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The National Evaluation and Technical Assistance Center for the Education of Children and Youth Who

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Title: The National Evaluation and Technical Assistance Center for the Education of Children and Youth Who


1
The National Evaluation and Technical Assistance
Center for the Education of Children and Youth
Who Are Neglected, Delinquent, or At-Risk
  • Tuesday Talk Presentation, Transition
  • www.neglected-delinquent.org

2
Why Transition is Important
  • To insure that youth returning from correctional
    institutions are prepared to return to society
    and resume educational services in their home
    communities.
  • To reduce the fiscal and social consequences of
    recidivism.
  • To facilitate the acquisition of knowledge,
    skills and attitudes to be successful in society.

3
Making the Transition Easier
  • No Child Left Behind, Title I, Part D, requires
    schools to make children and youth returning from
    corrections a priority
  • Share accountability with other system partners
  • Re-entry/transition supports are funded by
    education and Office of Juvenile Justice
    Delinquency Prevention
  • Support also exists in the Department of Labor

4
The Goal of Transition is to Increase Engagement
(Bullis)
  • Engagement
  • School or working
  • School and working
  • No recidivism (no new charges or reincarceration)

5
Policy Support for Collaboration Between and
Among Schools and Agencies
  • Current laws support this linkage and
    collaboration and strongly promote interagency
    agreements for the coordination and delivery of
    services from other public agencies that have
    responsibility for paying or providing needed
    services (IDEA 34CFR300.142).

6
More Basics on Transition
  • Written Procedures for the following transition
    actions
  • Exchange of Information (transfer of records
    prior to a students move from one
    place/jurisdiction to another)
  • Joint Program Planning before Transition
  • Feedback after each change of placement
  • Specific pre-release programs (social skills,
    survival skills, independent living skills,
    pre-employment training, safety plans and law
    related education).
  • Edgar et al., 1987 Maddox et al., 1984 Nelson,
    Rutherford Wolford, 1987) (Coffey Gemignani,
    1994)

7
EDJJ Definition of Transition
  • A coordinated set of activities for the student,
    designed within an outcome-oriented process,
    which promotes successful movement from the
    community to a correctional program setting, and
    from a correctional program setting to
    post-incarceration activities (Griller-Clark,
    2003).

8
Portfolio Components Arizona Transition Project,
ASU
  • Academic Assessment
  • Vocational Assessment
  • Transition Interview
  • Resource Packet
  • Vital Records
  • Social Security Card
  • Birth certificate
  • Immunization records
  • Resume
  • Special Education Rights
  • Special Education Records
  • Copy of IEP
  • Copy of Psychoed
  • Transcripts
  • Credit Analysis
  • Certificate, diploma, GED
  • Work samples

9
What else do we know about coordinated
transition planning?
  • Increases likely of timely transfer of records
  • Increases rate of employment
  • Increases rate of high school completion
  • The more youth are engaged the less likely they
    are to recidivate (Bullis, Yovanoff, Mueller
    Havel, 2002)
  • Without it, these youth dont stand a chance
  • Increases return on investment by tax payers

10
Other Things That MUST Be In the Transition Plan
  • Housing and/or Independent living
  • Financial Plan
  • Therapy Plan
  • Daily living skills
  • Personal relationships (family/mentor)
  • Community resources (System of
    Care/school/work/employment training/)
  • Safety Plan/Crisis Plan
  • Health and fitness
  • Leisure and recreation
  • Related service providers

11
Successful Transition for Correctional Education
Setting to a Community School Must Include
  • Involvement by the youth, family and
    representatives of all systems/agencies involved
    in the youths life
  • A transition plan based on the Needs, Interests
    and Preferences of the Youth and his/her family
  • All support services needed by the youth
  • Caring adult, advocate or mentor who prioritizes
    education to help the family carry out this
    complex responsibility.

12

DJJ Student Transition Model
Timeline Within 30
days Individualized Education Review within
first 90 days Treatment Team Review every 90
days 60 days prior to release 10 days prior
to release
Staff Responsible School Counselor Transition
Counselor School Administrator Cottage Life
Supervisor School Administrator. School
Counselor Transition Counselor School
Administrator Cottage Life Supervisor School
Counselor Transition Counselor Parent/Guardian Sc
hool Counselor Transition Counselor Juvenile
Probation and Parole Specialist Parent/Guardian
Rev. August 25, 2005
Intake Assessment Student Plan Portfolio
Class Schedule Student Transition
Orientation Ongoing Student Progress
Update Student Assessment Grade
Review Vocational Review GED Review Revise
Plan for Services Release Review Placement
Recommendation Portfolio Review Transition
Activities Review Release Date Administer Post
Test Exit Portfolio Completed Referrals to
JPPS
Portfolio provided to Youth
Career Facilitator JPPS
YDC File
Outcomes Local School Enrollment H.S. Diploma
GED Employment Military Enlistment Post-Secon
dary Enrollment-Technical College
13
Transition Resources
  • National Resources
  • EDJJ (301) 405-6462
  • Office of Correctional Education (202) 205-5621
  • Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
    Prevention
  • Re-entry Initiative www.ojjdp.ncjrs.org
  • The Center for Law and Education (202) 986-3000
  • The Center on Juvenile Criminal Justice (202)
    678-9282
  • National Juvenile Detention Association (606)
    622-6259
  • Correctional Education Association (301)
    918-1915
  • Council of Administrators of Special Education
    (505) 243-7622
  • Youth Law Center (415) 543-3379
  • Community Information and Referral
    (www.cirs.org)
  • Local Resources
  • State Department of Education
  • State Department of Juvenile Justice
  • State Universities

14
REFERENCES
  • Bullis, M. (2004). Hard questions and final
    thoughts on the community transition of
    adolescents with emotional or behavioral
    disorders. In D. Cheney (Ed.), Transition of
    secondary students with emotional or behavioral
    disabilities (263-279). Arlington, VA Council
    for Exceptional children, Division on Behavioral
    Disorders and Division for Career Development and
    Transition.
  • Bullis, M., Yovanoff, P., Havel, E. (2004).
    The importance of getting started right Further
    examination of the community engagement of
    formerly incarcerated youth. The Journal of
    Special Education, 38, 80-94.
  • Cheney, D., Bullis, M. (2004). Research issues
    in the transition of students with emotional or
    behavioral disorders. In R. Rutherford, M.M.
    Quinn, S. Mathur (Eds.), Handbook of research
    in behavioral disorders (pp. 369-384). New York
    Guilford Press.
  • Johnson, M., Bullis, M., Benz, M., Hollenbeck,
    K. (2004). Teaching job-related social skills
    Work adjustment for gainful employment success.
    Longmont, CO Sopris-West.
  • Clark, H. (Rusty) Davis, M. (2000). Transition
    to Adulthood A Resource for Assisting Young
    People with Emotional or Behavioral Difficulties.
    Baltimore, MD Brookes Publishing
  • Clark, H. (Rusty) Davis, M. (2000). Transition
    to Adulthood A Resource for Assisting Young
    People with Emotional or Behavioral Difficulties.
    Baltimore, MD Brookes Publishing

15
MORE REFERENCES
  • Bullis, M., Fredericks, H. D. (Eds.). (2002).
    Providing effective vocational/transition
    services to adolescents with emotional and
    behavioral disorders. Champaign-Urbana, IL
    Research Press.
  • Bullis, M., Yovanoff, P, Mueller, G., Havel, E.
    (2002). Life on the outs - Examination of the
    facility-to-community transition of incarcerated
    adolescents. Exceptional Children, 69, 7-22.
  • Bullis, M., Walker, H., Sprague, J. (2001). A
    promise unfulfilled Social skill training with
    at-risk and antisocial children and youth.
    Exceptionality, (1 2), 69-92.
  • Coffey and Gemignani Education of At-risk and
    Delinquent Youth (Coffey Gemignani, 1994).
  • Todis, B., Bullis, M., DAmbrosio, R., Schultz,
    R., Waintrup, M. (2001). Overcoming the odds
    Qualitative examination of resilience among
    adolescents with antisocial behaviors.
    Exceptional Children, 68, 119-139.
  • Unruh, D., Bullis, M. Booth, C., Pendergrass.
    (2005). Project SUPPORT A description and
    evaluation of a transition project for formerly
    incarcerated adolescents with special education
    and mental health disorders. In M. Epstein, K.
    Kutash, A. Duchnowski (Eds.), Outcomes for
    children and youth with emotional and behavioral
    disorders and their families Programs and
    evaluation best practices (pp. 375-397). Austin,
    TX PRO-ED.
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