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Bringing PBS Home Collaborating with Families

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Title: Bringing PBS Home Collaborating with Families


1
Bringing PBS HomeCollaborating with Families
  • Developed and compiled by Mack and Vitto, 2007

2
Acknowlegements
  • Muskegon Area ISD Behavioral Support Team
  • Muskegon Participating PBS Families
  • MiBLSi training materials
  • Publications by
  • Dr. Tim Lewis, Dr. Rob Horner, Dr. George Sugai
  • Sandra L. Christenson and Susan M. Sheridan
  • Thanks to our colleagues for letting us share
    their experiences and recommendations

3
Goals for todays session
  • Introduce a Systems model for developing
    effective parent understanding of and involvement
    with Positive Behavior Supports in schools
  • Considerations for dealing with difficult
    Home/School Partnerships

4

What We Know
  • When family members are involved in their
    childrens education, children and youth do
    better, stay in school longer, and achieve more
  • Many schools only engage a small percentage of
    the families of their students
  • There is a good deal of misunderstanding between
    teachers and families about each others roles
    and responsibilities

5

What We Know
Many families are involved in their childrens
educations in ways that school personnel dont
know about, support, or foster History/cultural
differences , race, and SES affect the quality
of the relationships between school personnel and
families Productive relationships result when
school personnel get involved with families and
their communities
6
Stereotypes about ...
TEACHERS
Parents
Parent as couch potato Parent as
troublemaker Parent as enabler Parent as
ostrich Parent as dropout Parent as
advocate Parent as partner
Teacher as deity Teacher as babysitter Teacher as
whiny bureaucrat Teacher as apathetic
bureaucrat Teacher as surrogate parent Teacher as
therapist Teacher as partner
7
Involvement has traditionally meant parents. .
.
  • Attend school for meetings/conferences, special
    assemblies or events
  • Volunteer in classrooms, help with field trips
  • Participate in fund raising events
  • Join school councils or other decision-making
    groups
  • Supervise homework and help students with school
    assignments, projects at home
  • Make sure students are ready for school and
    learning by making sure they are well fed,
    clothed, and get enough sleep

8
Why Involvement Hasnt Worked Very Well
  • It leaves out too many families
  • family history
  • unwelcoming environments
  • language cultural differences
  • time transportation
  • Its a narrow definition
  • school focused
  • child focused
  • It only goes one-way

9
Starting Point
  • Schools and their communities should define what
    involvement means across a continuum of
    behavioral supports
  • Schools should build a system that is accessible
    and open to family involvement
  • Schools cannot mandate family involvement
  • Schools must build a system of support that is
    not-contingent on family involvement
  • Families should also work toward understanding
    limitations of education system

10
A Working Definition of Family Involvement
  • Awareness
  • Involvement
  • Support

11
A Working Definition of Family Involvement Across
the Continuum
  • Awareness Universals, Small Group, Individual
  • Involvement Universals, Small Group, Individual
  • Support - Universals, Small Group, Individual

12
Tertiary Prevention Specialized
Individualized Systems for Students with
High-Risk Behavior
CONTINUUM OF SCHOOL-WIDE INSTRUCTIONAL
POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT
5
Secondary Prevention Specialized Group Systems
for Students with At-Risk Behavior
15
Primary Prevention School-/Classroom- Wide
Systems for All Students, Staff, Settings
80 of Students
13
Universals Connect Points To Families
  • Primary Focus Awareness
  • Information, Information, Information (2-way)
  • Educators and parents sharing information across
    multiple venues
  • Involvement
  • Parent team member
  • Specific activities to partner with families at
    school
  • Support
  • Information regarding range of services
    supports
  • Referral Points
  • Strategies for home use

14
Steps toward Awareness of School-wide PBS
initiative
  • Introductory Letter or Newsletter
  • Open House/Conference
  • Video or Slide Presentation
  • PBS for Parents Booklet
  • Involving Parents in Kick-off
  • Hero Nights
  • Wrap Around Programs

15
Awareness Components
  • Include in handout or presentation
  • What is Positive Behavior Supports
  • Why is it needed?
  • How is it different from traditional approaches
  • What does positive mean?
  • What are the schools expectations?
  • How are they trained?
  • How and why are kids rewarded?
  • How can parents support PBS?

16
INCLUDING FAMILIES IN PBS
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18
Positive Approaches for Challenging Behavior
Booklet
  • Include
  • Behavioral Expectations
  • Matrix
  • Tickets/Coupons
  • Certificates
  • Introduction to PBS process at your school
  • At the end of booklet put in your areas
    resources and contact information

19
Seven Steps for establishing PBS at home
  • Get all family members on board
  • Hold a family meeting to introduce the idea and
    discuss how the family can support PBS at home
  • Pick three areas where the most growth is needed
    and decide on expectations that are consistent
    with schools
  • Decide how to teach these expectations at home
  • Decide how to reinforce expected behaviors
  • Decide how to correct behavioral errors-whats
    your discipline plan
  • Hold family meetings as needed to make the
    expectations work for you and your family

20
Parent WAVE Pamphlet
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25
Small Group/Targeted Connect Points To Families
  • Awareness
  • Continuum of supports explained
  • Referral points defined
  • Primary Focus Involvement
  • Parent consent/ information meeting
  • Parent part of planning
  • Follow-up meetings and outcome sharing
  • Support
  • Partnership to explore school / home strategies
  • Quick easy generalization strategies for home
    use

26
Individual/Intensive Connect Points To Families
  • Awareness
  • Information (e.g., IDEA, ADA, Mental Health,
    District Services)
  • Accessible referral point (special education /
    non-special education)
  • Teacher education RE impact on family
  • Science of behavior for both educators and
    family
  • Involvement
  • Family advocacy groups on school/district team
  • Parents of children with disabilities on
    school/district team
  • Primary Focus Support
  • Partner planning strengths-based focus using
    functional behavioral assessment
  • Facilitating interagency programs
  • Targeted training/supports for families

27
Collaborating with Difficult Home/School
Partnerships
28
To build trusting relationships, we need to
communicate with the intent to learn from others,
not control them. Trust is the glue that makes
effective collaboration and teamwork possible.
Without trust, people become competitive or
defensive, and communication is distorted and
unreliable.
29
  • All families have strengths.
  • Parents can learn new techniques.
  • Parents have important perspectives about their
    children.
  • Most parents really care about their children.
  • Cultural differences are both valid and valuable.
  • Many family forms exist and are legitimate.

30
Focus on Positives
  • Principals and staff positively impact students'
    lives by sharing positive moments with them.
    Students/families need to see principals/staff as
    caring individuals whose primary concern is
    student learning
  • Contact parents with positive news. Particularly
    if you need to call that parent later with some
    negative news. People believe you are fair when
    you share in positive events as well as negative
    events.

31
Known and Unknown
  • Adult learners want choices
  • Adult learners want control
  • What we know grows larger, and when we know more
    we get to a point when we
  • realize how much more there is to learn
  • Asking people to change is scary we are asking
    them to shift what they value and believe
  • Our self concept as a learner is effected by our
    history

32
The Difficult Home School Partnership Handle
with Care
  • Grade retention
  • Disruptive behavior
  • Poor study habits
  • Possible special class placement
  • Referral
  • Testing
  • Medical attention
  • Unexpected parental concerns or even complaints

33
Frame of Reference
  • "Seek first to understand then to be
    understood."
  • Stephen Covey

34
-more willingness to commit to goals
35
Professional Skills for Good Communication
between Teachers and Parents
  • Good listening techniques
  • Tact
  • Kindness
  • Consideration
  • Empathy
  • Enthusiasm
  • Understanding of parent-child relationships

36
Be Pro-Active
  • Communicate and build relationships
  • Avoid judgment and imposing your value system
  • If you havent walked in their shoes, then you
    can only imagine

37
Suggestions for Difficult Home/School
Partnerships
  • Communicate concerns early
  • Before the conference
  • Keep a log of the child's unusual or disruptive
    behavior.
  • Keep track of the child's grades and missing
    assignments.
  • Keep a record of all communications with parents.
  • Keep notes and records concerning the child's
    behavior in other classrooms.

38
Establish Norms
  • How ideas will be expressed
  • How decisions will be made
  • How people will be treated
  • What will signal an end of the meeting

39
Positive Techniques for Difficult Meetings
  • Warm up with warmth
  • Treat with respect
  • Weigh your words
  • Allow for anger
  • Plan for options
  • Seek support
  • Put it in writing

40
After the Meeting
  • Follow-up
  • Confirm that all parties involved in the
    conference actually followed through on their
    commitments
  • Demonstrate your sincerity and concern for the
    child
  • Offer further help

41
Dont
  • Argue
  • Yell
  • Use sarcasm
  • Behave unprofessionally with a parent
  • Remember we are role models. It is up to us to
    show the most difficult parents a better way to
    communicate

42
Types of Difficult Parents
  • The Parents Who Rescue, Defend, and Accuse The
    Conspiracy Theory
  • The Advisor Responding to Advise from Mom Dad
  • The THREATENING Parent
  • The Limited Parent
  • The Abusive Parent
  • The Parent in Denial

43
If teachers are intimidated by angry parents
  • Dont be on the defensive
  • Maintain strong eye contact with angry or
    aggressive parents.
  • This look should NOT be an intimidating one.
    Simply maintain eye contact, and do not look
    away.
  • Open houses and conferences is not the best time
    to talk about severe or complex problems

44
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48
Placement
  • Always try to provide an environment where the
    student will be happy, safe, valued, and have a
    desire to take risks and learn. An if the parent
    insists the child be placed in an environment
    school staff believe is inappropriate, school
    staff should do everything possible to make it a
    place of learning and acceptance for the child.

49
Final Thoughts
  • It is only through establishing trust and
    convincing the parents that you do have the
    interest of their child at heart that a door or
    window may open and acceptance will take the
    place of denial.
  • Be patient and supportive. Ultimately, it is your
    continued support and caring even in the face of
    disagreement that will help bring the parent
    closer to accepting what is.

50
Final Thoughts
  • Every parent and family, no matter they have
    been viewed by the school as dysfunctional,
    trouble makers, crazy, out of touch, in denial,
    defenders, rescuers, etc. deserves to be treated
    with dignity and respect.
  • If we truly want to make a positive difference in
    every childs life we have to make a positive
    difference their parents lives as well.

51
I have come to a frightening conclusion I am the
decisive element in the home. It is my personal
approach that creates the climate. It is my daily
mood that makes the weather. As a parent, I
possess tremendous power to make a childs life
miserable or joyous. I can be a tool of torture
or an instrument of inspiration. I can humiliate
or humor, hurt or heal. In all situations it is
my response that decides whether a crisis will be
escalated or de-escalated, and a child humanized
or dehumanized. -Haim Ginott
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