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Religion

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Religion & Health: Transforming Communities. Mimi Kiser. Interfaith ... Conceptual model of determinants of health where is 'religion' most transformative? ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Religion


1
Religion Health Transforming Communities
  • Mimi Kiser
  • Interfaith Health Program
  • Emory University
  • September 2005

2
Objectives
  • Share with you
  • Background and mission of the Interfaith Health
    Program (IHP)
  • Conceptual model of determinants of health
    where is religion most transformative?
  • Two IHP Cornerstone Programs
  • Africa Religious Health Assets Program
  • Institute for Public Health and Faith
    Collaborations

3
For you
  • Where and how is your transformative affect most
    life giving?

4
Interfaith Health Program
A Movement Toward Wholeness The Interfaith
Health Program vision is for all the assets and
strengths of faith and health groups to be
aligned with the most relevant public health
knowledge and the most mature faith.
The Case for Faith and Health Our goal is
justice a word implying, shalom, peace,
wholeness, virtue and well being, not only of
individuals, but of communities and the social
connectedness from which we each can find
meaning, hope, and sustenance. (www.ihpnet.org)
5
Synthesis of Frameworks
  • Social-Ecological Framework
  • IOM, Understanding Population Health and Its
    Determinants, In 21st Century Report, 2003
  • Conceptual Model of Social Networks Impact on
    Health, Berkman Kawachi, in Social
    Epidemiology
  • Koenig, H., Handbook on Religion Health

6
Social-Ecological Model
Individuals
Social, Family, and Community Networks
Living and Working Conditions
Broad Conditions and Policies
7
Broad Conditions and Policies
Broad social, economic, cultural, health, and
environmental conditions and policies at the
global, national, state and local levels
8
Broad Conditions and Policies
Social conditions include, but are not limited
to economic inequality, urbanization, mobility,
cultural values, attitudes and policies related
to discrimination and intolerance on the basis of
race, gender, and other differences.
9
Broad Conditions and Policies
O
Other conditions at the national level might
include major sociopolitical shifts, such as
recession, war, and governmental collapse.
The built environment includes transportation,
water and sanitation, housing, and other
dimensions of urban planning.
10
Living and Working Conditions
May include Psychosocial factors Employment sta
tus and occupational factors Socioeconomic status
(income, education, occupation, wealth)
The natural and built environments
Public health services Health care services
11
Social, Family, Community Networks
Social Connectedness Social networks Social sup
port
Social integration Social engagement
12
Social, Family, Community Networks
Social network pathways of influence on health
Health behaviors Health care Access to material
resources jobs, etc. Direct physiological respo
nses leading to disease development and
prognosis
13
Individuals
Innate biological factors Health behaviors Psych
ological factors
Physiological influences
14
Religion is
  • Religion is an organized system of beliefs,
    practices, rituals, and symbols designed to (a)
    facilitate closeness to the sacred or
    transcendent (God, higher power, or ultimate
    truth/reality) and (b) foster an understanding of
    ones relationship and responsibility to others
    living together in a community.
  • Harold Koenig, Handbook on Religion and Health

15
Spirituality is
  • Spirituality is the personal quest for
    understanding answers to ultimate questions about
    life, about meaning, and about relationship to
    the sacred or transcendent, which may (or may
    not) lead to or arise from the development of
    religious rituals and the formation of
    community.
  • Harold Koenig, Handbook on Religion and Health

16
Social-Ecological Model
Individuals
Social, Family, and Community Networks
Religion
Living and Working Conditions
Broad Conditions and Policies
17
Social-Ecological Model
Individuals
Religion
Social, Family, and Community Networks
Living and Working Conditions
Broad Conditions and Policies
18
Social-Ecological Model
Religion
Individuals
Social, Family, and Community Networks
Living and Working Conditions
Broad Conditions and Policies
19
8 Congregational Strengths
  • Strength to accompany
  • Strength to convene
  • Strength to connect
  • Strength to frame, story
  • Strength to bless
  • Strength to give sanctuary
  • Strength to pray
  • Strength to endure

Deeply Woven Roots, Gary Gunderson
20
Africa Religious Health Assets
  • To develop a systematic knowledge base
    ofreligious health assets in sub-Saharan
    Africato align and enhance the work of religious
    health leaders public policy decision-makers in
    their collaborative effortto meet the challenge
    of disease such as HIV/AIDS, and to participate
    in the creation of health, especially for those
    in poverty.

21
Africa Religious Health Assets
  • Short term outcomes
  • To test and deploy a suite of research tools
    for Asset Identification and Mapping
  • To develop a framework and structure for
    application of Religious Health Assets at the
    community, regional, and national levels
  • To address high-priority issues, especially the
    HIV/AIDS pandemic

22
RHA Matrix
  • Individual phenomena may cross quadrants
  • Axes are continua

Most existing tools survey only the
Tangible/Direct quadrant
NEXT
23
Institute for Public Health and Faith
Collaborations
  • Project Objectives
  • To develop teams of public health and faith
    leaders in a broad range of communities who have
    built collaborative relationships and skills and
    are engaged in ongoing public health
    initiatives.
  • To link teams in a national network of
    faith-health collaboratives.

24
Institute for Public Health and Faith
Collaborations (contd)
  • Project Objectives
  • To establish a knowledge base and effective
    approaches in response to a growing demand for
    competency building in this unique field.
  • To foster dialogue and collaboration between
    interfaith and health organizations.

25
Institute Core Values Framework
Boundary Leadership Those who see new possibilit
ies at the edges of what is currently visible.
Those people driven to find solutions for the
pain in communities. As they meet they form .
Calling and Accountability that drives their
action towards the vision. That does not fear but
cultivates the wisdom of .
Transformative Relationships where the depth of
involvement leads to a level of knowing each
other that changes how they see themselves and
gives birth to a new
Community Transformation A community being made
whole through the aligned action of transformed
people who ask the questions of
Shared Vision of healthier communities a new a
nd possible reality for all who suffer a vision
where .
Eliminate Disparities/Nurture Common Hope as the
disparities give way, the historical despair of
our labor turns into a shared hope that drives
action and expands impact for .
Faith Health Alignment is a convergence of two
unique streams moving together creating a greater
outcome than either alone, in order to
26
For you
  • Where and how is your transformative affect most
    life giving?

27
Healthy Communities
  • A Beloved Community is a vision of total
    interrelatedness. It is the solidarity of the
    human family. It is people dependent upon each
    other. We are tied together in the single garment
    of destiny, caught in an inescapable network of
    mutuality.
  • Martin Luther King, Jr.
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