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Africanized Honey Bee Emergency Response

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Africanized Honey Bee Emergency Response – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Africanized Honey Bee Emergency Response


1
Africanized Honey Bee Emergency Response
  • University of Florida
  • Entomology Nematology
  • Sponsored by
  • Florida Dept. of Agriculture And Consumer
    Services, Division of Plant Industry, Apiculture
    Inspection

2
Africanized Honey Bees
3
10 Times as Far and 10 Times as Many
EHB
30 yds. (m)
AHB
300 yds. (m)
4
EHBs Show Little Aggression
5
AHBs on the Attack
6
Stinger Density
7
2 month old AHB Aerial Nest
8
Field Testing PPE
9
Bee suits with zippered veil and bee gloves are
the best protection.
10
Chemical spill suit with bee veil and taped cuffs
over gloves
11
Sting Shield and bill cap with Bunker /Turnout
gear
12
Secure the bottom edge of jacket with a belt or
duct tape kept bees from climbing up under the
jacket. Sleeve cuffs are usually effective at
keeping bees out.
13
This configuration provided adequate protection,
but limits vision and was hot and cumbersome.
Have absolutely no skin exposed.
Do not wear a helmet if it is safe to do so,
because bees will get under helmet and be carried
to the engine or ambulance .
14
Approach actions
15
911- Bee Sting Situation Evaluation
  • Is someone being stung now?
  • How many victims?
  • Location of Victim and the Bee Colony
  • Call back number
  • Are there any schools, day care centers, nursing
    homes, or businesses within 300 yards?

16
Bee Sting Threat Triage
  • Victim or victims being stung and unable to
    escape the bees.
  • Agitated colony resulted in victims stung, but
    escaped into vehicle or structure. They may need
    evacuation or treatment.
  • Colony present close to where people are working.
  • Colony present on property. (Not an emergency)
  • Swarm present on property. (Not an emergency)

17
Staging for Rescue
150 yards
150 ft.
Recon Vehicle as close as possible Locate all
victims Locate bee colony Direct rescue efforts
Evacuate victim
18
Subduing Bee Attacks
19
Choice of Foam
  • AFFF Aqueous Film-Forming Foam is recommended
    by Arizona F.R. Depts.
  • Class A Foam is an acceptable substitute at 2-5.
  • AFFF foam kills bees within 60 sec and knocks
    them down immediately by wetting them.
  • Plain water will only knock bees off temporarily
    and will not normally kill them.

20
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21
¾ line with integrated foam equipment using
Class A foam
Ambulance Waiting 150 yards away
22
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23
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24
Transport the Victim to the Ambulance
  • Do not have the Ambulance come into the incident
    area unless the EMTs have appropriate Personal
    Protection Equipment, especially veils.
  • While transporting the victim to the ambulance,
    try to brush or wash away as many of the bees as
    possible from the victim and the rescuers. This
    will protect the EMTs and make it easier for them
    to treat the patient.

25
Securing the Scene
  • After the victims have been evacuated, the
    defensive AHB Colony must be destroyed.
  • AHB will continue to be highly defensive for up
    to 24 hours after the initial disturbance. They
    will attack any person or pet within 150 feet of
    the colony site.
  • Pest control professionals are usually not
    prepared to subdue an agitated, highly defensive
    bee colony.
  • Destroying an agitated colony is essential for
    public safety.

26
Danger Zones
150 yds.
150 ft
27
  • Three Ossian firefighters work to free a trapped
    16-year-old Markle girl Tuesday afternoon on
    Wells County Road 1050N west of 200E as thousands
    of bees swarm out of a nest in the hollow bottom
    of the downed tree. (Photo by Justin Peeper) The
    Bluffton News-Banner August 2, 2006.

28
AHB and Your Profession
  • You may never have to rescue a victim from a
    large defensive colony in your entire career.
  • AHB colonies in trees impacted by vehicles and
    inside structures, may become common hazards in
    Florida.
  • AHB colonies in public playgrounds, parks, and
    schools may be added to your scope of work.

29
Questions?
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