Along with their prowess on horseback and their bravery in battle, the Comanche have long endured th - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Along with their prowess on horseback and their bravery in battle, the Comanche have long endured th PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: c971-YzA5N



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Along with their prowess on horseback and their bravery in battle, the Comanche have long endured th

Description:

The Comanche placed their ... The Big Cannibal Owl was a story to keep kids from being naughty. ... 1519- horses are introduced to North America by Spain. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:72
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 25
Provided by: jloe1
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Along with their prowess on horseback and their bravery in battle, the Comanche have long endured th


1
  • Along with their prowess on horseback and their
    bravery in battle, the Comanche have long endured
    the hardships of extreme weather the deep snows
    of bitter winters, the blinding sleet of spring
    and fall, and the baking heat of summer, along
    with occasional flash floods, droughts and deadly
    tornadoes.

2
Comanche
By Elias
3
Homes and Shelters
  • For the way the Comanche lived, tipis were the
    best choice.
  • The Comanche placed their tipis in sheltered
    canyons.
  • People were often in the tipi to visit, eat,
    tell stories by the fire and more.

4
Homes and Shelters
  • If opened, the flaps on top of the tipi created a
    draft, drawing out cooking smoke.
  • When it was very hot, brush shelters were a
    second option, apart from tipis.
  • Tipis were sometimes decorated with stripes
    and/or geometrical designs.

5
Food
  • Buffalo were the Comanches
  • prime food source.
  • Meat and wild plants were mainly what this tribe
    ate.
  • Elk, deer, antelope and other (yet smaller)
    animals were all hunted by the Comanche.

6
Food
  • Eating a dog was as shameful as eating their own
    grandmother.
  • Dried berries are needed to make this Comanche
    delicacy Pemmican.
  • After it was made, pemmican was stored in
    pouches/bags called parfleches.

7
Clothing
  • Buckskin robes or breechclouts were worn by men.
  • Breechclouts were also made from deerskin.
  • Skin-made materials were what this tribe dressed
    in.

8
Clothing
  • Buffalo hide moccasins had large ankle flaps the
    front and heel seams had fringes.
  • When Europe began to trade with
  • the Comanche (and only then), men began to
    wear shirts.
  • Women wore moccasins and long buckskin dresses
    with fringes.

9
Location and Environment
  • The Southern plains were well suited for the
    Comanche.
  • The Comanche once ranged over a vast area known
    as the Comanchería.
  • The Comanchería was mostly a vast and deserted
    plain.

10
Location and Environment
  • The Comanchería included parts of New Mexico,
    Oklahoma, Colorado, Kansas and Texas.
  • In the 1740s they moved South, crossing the
    Arkansas River to what is now Llano Estacado or
    the Staked Plains.
  • The Comanche conquered west Oklahoma and Texas.

11
Weapons for Hunting and Fighting
  • Bows and arrows were the Comanches main weapons.
  • Buffalo sinew made nice bowstrings, while the
    tails were made into whips.
  • The war shield was of great help to an average
    Comanche warrior. While the spear, bow and
    arrows were of offensive position.
  • Shields were made out of buckskin from the hump
    of an old buffalo.



12
Customs, Beliefs and Religion
  • According to the tribes religion, the Moon, Sun
    and many of the animals were divine beings.
  • The Comanche thought that spirits made a home
    inside the buffalo.
  • Ceremonies to the Great Spirit were made
    privately, not group-wise.

13
Customs, Beliefs and Religion
  • The Little Man, a foot-tall evil elf, was a myth
    amongst them.
  • The nomadic Comanches religion had few
    gatherings.
  • Spirits lived everywhere from the land to the
    knolls of Medicine Mounds.

14
Roles of Men,Women and Children
  • The Big Cannibal Owl was a story to keep kids
    from being naughty.
  • As they would become warriors as men, boys were
    highly respected.
  • Near the end of puberty, a boy went hunting for
    the first time. If it was a success, his father
    made it up to him with a feast.

15
Roles of Men ,Women and Children
  • If a woman started to have a newborn while her
    tribe was traveling, she merely halted, gave
    birth, and caught up later.
  • Women did many things preparing meals,
    gathering (fruits, nuts, and berries), and
    making their plain clothes.

16
Leadership and Government
  • The bands of the Comanche had a Peace Chief, a
    War Chief and a band council.
  • Quanah Parker, the great Comanche leader, was
    born at Cedar lake, Texas, the son of Peta Nocona
    and captive Cynthia Ann Parker. When his parents
    died, he grew to hate the whites.

17
Leadership and Government
  • 1849-After a cholera epidemic attacked the
    southern Plains, Buffalo hump got the Principal
    Chief title.
  • 1880s- as Principal Chief, Q.Parker raises
    seriously needed funds in the form of leased
    grazing rights on Texass ranchers.
  • 1860s- the Penateka band leader, Tosawi was
    partially guilty of several raids on Texas
    settlements.

18
Arts and Crafts
  • As they were so frequently on the move, stuff
    had to be safe from breaking.
  • 200 items were made from the buffalos teeth,
    bones, and skin.

19
Arts and Crafts
  • Men stood as the makers of tools such as knives,
    scrapers and needles, all from the bones of a
    buffalo, as well as a sort of pipe and toys for
    kids.
  • Pottery did not exist among this tribe.
  • Basketry, weaving, wood carving, and metalwork
    existed no more than pottery.

20
Interactions with Europeans
  • The English only encountered the Comanche in
    1815.
  • 1779- the Spaniards first invaded the
    Comanchería, led by Don Juan Buatista de Anza.
  • 1720-the French traded with guns and other goods.

21
Interactions with Europeans
  • Cuerno Verde, or Green Horn, was frequently
    raiding Spaniards along the Rio Grande.
  • 1519- horses are introduced to North America by
    Spain.
  • 1803-the Louisiana territory is purchased by the
    U.S, a vast area containing part of the
    Comanchería.

22
BIBLIOGRAPHY-MAJOR BOOK
  • Bial, Raymond. The Comanche. Tarrytown, New York
    Benchmark Books, 2000.

23
BIBLIOGRAPHY-MINOR BOOKS
  • Capps, Benjamin.The Indians. New York, New York
    Timelife Books,1973.
  • Rollings, Willard H. The Comanche.
    NY/Pennsylvania Chelsea House, 1989.
  • Lund, Bill.The Comanche Indians. Mankato,
    Minnesota Capstone Press, 1997

24
  • I wanted her my grandmother to teach me our
    language because our language is dying out. I
    just like expressing my language it tells me
    more about me, it tells how I live.
  • -Matthew Gomez, 11 yr. old,
  • Grandson of Geneva Woomavoyah Navarro.
About PowerShow.com