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ESCOPACOP Leadership Development Program

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Title: ESCOPACOP Leadership Development Program


1
ESCOP/ACOP Leadership Development Program
  • Class 11
  • Phase II Reports

2
Sandra Ristow
  • Washington State University

3
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4
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5
P. Gregory Smith
  • USDA - CSREES

6
Enhanced Grant InformationP. Gregory Smith
USDA-CSREES
  • Issue Efficiently provide new grant program
    information to novice applicant community
  • Approach Interview Agency Grant Specialists and
    prospective applicants to determine most
    frequently cited application problems and issues
    Develop responses via most effective delivery
    method (Web Page)
  • Product FAQ Web page established on Agency
    server Interactive Q/A feature planned
  • http//www.reeusda.gov/1700/funding/spec_faq.htm

7
SAMPLE
FAQ Categories 1.     Eligibility2.    
Funding3.     Budget4.     Proposal Preparation
  • 1.   Eligibility
  • Q Whos eligible to submit proposals for the
    Higher Education Challenge (HEC) Grants Program?
  • A Land-grant colleges and universities and
    other U.S. public or private, nonprofit colleges
    and universities
  • Offering a baccalaureate degree or any other
    higher degree, and
  • Having a significant ongoing commitment to the
    teaching of food and agricultural sciences
    generally and to the specific need and/or subject
    area(s)

8
Leland Pierson, III
  • University of Arizona

9
ESCOP/ACOP Leadership Course
Phase II Internship
Leland (Sandy) Pierson III
The University of Arizona
Goal Understand the organization, hierarchy and
decision-making process in the
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS)
at The University of Arizona, a land
grant university
Approach Participate in the weekly CALS
executive council
Participate in Curriculum Committee
Observe Cooperative Extension activities
Interviews Executive Council Department Heads
Results Have a much deeper understanding of the
people, problems, solutions, and
the decision making process in CALS
10
Provost
Vice Provost Dean
Academic Programs
Experiment Station
Administrative Services
Cooperative Extension
Cooperative Extension
Teaching
Curriculum
9 Expt. Stations
Advising
AZ County Directors
Academic Units
Scholarships
Research
Career Services
Recruitment/Hiring
Compensation
Dept. Heads
Sponsored Projects
Native American Programs
Employee Development
Environ./Natural Resources
Family, Youth Community
Nutrition Health
Family finance
Marketing
4 H
Dean Gene Sander
Vice Dean Colin Kaltenbach
Assoc. Dean Jim Christenson
Assoc. Dean Dave Cox
Assoc. Dean Gordon Johnson
Asst. Dean Alma Sperr
CALS Executive Council
11
Mary Duryea
  • University of Florida

12
Mary Duryea (Univ. of FL) worked as Interim
Assistant Dean for Research
Her mentor was Richard Jones, Dean for Research
  • Her responsibilities included

Tenure and Promotion
Program Reviews
Grant Programs With Industry
Interviews For Faculty Searches
Intern Programs
Part-Time Appointments
Outside Consulting
13
Leadership Qualities That She Learned About Were
Managing Time Effectively
Active Listening
Delegating
Planning
Maintaining A Sense of Humor
Accepting Input
Understanding Conflict
14
Gerard E. DSouza
  • West Virginia University

15
Gerard DSouza, West Virginia University Mentor
Dr. Bill Vinson, Experiment Station Director
Improve my understanding of the LGU system the
Expt. Station research agenda and the
administrative decision-making process
(accomplished by attending administrative and
research-related meetings at various levels of
the university making presentations at some of
these meetings and assuming committee-chair
leadership positions in the College)
16
Gain a better understanding of the role of farms
and forests in a LGU setting, including
strategies that would justify their continued
use and support in an era of tight budgets
(accomplished by reviewing available literature,
and informal discussions or interviews with
stakeholders inside and out of the Experiment
Station an ongoing process)
17
Michael A. Schuett
  • West Virginia University

18
Michael A. SchuettWest Virginia University
  • ESCOP/ACOP Project
  • Reviewed College Recruitment Policies, Programs,
    and Materials

19
PROJECT SUMMARY
  • Examined current student enrollment data
  • Investigated possible funding sources for
    recruitment activities
  • Assisted in securing temp. recruiter position
  • Suggested new promotional materials, i.e., CD,
    video, brochures, etc.
  • Attended recruitment functions

20
Michael W. DuPonte
  • University of Hawaii
  • Manoa

21
4-H   MORE THAN YOU EVER IMAGINED
A REORGANIZATION, RESTRUCTURING, AND OVERVIEW OF
THE CURRENT HAWAII 4-H LIVESTOCK PROGRAM
Prepared by Michael W. DuPonte Livestock
Agent Cooperative Extension Service College of
Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources Universit
y of Hawaii at Manoa
22
4-H More Than You Ever Imagined
1. Stakeholders Survey 2. Strengths and Weakness
Assessment 3. Challenges and the Strategic
Plan 4. Reporting Results with Accountability 5.
Reorganization and Restructuring of Leadership
Roles
23
4-H More Than You Ever Imagined
6. Updating Bylaws, Rules, and Constitution 7.
Revising Marketing and Recruitment Program 8.
Publication with Technical Support from the Web
Site to Workbooks 9. Thinking Out of the Box
New Ideas of Using 4-H in an Everyday Environment
24
Jesse Thompson, Jr.
  • University of Illinois

25
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26
(No Transcript)
27
John Harrington
  • New Mexico State University

28
Working with the Provost and Vice-Provost on
Developing an Faculty Alternative Salary Plan
While not everyone may concur with an outcome,
it is essential to give everyone a chance to
provide their input before decisions are made.
29
Work with College Committee on Reviewing
In-house Agricultural Experiment Station
Publications
Sometimes you find yourself facing the same
challenge other Universities are or have faced
so it pays to ask for input instead of going it
alone.
30
Irwin L. Goldman
  • University of Wisconsin

31
Coordinated Plant Science Recruiting
ESCOP / ACOP Project, Academic Year
2001-2002 I.L. Goldman University of
Wisconsin-Madison
32
Need
  • Graduate education is a primary emphasis in
    research programs on campus
  • Attracting outstanding students is of primary
    concern to faculty and administration
  • With few exceptions, graduate programs and
    departments do not generally coordinate their
    recruiting efforts
  • It is difficult for potential students to
    navigate through the maze of opportunities, even
    within a field

33
Confusion
  • For example, graduate education in plant biology
    could be accomplished in more than 6 departments
    in two colleges
  • Due to tradition, students must often commit to
    graduate programs / advisors without the
    opportunity to rotate

34
Resolution
  • Coordinating recruitment efforts in plant biology
    across the campus could increase our ability to
    attract outstanding students by
  • Simplifying current complexity
  • Providing a plant biology roadmap to potential
    students
  • Focusing or expanding their applications
  • Improving campus visits and recruitment efforts
  • Allowing the opportunity for rotations

35
Pitfalls
  • Programs and Departments may feel coordinated
    recruiting will increase competition for good
    students
  • Coordinated recruiting will require more effort
  • Things dont work well when there is no one
    person to take charge of the entire effort
  • Coordinated recruiting will require money for
    recruitment visits, advertisement, and rotations
  • Rotations are not traditional in many applied
    departments, and their implementation may be
    challenging

36
Initial Approach
  • Identify and list plant biology faculty, labs,
    and programs
  • Identify coordinated recruiting efforts at other
    peer institutions and attempt to ascertain
    whether they have been successful
  • Meet individually with Department / Program
    Chairs, Faculty to determine whether coordinated
    recruiting is desirable
  • Meet with and secure funding from Administrators
    in the Graduate School for establishment of
    program
  • Form steering committee for coordinated program
  • Develop web presence for incoming class of fall,
    2003

37
C. Michael Deom
  • University of Georgia

38
Brazil-US Consortium In Agroecology
Universidade Federal do Pará
Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco
University of Georgia
www.uga.edu/int-ag/Brazil-US.html
39
Brazil-US Consortium in Agroecology
  • Department of Education-funded grant
  • Provides funds for travel and living expenses to
    support programs with our Brazilian partners
  • Student exchange
  • Semester or academic year
  • Portuguese language requirement
  • Agroecology curriculum
  • Internships
  • Credit toward Certificate in International Ag
  • Maymester Study Abroad
  • Tropical agroecosystem diversity
  • Differences between tropical and temperate
    ecosystems
  • No formal language requirement

40
Susan Cuppett
  • University of Nebraska

41
Project Overview
  • Project focused on improving the transfer process
    for international students
  • Working with two programs in Malaysia
  • Background
  • Food Science has always had Malaysian transfer
    students
  • Not always able to use all their transfer credits

42
Project Overview
  • Actions Taken
  • Identified two additional programs (Horticulture
    and Agribusiness) to which students could
    transfer
  • Developed Recommended Programs of Study that will
    maximize transfer credits

43
Shirley Hymon-Parker
  • University of Maryland
  • Eastern Shore

44
Shirley Hymon-ParkerDepartment of Human
EcologyUniversity of Maryland Eastern Shore
Enhancing Curricula in the School of Agricultural
and Natural Sciences
  • Internship Objectives
  • To develop an interdisciplinary Ph.D. program
    in Food Science and Technology between the
    Departments of Agriculture and Human Ecology at
    UMES
  • To establish a Collaborative Agreement with
    Agricultural Research Service of USDA to enhance
    and expand research opportunities in food science
    at UMES

45
  • OBJECTIVES
  • Objective 1 To developed an interdisciplinary
    Ph.D. program in Food Science and Technology
    between the Departments of
    Agriculture and Human Ecology at UMES
  • Wrote proposal to Maryland Higher Education
    Commission (MHEC) for approval to develop a Ph.D.
    degree in Food Science and Technology. This
    degree would address the educational needs of
    businesses, industry, and farmers on the Eastern
    Shore of Maryland and the region (Proposal was
    approved)
  • Wrote Title III (Department of Education)
    proposal to fund establishment of the new Food
    Science and Technology degree program (Proposal
    funded for five years)
  • Currently advertising three faculty positions
    for the program to be filled by July 2002
  • Objective 2 To established a Collaborative
    Agreement with Agricultural Research Services
    to enhance and expand research
    opportunities in food science at UMES
  • Worked with Wyndmoor, PA ARS administrators (Dr.
    John Cherry and Wilda Martinez) to identify
    research niche / void that would benefit both
    organizations if operationalized
  • Developed a Specific Cooperative Agreement (SCA)
  • Identified appropriate mechanisms (protocol) and
    legislative leaders to assist with securing
    funding for current and future research
    initiatives
  • BENEFITS
  • Individual This internship enabled me to grow
    professionally and enhance my knowledge of
    agricultural sciences in general while fulfilling
    the objectives of my internship. I also became
    familiar with the School of Agricultural and
    Natural Sciences industry constituents,
    legislative liaisons, and established a network
    of resources that can be utilized when addressing
    programmatic needs in the future. I am a
    stronger and more knowledgeable leader because of
    this ESCOP/ACOP Leadership experience.
  • Institutional The University now has an
    individual within its ranks that is more attuned
    and knowledgeable of the operation and needs of
    the School of Agricultural and Natural Sciences,
    and who is prepared for additional leadership
    responsibility within the Unit/University should
    the need arise.

46
John Beasley
  • University of Georgia

47
ESCOP/ACOP Phase II Project John Beasley,
University of Georgia
  • Project 1
  • Southeast Agriclimatology and Meteorological
    Center
  • Identify scientists with expertise/interest in
    working with center
  • University of Georgia scientists in Crop and
    Soil Sciences and Biological and Agricultural
    Engineering Departments
  • Identify other institutions or agencies with
    interest
  • Determine objectives of center
  • Identify funding sources
  • Determine conflicts of interest
  • Determine base of operations, primary contact
  • Progress
  • Identified 5 scientists, (4 UGA, 1 USDA) for
    initiation of project
  • Obtained 40,000 grant for initiation of center
    development
  • Recruited visiting scientist with expertise in
    atmospheric sciences and crop sciences to help
    set up tests and collect data

48
ESCOP/ACOP Phase II Project John Beasley,
University of Georgia
  • Project 2
  • University of Georgia Tifton Campus Research
    Education Conference
  • Objective conduct a 1 ½ day conference for
    faculty, staff, and USDA cooperators that are
    based at the University of Georgias Tifton
    Campus for the purpose of presenting and
    discussing research and education programs that
    focus on interdisciplinary teams.
  • Procedures in Development of Program
  • Form organizational committee set time-frame for
    conference identify
  • funding sources for breaks, breakfast, and
    awards set theme for
  • conference (Accomplishing Success through Team
    Tifton) develop
  • tentative schedule for presentations and develop
    criteria for poster
  • presentations
  • Other Phase II activities
  • Spent week shadowing Dean of UGA CAES
  • Attended numerous CAES administrative meetings
    with Asst. Deans, Assoc. Deans, Dean, and
    Department Heads

49
Ross Miller
  • University of Guam

50
  • Phase II ESCOP/ACOP Leadership Development
  • Ross Miller University of Guam (UOG)
  • Objective Evaluate College of Agriculture and
    Life Sciences (CALS)
  • Implementation and Integration of Land Grant
    Mission
  • Current situation
  • CALS and UOGs mission statement consistent with
    1862 land-grant universities
  • - emphasizing research, extension, instruction
  • CALS faculty on 12 month federally funded
    appointments other UOG faculty on
  • 9 month locally-funded appointments
  • Currently CALS research, extension, family
    science, community development
  • and 4-H faculty housed in 5 different
    administrative units with funding from
  • various federal sources, each with unit
    administrative head
  • All CALS faculty appointments are 100 research
    or 100 extension based with a local match to
    federal funds no funds provided for instruction

51
  • Recommendations for Enhancing Land-Grant Mission
    at UOG
  • Merger of CALS (in progress) into two academic
    departments (Consumer Family Sciences and
    Agricultural and Environmental Sciences) with
  • 2 department heads (to be selected)
  • Revamp academic curriculum to reduce number of
    courses taught by CALS
  • faculty (in progress) Rely on other colleges
    for supporting courses to avoid duplication of
    effort
  • Work for inclusion of resident instruction funds
    for territories in Farm Bill
  • Work with Guam legislature to provide adequate
    local funds for resident instruction publicize
    CALS achievements and grant awards
  • Create Office of Grants Research to encourage
    grant submissions by UOG
  • faculty and coordinate CALS submissions with
    non-CALS faculty
  • Other
  • Protect CALS researchers and extension personnel
    from unreasonable university-related incursions
    into available time

52
Ted Cable
  • Kansas State University

53
Ted Cable meeting with Costa Rican university
administrators
54
Although nobody has been slothful, things have
moved slowly with this project in Costa Rica
55
Douglas L. Vincent
  • University of Hawaii
  • Manoa

56
ESCOP/ACOP Leadership Development Class
11Douglas L. Vincent, University of Hawaii at
ManoaDepartment of Human Nutrition, Food and
Animal Sciences
  • Reorganization of College of Tropical Agriculture
    and Human Resources (from 11 to 6 Departments)
  • FSHN and ANSC Departments merged in 2000
  • Extension Educators brought into academic
    departments

57
ESCOP/ACOP Leadership Development Class
11Douglas L. Vincent Leadership Activities
  • Lead a two-day strategic planning retreat in
    September, 2001
  • Developed Vision and Common Goals for HNFAS
  • Discovered new strengths about each other
  • Developed and implemented new HNFAS
    infrastructure committees to merge two academic
    programs and integrate extension educators into
    HNFAS
  • Rewrote Promotion and Tenure and Post-Tenure
    Review Guidelines

58
Carl J. Jones
  • University of Tennessee

59
Carl J. JonesUniversity of Tennessee
  • The University of Tennessee Institute of
    Agriculture is undergoing dynamic changes as it
    adapts growth in modern agricultural technology
    to the needs of both large modern farms and
    small, often low income, operations. The problem
    which I seek to fix, is that of clearly
    communicating needs from the grower to Experiment
    Station Scientists through appropriate channels.

60
Beginning to Find Solutions
  • A one-day retreat bringing together Department
    Heads, Extension Program Leaders, and other
    administrators, was accomplished in late fall,
    2001. As a result of this FIRST meeting,
    communications have opened up and each group is
    striving to understand and meet the needs of the
    other. Both groups have implemented changes, with
    more under study.

61
Catherine A. Solheim
  • University of Minnesota

62
Discovery, Engagement, TeachingBalance of
Scholarship
  • Define outreach/engagement scholarship
  • Identify ways to measure, document, and evaluate
  • Create college-wide system for reporting and
    communicating
  • Revise workload principles to reflect balance of
    scholarship philosophy

63
Extension Realignment
  • Develop new position descriptions for regional
    educators
  • Reassign and orient educators for regional scope
    of work
  • Define Extension family development competencies
    and engagement scholarship
  • Create system for departmental affiliations

64
Dennis Fulbright
  • Michigan State University

65
Phase II Dennis W. Fulbright, Michigan State
University
The Goal
Develop a School for Environmental Study and
Policy at Michigan State University
The Mission
Provost calls on Michigan Agricultural Experiment
Station (MAES) to develop an organization where
MSU environmental studies can be showcased and
where research will flourish.
MAES chosen because its research programs are
broad and cut across college lines, MAES is
respected by researchers, MAES plays neutral role
on campus in terms of funding, MAES directors are
knowledgeable about current environmental
programs on campus.
The Philosophy
Be inclusive of all scholars on campus, provide
opportunities for input, allow scholars to build
and buy into the structure
66
The Process
October, December and January task force meetings
with recognized MSU scholars in areas of
environmental studies, engineering,
communication, economics and community
development. These scholars represent several
departments, existing environmental institutes,
and at least five colleges.
Task force selected an organizational structure
representing a college with a non-academic dean.
The dean would report to the Provost, but all
courses and degrees would be granted through
existing colleges and departments. Graduate
courses would track through departments.
It is all my fault Robert E. Lee after
Picketts charge and Dennis W. Fulbright after
meeting with Provost
The Outcome
Draft of guiding principles and structure sent to
provost and meeting held with MAES
representatives. Structure is too inclusive
need outside scholars to determine the specific
programmatic thrusts that should be emphasized.
Excellence needs to be recognized.We are still
working on this project.
Thanks to all at MAES for a wonderful experience
and especially Dr. Jan Bokemeier, my mentor.
67
Alan Gray
  • University of Wyoming

68
Visioning The Future With Northwest Wyoming
Shareholders
  • Objective Dean, College of Agriculture Is
    Seeking Shareholder Input For College Of
    Agriculture Strategic Plan
  • Purpose Shareholders To Help Define College of
    Agriculture Academic, Research Extension
    Programs For Year 2010

69
Activity Conduct Visioning Sessions With College
Dean In Big Horn/Wind River Basins
  • Determine Views On
  • Systems Agriculture
  • Natural Resources
  • Environment
  • Rural Communities
  • Sustainability
  • Considerations
  • Water Rights/Quality
  • Profitability
  • Resource Mgmt
  • Niche Markets
  • Rural Urbanization
  • Managing Change
  • Globalization

70
Anita Nina Azarenko
  • Oregon State University

71
Tree Fruit Strategic Summit
  • Co-organized strategic summit on the future of
    the tree fruit industry in the Mid-Columbia
    region of Oregon
  • Created a white paper describing the outcomes of
    the summit
  • Presented summaries at appropriate public forums

72
Shared leadership/management models
  • Evaluated different models of shared
    leadership/management in medium to large sized
    units of the College of Agricultural Sciences at
    OSU and other land grant institutions
  • Considered diversity of missions, geographic
    distribution of faculty, budgetary, and other
    factors
  • Led discussion on possible shared
    leadership/management models for in the
    Horticulture Dept.

73
Lloyd T. Walker
  • Alabama AM University

74
Revitalization of Departmental ProgramsbyLloyd
T. Walker
  • Improved Visibility Marketing of Programs
  • New Website, Brochures, Newsletter, Banners
    Posters
  • Strengthening Critical Faculty Mass
  • Faculty Positions Filled Small Ruminant
    Nutrition, Food Microbiology, Nutritional
    Biochemistry, Post-Harvest Technology/Product
    Development, Animal Breeding/Genetics (pending)
  • Increased Student Enrollment
  • Increased Recruitment Activities
  • Facelift for Departmental Public Areas
  • Wall Directory, New Cabinet Display Poster
    Display Boards

75
  • Increased Educational Outreach
  • Visits to Area Middle High Schools
  • Science Demonstration Projects Speakers Bureau
  • Increased External Collaborations/Partnerships
  • University UGA, Purdue, Nebraska, Texas Tech
  • Private Industries McKee Foods, General Mills,
    Waynes Farm, Dutch Quality House
  • Others Burritt's Museum
  • Addition of New Research Equipment
  • New HPLC, Spiral Plater, Colorimeter,
    Spectrophometer Centrifuge
  • Shared Governance in Leadership
  • More Input from Faculty, Staff Students in
    Decision Making
  • More Social Events

76
Tavita Elisara
  • American Samoa
  • Community College

77
ESCOP/ACOP LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT TRAINING -
RESULTS ACCOMPLISHMENTS
  • Served as Acting Director for to oversee Land
    Grant for two weeks
  • Represented Land Grant Director at meetings with
    President Deans
  • Represented ASCC President Land Grant Director
    at Arbor Week Opening
  • Assigned by ASCC President to Samoan Language
    Culture Task Force Committee
  • Assigned by Mentor to ASCC Accreditation
    Self-Study committee
  • Attended 4 Instructional Staff Meeting to Discuss
    Course Changes
  • Served 3 times as Acting Extension Program
    Coordinator
  • Appointed to Show Sell Fair Organizing
    Committee
  • Served Twice as Mediator to Resolve Personnel
    Conflicting issues
  • Assigned to Meetings, with representatives of
    Western Association of Accredited Schools to
    discuss ASCC Self-Study
  • Attended Meetings of Deans with National
    University of Samoa to discuss Articulation
    future Collaboration

78
SOCIAL, ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT
  • Improved and Strengthened Communications with
    Students, Staff and Faculty (memos, meetings,
    phone e-mail messages etc.,)
  • Improved Participation of Students, Staff
    Faculty in Extracurricular Activities (Show
    Sell Fair, Career Days, Arbor Celebration, etc.,)
  • As a result of improved collaboration among
    students, staff and faculty, the Board of Higher
    Education challenged ASCC to host a much bigger
    Food Farm Fair in 2002
  • Increased Understanding of the Land Grant Program
    and ASCC as a Land Grant Institution by Students,
    Staff Faculty
  • Increased collaboration with farming community as
    shown by farmer participation in workshops and
    special events
  • Improved communication with off-island colleagues
    (e.g. publications, announcements, etc.,
  • Improved collaboration within ASCC Land Grant and
    Government Agencies and US counterparts (USEPA,
    UHCTA-CES, etc.,)

79
Mark Alley
  • Virginia Tech University

80
FACULTY PRODUCTIVITYM. M. AlleyVirginia Tech
  • Productivity defined
  • Output per unit of effort or,
  • Effectiveness in utilizing resources (labor and
    facilities) for production.
  • Project Justification
  • Resources (faculty positions, labs, etc) must be
    justified on the basis of being productive.
  • Project objectives
  • Review measurement of faculty productivity
  • Discuss factors known to influence (positive and
    negative) faculty productivity.

81
Project Approach
  • Review and summarize literature
  • measurement of faculty productivity
  • factors influencing faculty productivity
  • Discussion and conclusions
  • Management approaches that could enhance faculty
    productivity
  • Management approaches that have the potential to
    reduce faculty productivity

82
Ronald Pearson
  • Virginia Tech University

83
Increasing the Efficiency of Graduate Teaching in
Disciplines with Small Class Size
  • Dr. Ron Pearson
  • Dairy Science Department
  • Virginia Tech
  • Blacksburg, VA 24061-0315

84
APPROACH
  • Find ways to offer and make attractive graduate
    courses to students from other Universities
  • Common Market Agreements for graduate Courses
  • Distance Ed Enterprise Program
  • Virtual Campus
  • Intensive summer Institutes (Continuing Ed)
  • Will any of these work???

85
Mary E. Collins
  • University of Florida

86
Under-enrolled Undergraduate Majors in The
Colleges of Agriculture Mary E. Collins Mentored
by Jimmy Cheek, Dean Jane Luzar, Associate
Dean College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
  • How do we administrately define under-enrolled
  • majors?
  • What are the majors that have a low number of
  • undergraduates? Why are they low?
  • What has been the history (past 10 years) of
  • enrollment in those majors?
  • What will the future be for the under-enrolled
    majors?

IFAS
CALS - IFAS
87
Under-enrolled Undergraduate Majors in Colleges
of Agriculture Mary E. Collins
  • Under-enrolled majors were defined as low
    enrollment, or lower than expected enrollment in
    a specific major.
  • Thirty Land Grant Universities were identified
    for study. The LGU chosen represent AAU and a
    geographic range. The under-enrolled majors were
    identified by the home institution.
  • In order to increase the numbers, some marketing
    strategies of these under-enrolled majors has
    included key curricula changes, more practical
    and lower-level courses being created, and
    proactive recruitment.

CALS - IFAS
88
Thomas Patterson, Jr.
  • University of Vermont

89
PHASE II PROJECT Thomas F. Patterson, Jr.
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,
University of Vermont
  • My phase II project consisted of shadowing my
    mentor,
  • the Dean of the College of Agriculture and Life
    Sciences,
  • Rachel Johnson.
  • I attended many meetings, both as a participant
    and as an observer,
  • where I focused on her leadership style,. I also
    had several one-on-
  • one meetings with her to discuss the Phase II
    Core Curriculum
  • Objectives, her experiences as Dean, and her
    ideas on leadership.
  • In addition, I familiarized myself with the
    literature on leadership,
  • especially, the differences between women and men
    in leadership
  • roles.

90
Ways Women Lead Interactive, Transformational
Leadership
  • Encourage Participation
  • Share Power and Information
  • Enhance the Self-Worth of Others
  • Energize Others
  • Rosener, Judy, B., Ways Women Lead, Harvard
    Business Review, 68119-125, 1990.

91
Steven A. Sargent
  • University of Florida

92
The Challenge
Respond to a growing organic-agriculture
community in Florida
  • NEEDS
  • Science-based research on
  • organic principles practices for humid
  • sub-tropics
  • Extend information to county
  • agents and growers
  • Incorporate into existing and new courses

Steve Sargent University of Florida Proud Member
of Blue Group
93
The Response
  • Survey statewide faculty for research, teaching,
    extension interests
  • Collate responses into a resource database
  • Participate in the planning formation of a
    Center for Organic Agriculture
  • Build consensus between growers university
    community

94
Mark Rieger
  • University of Georgia

95
Curriculum Development Off-campus major in
Agricultural Science and Emerging TechnologyMark
Rieger University of Georgia
  • New major cross-disciplinary,
  • cutting edge, hands-on emphasis
  • Located on UGAs Tifton Campus in
  • the heart of Georgia agriculture
  • Partnership with 2-year college
  • First off-campus teaching program
  • for College of Agric Environ Sci

Tifton Campus

ASET
96
Curriculum Development Off-campus major in
Agricultural Science and Emerging TechnologyMark
Rieger- University of Georgia
  • Mentor David Knauft Assoc. Dean for Instruction
  • Objectives Extend teaching off-campus tap
    Tifton faculty expertise UGA presence in south
    Georgia increase undergrad enrollment
  • Tasks Curriculum development, chair committee,
    write new major proposal usher through approval
    process, resource requirements
  • Status Curriculum developed, new major proposal
    approved, some new courses approved, on-track for
    Fall, 2003

97
Evie Engle Liss
  • Oregon State University

98
Evaluating and Designing a Publishing System for
the Agricultural Experiment Station at Oregon
State UniversityEvie Engel LissPublishing
Specialist and ProfessorDepartment of Extension
and Experiment Station Communications
  • Investigate perceptions of current AES
    publishing system -- Conversations with
    on-campus department heads -- Discussions with
    off-campus branch station superintendents --
    On-site visits with off-campus faculty and staff
  • Survey on- and off-campus faculty with AES
    responsibilities -- Have they published with
    existing system -- Do they use the journal
    reprint payment option -- Review proposed
    publishing system -- Identify expectations for
    editorial/production support
  • Examine AES publishing at other Land Grant
    universities -- Web search for online
    documents -- E-mail survey of ESCOP/ACOP interns

99
Evaluating and Designing a Publishing System for
the Agricultural Experiment Station at Oregon
State University (continued)Evie Engel Liss
  • Synthesize information -- Discuss faculty
    perceptions with AES Administration -- Evaluate
    communications strategies, options -- Develop
    proposal for new publishing system (and/or) --
    Recommend discontinuing publishing system
  • Propose streamlined publishing system --
    Reduce number of series in which to publish --
    Introduce formal peer-review process --
    Emphasize electronic delivery mechanisms --
    Upgrade quality of published documents
  • Implement system, evaluate, and refine as
    needed
  • Identify alternatives if publishing
    discontinued

100
Joan Fulton
  • Purdue University

101
Phase II Joan Fulton
  • Discussed roles of roles of different
    organizational units and different philosophies
    of leadership with
  • Dept. Head/Ag Communications
  • Director of Purdue Ag Centers
  • Dean and Assoc Deans in Agriculture
  • Vice President Research, Purdue University
  • Provost, Purdue University

102
Phase II -- Joan Fulton
  • Built on experiences from Fultons 2 years
    chairing the colleges Curriculum Committee
  • Worked Closely with mentor Dr. Karl Brandt
    (Assoc. Dean for Academic Programs) to assist
    departments in implementing recent changes to
    core curriculum (e.g. Capstone Course)
  • In-service for faculty on developing Capstone
    Courses
  • Seminar in November 2001
  • Workshop is being developed for Spring 2002

103
Steve Nameth
  • Ohio State University

104
THE PAUL ECKE, Jr.EXCELLENCE in FLORICULTURE
ENDOWMENTin theCollege of Food, Agricultural,
and Environmental Sciences atThe Ohio State
University
  • By
  • Stephen G.P. Nameth, Ph.D.

105
1.5 Million Endowment Objectives
  • Strengthen and improve OSU Floriculture Program.
  • Discover, synthesize and communicate knowledge
    about floriculture plants and their uses for the
    benefit of the people of Ohio, the nation, and
    the world.
  • Help advance research in floriculture at The Ohio
    State University and partnering universities.
  • Help support distinguished, nationally
    recognized visitors from the floriculture
    industry.
  • Help support students interested in a career in
    floriculture.
  • Help fund special programs in floriculture at
    OSU.

106
Kristina Boone
  • Kansas State University

107
Image of the College of Agriculture Kristina M.
Boone Mentor Marc Johnson, Dean
  • What Happened
  • Committee formed in August
  • Subcommittees formed and work
  • a. defining accurate image
  • b. identifying perceptions among
  • high school students
  • students on campus
  • faculty and administrators
  • other influencers (parents, alumni, etc.)

108
  • Steps to be completed by June
  • Presentations at dept. and other meetings
  • Committee retreat for recommendations
  • Draft of report presented for comment
  • Final report submitted to dean
  • End Results Expected
  • Significant changes to college name (the College
    of What?), recruitment, etc.
  • Group to determine future directions of college
  • Publications on process
  • and results
  • Thank you, Marc, for your help!

109
Karen Mancl
  • Ohio State University

110
Mentoring for Faculty Success
  • Karen Mancl
  • Professor Food, Agric. Biological Engineering
  • The Ohio State University

111
Faculty Professional Development
  • Mentoring is becoming the preferred faculty
    development tool
  • Senior faculty know little about how to mentor
    effectively
  • Poor mentoring can result in
  • Lack of tenure success
  • Low productivity of mid-career faculty

112
Mentoring Research
  • Developed a new faculty mentoring model
  • Research needed
  • Women mentoring men
  • Americans mentoring Asians

113
Paul Brown
  • Iowa State University

114
John Deere Institute
  • Content Agriculture awareness
  • Audience 5,000 Waterloo employees
  • Features
  • ISU Extension instructors (20)
  • 25 students per class
  • Results from Rural Life Poll
  • Videos - PowerPoint - Interactivity


115
John Deere Institute
  • Three levels
  • 101 now being taught
  • 201 and 301 to be developed
  • Possible leverage to employees in other John
    Deere plants
  • 91 of participants said JD 101 was beneficial

116
Michael Moody
  • Louisiana State University

117
Maximizing University/Food Processing Industry
Support
  • Convene a food processing industry forum
  • (Nov 01)
  • Implement an industry based nominal group
    process
  • (1) identify challenges for the university
  • (2) identify challenges for the industry
  • (3) identify solutions for addressing with those
    challenges
  • Establish an industry food processing steering
    committee (quarterly meetings)

118
Challenges identify by nominal group process (top
four listed by priority)
  • Industry
  • Food safety education
  • Regulatory compliance
  • Research and development
  • Marketing products
  • University
  • Communication to industry
  • Industry driven research programs
  • Continuing education for industry
  • Increased funding

119
Brad Joern
  • Purdue University

120
Project Objectives
  • Develop software that crop and livestock
    producers in multiple states can use to write
    comprehensive nutrient management plans.
  • Make software flexible enough to meet Natural
    Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) and state
    regulatory agency requirements while following
    Land Grant University recommendations.
  • Approach
  • Conducted face to face meetings with Extension,
    NRCS, and regulatory agency personnel to
    determine state-specific nutrient management
    requirements.
  • Developed state-specific nutrient management
    software based on a common program platform.

121
Project Outcomes
  • Manure Management Planner (MMP) software was
    developed with funding from Purdue University,
    the Indiana Department of Environmental
    Management, and USDA-NRCS.
  • MMP is now the USDA-NRCS endorsed and supported
    tool for writing and implementing nutrient
    management plans.
  • MMP currently supports 14 states (IA, IL, IN, KS,
    MI, MN, MO, NE, ND, OH, OK, PA, SD and WI), with
    an additional 10-12 states to be added in 2002.
  • MMP can be downloaded for free from the following
    Website
  • www.agry.purdue.edu/mmp

122
Daniel Edge
  • Oregon State University

123
Advisory Boards and CouncilsA Survey of OSU Units
  • Most common purposes are strategic planning,
    budget support and outreach to policy makers
  • Most effective at budget support and staffing
    priorities
  • Least effective at development and outreach
  • Special efforts by director or a few individuals
    is most common reason boards are effective

124
Advisory Board Success Stories
  • Guided development of new curriculum
  • New positions created through legislative
    enhancement packages
  • New building
  • Creation of Extension Service Districts

125
Reginal Harrell
  • University of Maryland

126
  • Reginal M. Harrell
  • University of Maryland, MCE, AES
  • Phase II Projects
  • Co-Chair Revision of MCE Strategic Plan
    Committee
  • Co-Chair New MCE Plan of Work Committee
  • Develop Concept Paper on Improving AES-MCE
    Cooperation for Field Faculty
  • Shadow Dean College of Agriculture and Natural
    Resources

127
  • Challenges and Opportunities
  • Consensus building challenges leadership skills
  • Diplomacy, tact, patience, vision, listening
  • Quality always takes longer than expected
  • Work Group size should be manageable but
    representative
  • Partnerships require
  • Homework, clarity of purpose, honesty, buy-in
  • Keeping up with Dean is like hitting a moving
    target
  • Management by wandering
  • Leadership and Management are not the same thing

128
Max Pfeffer
  • Cornell University

129
Leadership in Successful Interdisciplinary
Research TeamsMax J. PfefferCornell
UniversityWhat to encourage
  • Development of relationships that build bridges
    across academic structures though friendship and
    collegiality
  • Assertive leaders who have the interpersonal
    skills, stature, and respect to motivate others
  • Intellectual leaders who anchor the group and
    help build team interest in a common objective

130
What to encourage
  • Investment in leaders so they have time to spend
    on interdisciplinary research projects
  • Creation of a common pool of resources to
    encourage team interaction
  • Involvement in cutting-edge, intellectually
    stimulating opportunities

131
Richard Harper
  • Clemson University

132
Richard A. Harper, Clemson University
Mentor, job-shadow, and collaborate with a
variety of forestry community leaders to
  • identify problems and issues (first hand) facing
    the forestry community
  • determine how extension/outreach can more
    effectively align with constituents problem
    solving and continuing education needs

133
Richard A. Harper, Clemson University
Mentor, job-shadow, and collaborate with a
variety of forestry community leaders to
  • produce a gap analysis of academia's scholarship
    and develop a path for closing the gap through a
    strategy of collaborative partnerships, virtual
    teams, and continual improvement
  • compare administrative styles and efficiencies,
    summarize information, and share with the
    university leadership

134
Richard A. Harper, Clemson University
Collaborators Forest Landowner Select Industry
Leaders Timber Harvesting Professional Consultant
(forestry and technical forestry) SC Department
of Health and Environmental Control SC Department
of Natural Resources SC Senator/Representative SC
Forestry Commission SC Dept. of Commerce
135
Michael Morrissey
  • Oregon State University

136
Tree Fruit Strategic Summit
  • Co-organized strategic summit on the future of
    the tree fruit industry in the Mid-Columbia
    region of Oregon
  • Created a white paper describing the outcomes of
    the summit
  • Presented summaries at appropriate public forums

137
Shared leadership/management models
  • Evaluated different models of shared
    leadership/management in medium to large sized
    units of the College of Agricultural Sciences at
    OSU and other land grant institutions
  • Considered diversity of missions, geographic
    distribution of faculty, budgetary, and other
    factors
  • Led discussion on possible shared
    leadership/management models for in the
    Horticulture Dept.

138
Mark Risse
  • University of Georgia

139
Mark Risse Environmental Training for County
Extension Staff
  • Goal Land Grant University faculty are
    recognized as the source of information on
    agricultural issues. We would like them to be
    recognized as the source for environmental
    information as well.
  • Question How must we prepare and equip county
    staff to enable them in this task?

140
  • Process
  • Review land grant mission
  • Interview University, community, environmental
    leaders
  • Review other State and National Programs
  • Develop recommendation for 5 year training plan
    for county based staff

Outcome To be determined
141
Roger Leonard
  • Louisiana State University

142
Northeast Research/Extension Center Model
LSU AgCenter Main Campus
Programmatic
FCS/4-H
Administration
Center Director
Parish Offices (Chair)
Staff
Staff
Agents
Research Stations (Coordinator)
Extension/Education Programs
Extension Specialists
Faculty
Staff
Staff
143
Issues Limiting Implementation of LSU Model for a
Research/Extension Center
³
³
144
Xiusheng (Harrison) Yang
  • University of Connecticut

145
Phase II Activities What I didHarrison Yang
  • Shadowing the Dean (mentor) for two semesters
  • Attending meetings of the College Executive
    Council
  • Participating in meetings on college budget
    preparation and allocation
  • Participating in regional meetings representing
    the College
  • Developing Guidelines for Research Activities at
    Storrs Agricultural Experiment Station
  • Meeting weekly with the Dean on leadership issues
  • Reading literature on academic leadership

146
Phase II Activities What I learnedHarrison
Yang
  • Land-grant university administrative and
    supporting structures
  • Roles of academic deans and department heads
  • Relationships with federal and state governments
  • Pros and cons of being an academic administrator
  • My strengths and weaknesses relating to serving
    as an administrator

147
Jinglu Tan
  • University of Missouri

148
Leading a Multidisciplinary Unit-Jinglu Tan,
University of Missouri
  • Departments and Programs in Unit
  • Biological Engineering
  • Ag Systems Management
  • Food Science
  • Hotel and Restaurant Management
  • Ag Engineering Extension
  • Challenges
  • Lack of academic uniformity
  • Limited resources

149
Leading a Multidisciplinary Unit-Jinglu Tan,
University of Missouri
  • Approaches
  • Priority setting for each program
  • Team building
  • Leadership team
  • Coordinated teaching
  • Research teams
  • Staff teams and involvement
  • Resource sharing
  • Expected Results
  • Focused, efficient and competitive programs

150
Ann Kier
  • Texas AM University

151
Phase II Project Ann B. Kier
  • Accomplished
  • Five-year Unit Plan for Pathobiology, Texas
    Agricultural Experiment Station (agricultural and
    biomedical research)
  • Ph.D. external reviews for Microbiology and
    Pathology graduate programs
  • AVMA five year review
  • Vision 2020, Texas AM University five year plan
    for Pathobiology teaching, service, and research

152
Phase II Project Ann B. Kier
  • Shadowing attending weekly TAES Associates
    meetings, Dr. Charles Scifres, Associate Vice
    Chancellor, Deputy Director, Texas Agricultural
    Experiment Station
  • Shadowing attending Executive Committee meetings
    of the College of Education, meeting with Dean
    Jane Conoley

153
Michael Mazzocco
  • University of Illinois

154
A Balanced Scorecard Approach to Strategy
Development Implementation Application at the
College and Extension Program Levels Michael A.
Mazzocco University of Illinois
  • Targets
  • College of ACES, Academic Programs International
    Objectives
  • College of ACES, Academic Programs Leadership
    Objectives
  • University of Illinois Extension, Program
    Planning Process

155
  • College of ACES, Academic Programs
    International Objectives
  • Goal Engage faculty staff, and students
    in international
  • dimensions create related opportunities in
    Teaching,
  • Research and Outreach.
  • Current Establish Partnerships Coordinate
    International Study
  • Strategy Programs
  • Future Processes for relationship management
    with partners
  • Customer awareness mechanisms Make it look
    easy.
  • College of ACES, Academic Programs Leadership
    Objectives
  • Goal Create broad, diverse opportunities
    for ACES students
  • to develop personal and corporate leadership
    skills.
  • Current Propose Leadership Minor Provide
    faculty
  • Strategy development programs Provide
    incentive funding
  • Future Customer Measures of leadership
    training effectiveness
  • Learning Growth objectives for infusing
    leadership
  • University of Illinois Extension, Program
    Planning Process
  • Goal Establish 4-year Work Plan for
    Comm. Econ. Dev.
  • Strategy Learning Growth/Process development
    in Balanced

156
Michael ONeill
  • USDA-CSREES

157
Leading Change From the Middle
Before ESCOP/ACOP
After ESCOP/ACOP
Trust me Im a Leader!
Lets kick butt !!!
158
Strategic Planning Making things Happen
Within the NRE Unit

- Leadership - Scholarship - Partnership
- Representation - Administration - Service
  • NPL Job Functions
  • Strategic Imperatives
  • Individual Operational
  • Plans
  • Unit Management Plan


- Annual Report - Looking Over the Horizon
- Sharing Program Leadership - Increasing
Accountability - Communicating w/ Private
Sector - Improving Administrative Efficiency

- Map Functions and Imperatives (Job Matrix) -
Prioritize Functions / Imperatives
  • Sum Individual Operational Plans
  • Identify Gaps for the NRE Unit

159
Strategic Planning Making things Happen
With State Partners
  • Joint Priority Setting
  • Reporting/Accountability
  • Representation (by States)
  • Focus on Effectiveness,
  • Efficiency, and Relevancy
  • Adding Value to the
  • Program

  • Shared Program
  • Leadership

160
Ellen Danus
  • USDA-CSREES

161
ESCOP/ACOP Phase II Project
  • Ellen Danus
  • Policy Specialist
  • Office of Extramural Programs
  • CSREES-USDA

162
Mentor David R.
MacKenzie Executive Director Northeastern
Regional Association of State
Agricultural Experiment Station
DirectorsObserved Farm Bill Task Force, Board
of Agriculture, Meetings. Gained Insight into
the Issues and Concerns of the Land-Grant
Institutions for the Next Farm Bill.
163
Gregory Ziegler
  • Pennsylvania State University

164
Fostering Interdisciplinary Research
  • Working out of the Office of the Vice President
    for Research and Dean of the Graduate School
  • Assisted faculty explore the potential for an NSF
    Engineering Research Center in Chemical and
    Biological Sensing
  • Currently working to bring a team together to
    respond to the PA Dept. of Health RFA for
    Collaborative Research Projects

165
PA DOH Collaborative Research
  • Non-formula, competitive funds from Tobacco
    settlement
  • Bioinformatics as related to cancer or infectious
    disease
  • Tight timeline RFA 1/29, Due 3/13
  • Integrated Surveillance and Emergency Response
    Network
  • Multidisciplinary and multi-institutional, but
    who and how?

166
Mary Marchant
  • University of Kentucky

167
Phase II Project
  • Chair, Ag. College Diversity Task Force
  • Attended weekly Ag. college administrative
    meetings
  • Attended Administrative Heads Section
    meeting--Southern Assoc. of Ag. Scientists (SAAS)
    with Dean Scott Smith, Orlando, Fl., Feb.
    4, 2002

168
Phase II Project
  • Will attend Southern Assoc. of Ag. Experiment
    Station Directors meeting with Associate Dean
    Nancy Cox, Savannah, GA, March 24-27, 2002
  • Shadowed college administrators
  • Thank you to my ESCOP/ACOP mentor, Associate Dean
    Linus Walton and
  • Thank you to Dean Scott Smith, Associate Deans
    Nancy Cox, Joe Davis, Larry Turner, and to
    ESCOP/ACOP advisory committee instructors

169
Joel Caton
  • North Dakota State University

170
Multidisciplinary Graduate Training
  • Regional, federal, national, and international
    partners
  • Collaborative research projects and distance
    graduate instruction
  • Increased competitive grant writing
  • Enhanced doctoral programs through
    multi-institutional cross-training

171
Shadowing the Director
  • Examples in leadership and problem solving at the
    Experiment Station Director level
  • Participation in decision processes
  • Obtaining a broader view of the Experiment
    Station
  • In depth discussion regarding leadership/faculty
    interface

172
Andrew Paterson
  • University of Georgia

173
60
US genomics research investments have been only
loosely-related to economic opportunity. Transfor
mation of basic discovery research such as
genomics, into public benefit requires (a)
Public-sector science as a virtual RD resource,
linked to (b) a value capture mechanism
to foster the investments needed to translate
discoveries into economic growth.
24
22
Plants
20
Animals
Chicken
18
16
Annual US farm-gate value (billion)
14
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