Energy Saving Tips for Conserving - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Energy Saving Tips for Conserving PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: cc2d-YjBkZ



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Energy Saving Tips for Conserving

Description:

10 Energy Saving Tips for the Home. University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension ... Photo: NREL. EnergyGuide label on appliances indicates: ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:1499
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 50
Provided by: shirleyn9
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Energy Saving Tips for Conserving


1
Energy Saving Tips for Conserving
  • University of Nebraska ? Lincoln Extension
  • Shirley Niemeyer
  • Extension Specialist
  • Housing Environment
  • and

2
Goal
  • Save energy resources, dollars reduce emissions
    by using energy conservation measures energy
    efficient products in the home.

3
Objectives
  • Identify 5 of 10 energy saving measures.
  • Choose 2 of 10 energy saving measures to use in
    own home.

4
What have you done in your own home in the last 5
years to save energy?
5
U.S. Homes are Large Energy Users!
  • About what of the total U.S. energy consumption
    does home use represent?
  • The U.S. uses what of the worlds total energy
    used?
  • What of the total U.S. carbon dioxide emissions
    are created by home use operation?

6
1. Dial Down
  • 10 Energy Saving Tips for the Home

7
Dial Down
  • Turn the thermostat down in the winter up in
    summer.
  • You save about 2 to 3 on your heating bill for
    every 1º that you lower the thermostat setting.
  • Example If thermostat is set at 73ºF in the
    winter, lowered by 3º to 70ºF, you save about
    9 or 9 cents for every dollar you spend on
    heating costs.

8
Dial Down
  • A programmable
  • thermostat, costing about
  • 30 to 200, schedules
  • temperature adjustments.
  • It can automatically cut back on heating at
    night, turn the heat up again before people
    arise, adjust for weekends.
  • If used properly, ENERGY STAR labeled thermostats
    can save up to 100 a year.

Photo UN-L, S. Niemeyer
9
2. Select Energy Efficient Products
  • 10 Energy Saving Tips for the Home

10
Select Energy Efficient Products
  • Products have 2 price tags
  • The ENERGY STAR label means the product meets or
    exceeds the increased energy efficiency
    guidelines set by the U.S. EPA U.S. Department
    of Energy for that product line.

Purchase Price
Operating Price
40/mo.
690
11
More than 40 categories of products are involved
  • Appliances
  • Battery Chargers
  • Clothes Washers
  • Dehumidifiers
  • Dishwashers
  • Refrigerators Freezers
  • Room AC
  • Room Air cleaners
  • Water Coolers
  • Electronics
  • Computers
  • Copiers
  • External Power Adapters
  • Fax Machines
  • Laptops
  • Monitors
  • Printers
  • Scanners
  • Heating Cooling Home Electronics
  • Geothermal Heat Pumps Cordless Phones
  • Insulation Power Adapters
  • Programmable Thermostat Home Audio
  • Room AC TV
  • Ventilating Fans VCRs
  • Air-source Heat Pumps DVD Products
  • Boilers Battery Chargers
  • Central AC Furnaces
  • Dehumidifier
  • Ceiling Fans
  • Lighting
  • Compact Fluorescent
  • Light Bulbs
  • Light Fixtures
  • Home Sealing (Insulation Air Sealing)
  • Roof Products
  • Windows, Doors Skylights

12
Save Energy Dollars
  • Example comparison of current Energy Star rated
    products . . .
  • Energy Star qualified
  • Refrigerator save more than 35/yr. over older
    models
  • Dishwasher about 20/yr.
  • Clothes Washer about 60/yr.
  • Room Air Conditioner about 15/yr. if replace a
    10 year old model
  • 40 pint dehumidifiers can save 20/yr.
  • Estimated TOTAL SAVED/YR. About 1,500
    (varies with model, efficiency, use cost of
    energy)

13
Look for Energy Guide Labels
  • EnergyGuide label on appliances indicates
  • 1. scale for use in comparing energy usage of
    models
  • approximate annual operating costs
  • for each model

Photo NREL
Photo DOE
14
3. Seal Air Duct Seams
  • 10 Energy Saving Tips

15
Air Ducts Can Leak
  • Typical heating cooling air ducts leak about
    15 to 20 of the heated or cooled air into
    unconditioned (unheated or non-cooled) spaces
    such as into crawlspaces, attics, walls,
    basements, garages.

Photo NREL
Mastic on duct seams joints
16
Seal Air Duct Seams
  • Seal with
  • Mastic - a paste found at some wholesale retail
    heating cooling businesses, can be brushed on
    seams.
  • Or approved foil-based duct Tape (UL 181 label)
    not regular duct tape

Photos NREL
17
Inspect Air Ducts
  • Seal insulate duct systems
  • Can improve a heating cooling systems
    efficiency by as much as 20 result in savings
    of up to 150 annually (U.S. Dept. of Energy).
  • Ask a professional heating cooling contractor
    trained to inspect test for duct leakage, to
    evaluate ductwork leakage.
  • Insulate ducts in unheated attics
  • crawlspaces. Protect any water
  • pipes in area from freezing.

Photo. U.S. DOE
18
4. Select Energy Efficient Windows
  • 10 Energy Saving Tips

19
Creating Higher Performance Windows
  • Replace single pane windows with double-pane
    windows with high performance glass or add high
    performance storm windows.
  • Installing storm windows can reduce heat loss by
    as much as 50 over a single pane window.
  • Tighten up existing windows

20

Look for High Performance
  • Windows in heating-dominated climates (cold
    climates)
  • account for up to 25 of typical houses
    heating load
  • Windows in cooling-dominated climates
  • account for up to 50 of cooling load.
  • When replacing selecting windows
  • Look for EnergyStar label EnergyGuide labels
  • Look on-line for Energy rating systems to compare
    brands styles. Go to
  • http//cpd.nfrc.org/pubsearch/psMain.asp

21
Look for High Performance
  • High performance
  • Look for National Fenestration Rating Council
    NFRC label
  • Lower U-value means better insulated. Select .35
    or below if possible
  • Select air leakage rating of about 0.3 cubic
    ft/min. or less
  • Select low-e (low emissivity) and/or selective
    coatings for the climate
  • Compare SHGC Solar Heat Gain Coefficient for
    climate orientation of home

Label example
Label program is voluntary
22
Correct Installation
  • Correct installation is essential for any window
    style.
  • Poor installation may lead to poor performance
    including air leaks water moving into inner
    wall cavity causing damaged wood siding.
  • If in doubt about the installation methods,
    contact the manufacturer.
  • For more tips on windows, go to
  • www.eren.doe.gov/consumerinfo/energy_savers/window
    s.html or
  • www.efficientwindows.org/factsheets/Nebraska.pdf

23
5. Caulk Weatherstrip
  • 10 Energy Saving Tips

24
Inspect for leaks
  • About 1/3 of air that infiltrates homes through
    holes cracks in ceilings, walls, floors
    foundations.
  • Inspect for cracks holes yearly especially
    look for leaks into the attic.

Photo VA Energy Savers Handbook
25
Caulking
  • Where are the areas that may need to be inspected
    caulked?
  • Use correct caulk for material purpose

Gap
Photo S. Niemeyer UN-L
Rope caulk
26
Weatherstripping
  • Weatherstripping comes in various forms for
    specific purposes such as door bottoms sides,
    sections of windows, around attic hatches.
  • Select a durable product inspect it yearly.
  • You may pay a little more for quality, but you
    will not replace it as often.

Examples
Source VA Energy Savers Handbook
27
6. Increase Heating Efficiency
  • 10 Energy Saving Tips

28
Increase Heating Efficiency
  • Correct sizing of heating cooling units for the
    space is essential.
  • Have systems serviced annually maintain clean
    filter systems as specified.
  • Maintenance is critical for efficiency.
  • Change/clean filters.

High Efficiency Furnace
Photo NREL
Geothermal Heat Pump
29
Replacing Choosing Heating System
  • Look for EnergyStar
  • EnergyGuide Labels
  • Also compare
  • AFUE rating (Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency)
  • HSPF Factor (Heating Seasonal Performance Factor)
    OR
  • COP (Coefficient of Performance)
  • Generally, look for higher ratings on these
    rating systems.

Photo S. Niemeyer UN-L
30
Efficiency Ratings Heating Systems
Also look for EnergyStar EnergyGuide labels
31
7. Increase Cooling Efficiency
  • 10 Energy Saving Tips

32
Selecting High Performance Cooling Equipment
  • Compare cooling efficiency ratings.
  • Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER)
  • Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER)
  • Select systems with the higher ratings.

33
  • Some systems heat cool
  • Example Ground source heat pumps

Photo NREL
Photo Virginia Energy Handbook
34
Selecting High Performance Cooling Equipment
Also look for EnergyStar EnergyGuide labels
35
Increase Cooling Efficiency
  • Place window air conditioners in windows on north
    side or shaded areas.
  • Insulate or store window air conditioners in the
    winter.
  • Trees can provide evaporative cooling.

Utah House Photo S. Niemeyer
Overhangs shade important
36
8. Check Insulation
  • 10 Energy Saving Tips

37
Is Insulation Adequate?
  • Check that the insulation is adequate in your
    home.
  • In Nebraska, generally the recommended value for
    attics is R-49 walls, R-18 floors, R-25 slab
    edge, R-8.
  • See also NE Energy Office at www.neo.ne.gov/

Source Virginia Energy Savers Handbook
Photo NREL
38
9. Switch Out Light Bulbs
  • 10 Energy Saving Tips

39
Choose Efficient Light Bulbs
  • Lighting accounts for about 5 to 10 of total
    home energy use.
  • Compact fluorescent bulbs produce the same amount
    of light or lumens as incandescent, but use less
    energy or watts.
  • Newer very efficient light source is LED (light
    emitting diodes) in traffic lights, flashlights
    appearing for home use.

Photo NREL
40
Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs
  • ENERGY STAR qualified compact fluorescent light
    bulbs
  • Provide bright, warm light while using about 2/3
    less energy than standard lighting,
  • Generate about 70 less heat,
  • Lasts up to 10 times longer than traditional
    incandescent
  • light bulbs.

Fluorescent
Photo NREL
Photo NREL
41
Replace Incandescent Bulbs
  • Replacing one traditional incandescent bulb with
    an ENERGY STAR compact fluorescent will save
    about 25 per bulb in energy costs over its
    lifetime.
  • Although the bulbs may cost more up front, they
    save over the life of the bulb.

Photo NREL
Long-life compact Fluorescent
42
10. When Off is On
  • 10 Energy Saving Tips

43
Turn Equipment Off
  • Household appliances, TVs, electronics continue
    to use energy when turned off if they power
    clocks, remote controls, other features.
  • About 40 of the electricity used to power home
    electronics is used while the products are turned
    off but continue to power features.

44
Power Down
  • Electronics in sleep mode
  • can use up to 20 of electricity needed when
    fully on.
  • Electronics with EnergyStar label can use as much
    as 50 less energy to perform same functions
  • Power down turn
  • completely off when
  • not in use.

45
Conclusion
46
Conclusion
  • Manage heat loss gain in homes through
  • Caulking, Weatherstripping Insulating
  • Sealing insulating air ducts
  • Selecting high performance windows, or adding
    storm windows or repairing existing windows
  • Selecting EnergyStar high performance
    appliances, equipment, heating cooling
    equipment, lighting, electronics other products

47
Evaluation
  • Choose 2 actions you will do to reduce energy
    use costs in your own home.
  • Fill out evaluation return to
  • Extension Educator in your
  • area or to
  • S. Niemeyer, UN-L, Room 205 HE Bldg. Lincoln NE
    68583-0804
  • THANK YOU!

48
Resources Used in Developing the Program
  • U.S. Department of Energy www.climatevision.gov
  • Energy Savers Tips on Saving Energy Money at
    Home
  • www1.eere. energy.gov/consumer/tips/
    pdfs/energy_ savers.pdf
  • Geothermal Heat PumpsDepartment of Energy
  • www.eren.doe.gov/RE/geo_heat_pumps.html
  • Consumer Information (800) 342-5468
  • www.eere.energy.gov/consumer
  • Air-Source Heat Pumps www.eere.energy.gov/consum
    er/your_home/space_heating_cooling/
  • index.cfm/mytopic01262
  • Energy Star (888) 782-7937
    www.energystar.gov
  • Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
    Clearinghouse
  • 1-800-363-3732 Fax 1-703-893-0400
  • www1.eere.energy.gov/consumer/tips/pdfs/ energy_s
    avers.pdf
  • Energy Fact Sheets www.eere.energy.gov/office_eer
    e/factsheets.html
  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
  • ENERGY STAR Programs www.energystar.gov

49
University of Nebraska ? Lincoln Extension
About PowerShow.com