Ideas
Become a Victim of Crime
FUNCTIONAL CONSEQUENCES
Children Handle Lifes Problems
Save Time
Will (Not) Be Sick
More Crowds
More Car Accidents
Save Money
Children Learn More
Gain Knowledge
Have More Choices
Affordable Living
Crime
ATTRIBUTES
Climate
Educational System
LDS Church
Outdoor Recreation
Air Quality
High Income Level
Population Growth
Good Place for Family/Children
Traffic
Taxes
Scenic Beauty
Infrastructure
The People
94
Financial Security
(14)
Peace of Mind
PERSONAL VALUES
Self Esteem
Personal Enjoyment
Self Satisfaction
Personal Security
Self Esteem
Family Love
Accomplishment
Freedom
Makes Me Happy
PSYCHO-SOCIAL CONSEQUENCES
Better Quality of Life
Get Along With Others
Feel Healthy
Provide Care for Family
Do a Better Job
Less Worry
Less Stress
In Control
Spend Time With Family
Feel Good
Feel Safe
Do Other Things
Buy Other Things
Commonly Held Ideas
Become a Victim of Crime
FUNCTIONAL CONSEQUENCES
Children Handle Lifes Problems
Save Time
Will (Not) Be Sick
More Crowds
More Car Accidents
Save Money
Children Learn More
Gain Knowledge
Have More Choices
Affordable Living
Crime
ATTRIBUTES
Climate
Educational System
Taxes
High Income Level
Employment Opportunities
Air Quality
Population Growth
Good Place for Family/Children
Traffic
Employment Opportunities
Business Opportunities
Infrastructure
Business Opportunities
The People
95
Communicating with Values
  • Persuade with Reason
  • Motivate with Emotion

96
Decline in Housing Affordability
(Utah 1990-2000)
Persuading with Reason
3.2
2.3
Source GOPB
97
New Housing Units (1996-2002) 52 Utah Cities
Over 5,000 Population
40
16
24
Persuading with Reason
98
Projected Housing Supply in 2020 will not Meet
Demand
Persuading with Reason
Source Greater Wasatch Area Housing Analysis,
ECONorthwest 1999
99
Motivating with Emotion
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