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The Police and the Community Chapter 8 FORMING PARTNERSHIPS WITH THE MEDIA

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HEALTH AND GOVERNMENT STORIES 10.1 PERCENT AND 8.7 PERCENT OF AIR TIME ... AMERICANS HAVE GROWN ACCUSTOMED TO DETAILED NEWS COVERAGE OF LAW ENFORCEMENT ACTIVITIES ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: The Police and the Community Chapter 8 FORMING PARTNERSHIPS WITH THE MEDIA


1
The Police and the Community Chapter
8FORMINGPARTNERSHIPS WITH THE MEDIA
2
Objectives
  • The common goal of the media and the police
  • Why the police-media relationship is symbiotic
  • What amendment protects freedom of the press
  • What amendment guides police with their
    relationship with the media
  • What are legitimate reasons for not giving
    information to the press

3
Objectives Cont.
  • What off the record really means
  • How to enhance the safety of the media during
    explosive situations
  • Whether conflict between the police and the media
    must be dysfunctional
  • If it is justifiable to lie to the media
  • Why reporters may foul up stories
  • How officers can improve relations with the media
  • Why partnerships with the police and the media
    are essential for community policing

4
Introduction
  • The police and members of the media share the
    common goal of serving the public. They also rely
    heavily on each other but there is a conflict
    with the 1st amendment of free press and the 6th
    amendment to guarantee a suspect the right to a
    fair trial. Police need to understand the general
    protocols for media relations and have good
    department policy in place for dealing with the
    media. Police need to know how to be professional
    when interviewed and all rules of fairness

5
MUTUAL RELIANCE OF THE POLICE AND THE MEDIA
  • POLICE DEPARTMENTS AND INDIVIDUAL OFFICERS NEED
    THE MEDIA
  • THE PRESS CAN SHAPE THE PUBLIC OPINION ABOUT
    THEIR IMAGE
  • GARNER EXPLAINS THE MUTUAL DEPENDENCY (SYMBIOTIC)
  • THE NEWS BUSINESS NEEDS LAW ENFORCEMENT AS ITS
    LARGEST SINGLE SOURCE OF NEWS THAT READERS,
    VIEWERS, AND LISTENERS WANT TO KNOW ABOUT
  • LAW ENFORCEMENT NEEDS THE ACCESS TO THE PUBLIC
    THAT THE PRESS CAN PROVIDE
  • OFFICERS SHOULD BE AWARE OF WHAT RIGHTS THE
    MEDIA HAS AND THEIR MISSION, AND WHY LAW
    ENFORCEMENT DOESNT ALWAYS APPEAR IN A POSITIVE
    LIGHT IN THE MEDIA

6
THE FIRST AMENDMENT AND FREEDOM OF THE PRESS
  • THE FIRST AMENDMENT STATES THAT CONGRESS SHALL
    MAKE NO LAWABRIDGING THE FREEDOM OF SPEECH OR OF
    THE PRESS
  • THE FIRST AMENDMENT TO THE U.S. CONSTITUTION
    GUARANTEES THE PUBLICS THE RIGHT TO KNOW, THAT
    IS, FREEDOM OF THE PRESS
  • ACCORDING TO THE FREEDOM FORUM, FREEDOM OF THE
    PRESS WAS FIRST MENTIONED BY JAMES MADISON WHO
    SUPPORTED THE BILL OF RIGHTS AND FELT IT WAS
    NECESSARY TO THE HEALTH OF A DEMOCRATIC SOCIETY
  • THE PUBLICS RIGHT TO KNOW IS SO IMPORTANT THAT
    THE MEDIA OPERATE WITHOUT CENSORSHIP, BUT ARE
    SUBJECT TO LEGAL ACTION IF THEY PUBLISH UNTRUTHS

7
FIRST AMENDMENT AND FREEDOM OF THE PRESS CONT..
  • POLICE BEAT REPORTERS ARE OFTEN EAGER AND
    AGGRESSIVE IN CARRYING OUT THEIR DUTY TO INFORM
    THE PUBLIC
  • THE POLICE BEAT IS CONSIDERED A PRESTIGIOUS
    ASSIGNMENT BY MANY NEWSPAPERS AND TELEVISION
    STATIONS
  • COVERAGE OF CRIME EVENTS ALSO DRAWS INCREASED
    VIEWERSHIP AND READERSHIP, PROMPTING MANY NEWS
    ORGANIZATIONS TO GIVE TOP BILLING TO SUCH
    STORIES

8
Ist Amendment Cont..
  • MANY MEDIA MARKETS ARE UNOFFICIALLY GUIDED BY THE
    AXIOM IF IT BLEEDS, IT LEADS

9
THE MEDIA AND THE PUBLICS FEAR OF CRIME
  • THE PUBLICS RISING FEAR OF CRIME, DESPITE
    REPORTS THE CRIME RATE IS DECREASING, HAS LEAD TO
    MUCH SCRUTINY OF THE MEDIA AND THEIR PRACTICES
  • A ONE-DAY SURVEY OF LOCAL T.V. NEWS SHOWS IN 52
    METROPOLITAN AREAS REVEALED (AIR TIME)
  • CRIME-RELATED STORIES WAS 26.9 PERCENT
  • DISASTER NEWS TOPICS, A DISTANT SECOND AT 12.2
    PERCENT
  • HEALTH AND GOVERNMENT STORIES 10.1 PERCENT AND
    8.7 PERCENT OF AIR TIME
  • NEWS TOPICS RELATED TO ECONOMICS 8.5 PERCENT
  • EDUCATION 3.6 PERCENT
  • CHILDREN 2.3 PERCENT
  • PEACE 0.5 PERCENT

10
CONT MEDIA AND PUBLICS FEAR OF CRIME
  • THE RECENT MEDIA FOCUS ON VIOLENCE IN SCHOOLS HAS
    ALSO DRAWN WIDESPEAD CRITICISM
  • RELATIVE INFREQUENCY OF VIOLENT CRIME IN OUR
    SOCIETY ACTUALLY INCREASES ITS NEWSWORTHINESS
    AND THE AMOUNT OF MEDIA COVERAGE IT RECEIVES
  • ACCORDING TO RESEARCHERS, POLITICAL LEADERS AND
    LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICIALS USE THE MEDIA TO SERVE
    PROPOGANDA FUNCTIONS IN THE STATES IDEOLOGICAL
    MACHINERY AND TO PROMOTE THEIR LAW-AND-ORDER
    CRIME CONTROL AGENDAS
  • THE MEDIA ALSO PLAY A SIGNIFICANT ROLE IN HOW THE
    PUBLIC VIEWS THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM,
    INCLUDING LAW ENFORCEMENT

11
THE MEDIA AND THE POLICE IMAGE
  • THE PUBLICS IMAGE OF THE POLICE IS SHAPED
    LARGELY BY WHAT THEY SEE ON T.V. AND MOST OF WHAT
    THEY SEE IS FICTIONAL
  • A STUDY OF NATIONAL, BIG CITY AND SMALL TOWN T.V.
    NEWSCASTS REVEALED
  • ALL LEVELS OF NEWSCASTS IN THE SAMPLE AIRED MORE
    POSITIVE THAN NEGATIVE STORIES ABOUT THE POLICE,
    THERE WAS A DIFFERENCE IN DEGREE
  • A SECOND FINDING IS THAT T.V. NEWS TENDS TO
    PORTRAY THE POLICE AS CRIME FIGHTERS, NATIONAL
    (84) AND BIG CITY (72) AND SMALL TOWN (63)

12
Police Image Cont..
  • THE DEPICTION OF POLICE ON T.V. NEWS INFLUENCES
    HOW VIEWERS JUDGE THE EFFECTIVENESS AND INTEGRITY
    OF THE LOCAL POLICE

13
THE MEDIAS IMPACT ON CRIMINAL JUSTICE
  • THE POWER OF THE MEDIA AND THEIR COVERAGE CAN
    INFLUENCE THE OPERATIONS OF THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE
    SYSTEM AND EVEN THE DISPOSITION OF INDIVIDUAL
    CASES
  • THE IMPACT OF A HIGHLY PUBLICIZED CASE HAVING A
    RIPPLING EFFECT THAT SPREADS THROUGHOUT THE
    JUDICIAL SYSTEM AND EFFECTS THE ENTIRE PROCESS IS
    REFERRED TO AS THE NEWS MEDIA ECHO EFFECT
  • DEFENDANTS IN A SIMILAR CRIME CATEGORY MAY BE
    TREATED DIFFERENTLY WITHIN THE CRJ SYSTEM HAD
    SUCH A HIGH PROFILE CASE NOT PRECEDED THEIRS
  • ECHO-EFFECTS ARE A MEDIA-INDUCED RECONSTRUCTION
    OF REALITY CONCERNING THE IMPORTANCE OF A SET OF
    CASES

14
FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT
  • FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT (FOIA) GOVERNS WHAT
    POLICE CAN AND CANNOT DISCLOSE
  • FOIA ESTABLISHES A PRESUMPTION THAT RECORDS IN
    THE POSSESSION OF AGENCIES AND DEPARTMENTS OF THE
    EXECUTIVE BRANCH OF THE U.S. GOVERNMENT ARE
    ACCESSIBLE TO THE PEOPLE
  • THE NEED TO KNOW STANDARD HAS BEEN REPLACED BY
    THE RIGHT TO KNOW DOCTRINE
  • LAWS SUCH AS THE PUBLIC RECORD LAWS ARE ENACTED
    TO PROTECT THE RIGHTS OF CITIZENS UNDER SUSPICION
    OF BREAKING THE LAW, AS GUARANTEED BY THE SIXTH
    AMENDMENT

15
Freedom of Information Act Cont..
  • The media cannot go to a fortune teller for their
    information
  • The FOIA clearly states what police can release
    and what they cannot and what is discretionary

16
THE SIXTH AMENDMENT, SUSPECTS RIGHTS AND
CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS
  • THE SIXTH AMENDMENT ESTABLISHES THAT IN ALL
    CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS, THE ACCUSED SHALL ENJOY
    THE RIGHT TO A SPEEDY AND PUBLIC TRIAL
  • THE SIXTH AMENDMENT GUARANTEES SUSPECTS THE RIGHT
    TO A FAIR TRIAL AND AN IMPARTIAL JURY
  • LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS OFTEN TRY TO PROTECT
    INFORMATION THEY DEEM IMPERATIVE TO KEEP OUT OF
    THE MEDIA, AND MAY THEREFORE BE AT ODDS WITH
    REPORTERS

17
6th Amendment Continued
  • SUCH CONFLICTS ARISE WHEN POLICE TRY TO PREVENT
    PUBLIC DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION THAT MAY TIP OFF
    A CRIMINAL OF IMPENDING ARREST
  • THE PARTIES CONFLICTING INTERESTS MAY RESULT IN
    ANTAGONISM

18
VICTIM PRIVACY RIGHTS
  • THE FOIA PROTECTS THE RIGHTS OF SOME PEOPLE SUCH
    AS SEX CRIME VICTIMS
  • VICTIMS MAY EASILY BE CAUGHT OFF GUARD BY
    AGGRESSIVE MEDIA PERSONNEL AND MAY UNWITTINGLY
    PUT THEMSELVES OR THE INVESTIGATION AT RISK BY
    AGREEING TO AN INTERVIEW
  • TO HELP VICTIMS AND PROTECT WITNESS RIGHTS, AND
    SAFEGUARD THE INVESTIGATION, DEPARTMENTS HAVE
    BEGUN DISTRIBUTING MEDIA RELATIONS ADVISORY CARDS
  • THE BACK OF THE CARDS GIVES THE PHONE NUMBER FOR
    THE PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICER AND THE VICTIM
    SERVICES SECTION
  • SUCH CARDS, HOWEVER, HAVE CAUSED CONCERN AMONG
    SOME JOURNALISTS WHO CONTEND THE ADVISORIES WILL
    INTERFERE WITH NEWS GATHERING

19
CONFLICT BETWEEN THE MEDIA AND POLICE
  • THE PRESS AND THE POLICE ARE TWO POWERFUL FORCES
    IN OUR SOCIETY THAT DEPEND ON ONE ANOTHER BUT ARE
    OFTEN HOSTILE TOWARD AND MISTRUST EACH OTHER
  • LAW ENFORCEMENT DESCRIBED THE MEDIA AS
    DEMANDING, UNETHICAL, UNCARING, BIASED, ARROGANT,
    AND NEGATIVE
  • THE MEDIA DESCRIBED LAW ENFORCEMENT AS EVASIVE,
    UNCOOPERATIVE, NON-TRUSTING, SELF-IMPORTANT,
    INDIFFERENT, AND WITHHOLDING
  • MEDIA PARTICIPANTS COMMENTS THERE IS A NEED TO
    GET INFORMATION FROM LAW ENFORCEMENT IN A TIMELY
    MANNER TO KEEP THE PUBLIC INFORMED
  • POLICE PARTICIPANT COMMENTS THERE ARE TIMES
    DURING AN ONGOING INVESTIGATION THAT DIVULGING
    INFORMATION WOULD JEOPARDIZE THE CASE

20
SOURCES OF CONFLICT
  • THE THREE MOST BASIC VARIETY OF SOURCES BTWEEN
    THE MEDIA AND THE POLICE ARE
  • COMPETING OBJECTIVES THE FIRST AMENDMENT
    GUARANTEE OF FREEDOM OF THE PRESS, IS OFTEN
    INCOMPATIBLE WITH THE SIXTH AMENDMENT GUARANTEE
    OF THE RIGHT TO A FAIR TRIAL AND PROTECTION OF A
    DEFENDANTS RIGHTS
  • STEREOTYPING A DANGEROUS HABIT THAT CAN GREATLY
    IMPEDE GOOD WORKING RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN LAW
    ENFORCEMENT AND MEMBERS OF THE MEDIA

21
Conflict Cont..
  • CONTRADICTORY APPROACHES ANOTHER CONFLICT
    BETWEEN LAW ENFORCEMENT AND THE MEDIA IS THE
    DANGER MEMBERS OF THE MEDIA MAY EXPOSE THEMSELVES
    TO IN GETTING A STORY
  • THE POLICE ARE OBLIGATED TO PROTECT THEM

22
BENEFITS OF CONFLICT
  • CONFLICT BETWEEN THE POLICE AND THE MEDIA IS
    NECESSARY BECAUSE EACH MUST REMAIN OBJECTIVE AND
    ABLE TO CONSTRUCTIVELY CRITICIZE THE OTHER WHEN
    NEEDED
  • THE NEWS MEDIA HAVE A DISTINCT ROLE IN A
    DEMOCRACY TO OVERSEE THE ACTIONS OF THE
    TRADITIONAL THREE BRANCHES OF GOVERNMENT AND
    THEREBY PREVENT ABUSES OF POWER BY THOSE BRANCHES
  • CONFLICT NEED NOT BE DYSFUNCTIONAL
  • CONFLICT CAN STIMULATE PEOPLE TO GROW AND CHANGE
  • CONFLICT CAN DIFFUSE DEFENSIVENESS

23
GENERAL POLICIES AND PROTOCOL FOR MEDIA RELATIONS
  • MOST AGENCIES HAVE DEVELOPED WRITTEN POLICIES
    GOVERNING RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO THE PRESS
  • THESE POLICIES RECOGNIZE THE RIGHT OF REPORTERS
    TO GATHER INFORMATION AND OFTEN DIRECT OFFICERS
    TO COOPERATE WITH THE MEDIA
  • OFFICERS WHO ENCOUNTER AND RELEASE INFORMATION TO
    THE MEDIA ARE EXPECTED TO DISPLAY THE HIGHEST
    LEVEL OF PROFESSIONALISM
  • MANY AGENCIES HAVE SPECIFIC POLICIES AND PROTOCOL
    TO GUIDE OFFICERS DURING MEDIA INTERVIEWS

24
BEING PROFESSIONAL WHEN BEING INTERVIEWED
  • IT HAS BEEN SAID THAT YOU DONT ARGUE WITH
    PEOPLE WHO BUY INK BY THE BARREL
  • KNOW AND FOLLOW YOUR AGENCIES MEDIA GUIDELINES
  • FIND OUT WHAT YOU ARE TO BE INTERVIEWED ABOUT AND
    GATHER THE FACTS YOU NEED TO RESPOND TO
    ANTICIPATED QUESTIONS
  • REMAIN COURTEOUS AND IN CONTROL OF YOUR EMOTIONS
  • DO NOT WANDER OR WASTE WORDS
  • ALWAYS TELL THE TRUTH
  • IF YOU DONT KNOW THE ANSWER, SAY SO
  • AVOID USING NO COMMENT
  • CHOOSE YOUR WORDS CAREFULLY
  • MAINTAIN GOOD EYE CONTACT AND DO NOT HESITATE TO
    SMILE IF APPROPRIATE

25
LYING TO THE MEDIA
  • LYING TO THE PRESS, MAKING PROMISES THAT YOU CAN
    NOT KEEP OR MISLEADING REPORTERS IS A BAD IDEA
  • AGENCIES AND OFFICERS WHO MAKE A PRACTICE OF
    DECEIVING THE MEDIA ARE AT GREAT RISK OF LOSING
    PUBLIC CONFIDENCE
  • THE DECISION TO LIE TO THE MEDIA REMAINS, IN
    EFFECT, A DECISION TO LIE TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC
  • FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT TO HAVE EFFECTIVE PUBLIC
    RELATIONS, IT MUST BUILD BRIDGES OF COOPERATION
  • THREE ESSENTIAL PILLARS OF THOSE BRIDGES ARE
    MUTUAL TRUST, MUTUAL CREDIBILITY, AND MUTUAL
    RESPECT LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICIALS CONTEMPLATING
    INTENTIONAL DECEPTION TO THE MEDIA SHOULD ASK
  • IF THE OFFICIAL WOULD BE WILLING TO PUBLICLY
    EXPLAIN WHY DECEPTION WAS USED
  • IF THEY ARE WILLING TO ACCEPT ANY CONSEQUENCES OF
    THE PUBLIC DISCLOSURE

26
PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICERS
  • SOME POLICE DEPARTMENTS FEEL COMFORTABLE ALLOWING
    ANY MEMBER TO TALK TO THE MEDIA AND PROVIDE
    INFORMATION
  • SOME DEPARTMENTS DISCOURAGE INDIVIDUAL OFFICERS
    FROM TALKING TO REPORTERS AND INSTEAD DESIGNATE
    PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICERS (PIOS)
  • (PIOS) DISSEMINATE ALL INFORMATION TO THE MEDIA
  • (PIOS) ARE OFFICERS TRAINED IN PUBLIC RELATIONS
    WHO TRY TO CONSISTENTLY PROVIDE ACCURATE
    INFORMATION, WHILE CONTROLLING LEAKS OF
    CONFIDENTIAL OR INACCURATE DETAILS AND MANAGING
    CONTROVERSIAL OR NEGATIVE SITUATIONS TO THE
    DEPARTMENTS BENEFIT
  • (PIOS) HAVE A SIGNIFICANT AMOUNT OF
    RESPONSIBILITY
  • WHEN POIS PROPERLY CARRY OUT THEIR
    RESPONSIBILITIES, THEY CAN IMPROVE POLICE-MEDIA
    RELATIONS

27
POLICIES REGARDING PHOTOGRAPHING AND VIDEOTAPING
AT CRIME SCENES
  • THEY SAY A PICTURE IS WORTH A THOUSAND WORDS
  • AMERICANS HAVE GROWN ACCUSTOMED TO DETAILED NEWS
    COVERAGE OF LAW ENFORCEMENT ACTIVITIES
  • IN WILSON V. LAYNE THE U.S. SUPREME COURT
    CONFRONTED THE ISSUE OF WHETHER A MEDIA PRESENCE,
    AT LAW ENFORCEMENT INVITATION, TO DOCUMENT POLICE
    ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED ON PRIVATE PREMISES VIOLATED
    PRIVACY RIGHTS PROTECTED BY THE FOURTH AMENDMENT
  • THE COURTS RULED WHILE LAW ENFORCEMENT DOES
    POSSESS A LEGITAMATE OBJECTIVE IN PUBLICIZING ITS
    EFFORTS TO COMBAT CRIME, THOSE OBJECTIVES WERE
    NOT SUFFICIENT TO OUTWEIGH THE RIGHT OF
    RESIDENTIAL PRIVACY AT THE CORE OF THE FOURTH
    AMENDMENT

28
Photographing and Videotaping Cont..
  • ANOTHER ONCE COMMON POLICE PRACTICE WHERE
    SUSPECTS WERE PARADED BEFORE THE HUGRY EYES OF
    THE MEDIA WAS KNOWN AS PERP WALKS

29
IMPROVING RELATIONS WITH THE MEDIA
  • LAW ENFORCEMENT HAS SUFFERED A NUMBER OF BODY
    BLOWS TO TO ITS IMAGE IN THE LAST COUPLE OF
    YEARS
  • AN IMPORTANT FIRST STEP TO IMPROVE RELATIONS WITH
    THE MEDIA IS TO BE AWARE OF THREE BASIC REASONS
    WHY REPORTERS MAY FOUL UP A STORY
  • REPORTERS MAY BUNGLE A STORY DUE TO IGNORANCE,
    OVERSIMPLIFICATION, OR TIME CONSTRAINTS
  • TO IMPROVE POLICE-MEDIA RELATIONS
  • INFORM PRESS OF DEPARTMENTS POLICIES
  • SIMPLIFY YOUR INFORMATION
  • AVOID POLICE JARGON
  • RESPECT REPORTERS

30
CONT IMPROVING RELATIONS WITH THE MEDIA
  • WEXLER OFFERS THE FOLLOWING SUGGESTIONS FOR
    WORKING EFFECTIVELY WITH THE MEDIA
  • GET TO KNOW EDITORS AND REPORTERS AT
    NON-STRESSFUL TIMES
  • DONT OVERLOOK THE EDITORIAL BOARDS AND OP-ED
    PAGE EDITORS OF NEWSPAPERS OF T.V.
  • BE CAREFUL ABOUT GIVING EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEWS TO
    NATIONAL CORRESPONDENTS WHILE YOU BYPASS LOCAL
    REPORTS

31
STRATEGIES FOR DEVELOPING PARTNERSHIPS WITH THE
MEDIA
  • THE NATIONAL CRIME PREVENTION COUNCIL ADVOCATES
    THE STRATEGY OF USING THE LOCAL MEDIA AS AN ALLIE
    IN THE POLICE EFFORT TO FOCUS ATTENTION ON
    COMMUNITY-BASED CRIME PREVENTION PROJECTS AND
    ORGANIZATIONS
  • IT HAS BEEN SUGGESTED THAT BECAUSE THE MEDIA
    COVERS ISSUES OF PUBLIC INTEREST, PRUDENT
    MANAGERS SHOULD REALIZE THE IMPORTANCE OF
    PROACTIVELY USING THE MEDIA AS A TOOL TO GET
    THEIR DEPARTMENTS MESSAGE OUT TO THE COMMUNITY
  • DEPARTMENTS HAVE CAUGHT ON TO THE EFFECTIVENESS
    OF TELEVISED LAW ENFORCEMENT PROGRAMS
  • BLUELINE CPD CAPITALIZES ON THE LATEST TECHNOLOGY
    TO PRODUCE A FORMAT THEY CALL INTERACTIVE T.V.

32
STRATEGIES PARTNERSHIPS WITH THE MEDIA Cont..
  • BLUELINE CPD USES THE COMPUTERIZED CRIMEMAPPING
    CAPABILITY OF THE GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION
    SYSTEM(GIS)
  • (PIOS) FOUND A MUTUALLY ACCEPTABLE SOLUTION TO
    THE PROBLEM OF NEEDING TO GET INFORMATION TO ALL
    THE MEDIA RAPIDLY AND THEY FORMED A PAGER
    INFORMATION NETWORK (PIN)
  • (PIN) THE PIO CAN MAKE ONE PHONE CALL FROM
    ANYWHERE, AND SIMULTANEOUSLY NOTIFY ALL THE MEDIA
    IN THE NETWORK
  • MEDIA PERSONNEL ARE TYPICALLY TO BUSY AND MAY BE
    RELUCTANT TO COMMIT TO OR TAKE PART IN NEW
    PROJECTS OR TIME-CONSUMING ACTIVITIES
  • AS POLICE DEPARTMENTS ADOPT THE
    COMMUNITY-POLICING PHILOSOPHY AND IMPLEMENT
    STRATEGIES, PUBLIC SUPPORT IS VITAL
  • THE MEDIA CAN PLAY AN IMPORTANT ROLE IN OBTAINING
    THAT SUPPORT

33
The End
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