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APPRENTICESHIP

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Apprenticeship history, current structure. How Apprenticeship works in ... Workforce realities: aging boomers, shrinking birth rates, exodus of Wisconsin talent ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: APPRENTICESHIP


1
APPRENTICESHIP WIA
  • A Strategic Advantage

2
Apprenticeship A Strategic Advantage
  • AGENDA
  • Apprenticeship history, current structure
  • How Apprenticeship works in Wisconsin
  • Benefits to employers the workforce
  • Apprenticeship by the numbers
  • Potential benefits to WIA performance
  • Partnership opportunities

3
What is an Apprentice?
4
History of Apprenticeship
  • Apprenticeship has produced highly skilled
    craftsmen for more than 4,000 years

5
History of Apprenticeship
  • Nations 1st apprenticeship law Wisconsin 1911
  • Objectives
  • Provide industries with skilled labor
  • Provide career opportunities for youth
  • Protect individuals who enterapprenticeships
  • Same law created Wisconsin Vocational School
    system to provide related classroom instruction

6
What is an Apprenticeship?
  • Its a binding agreement in which
  • Apprentices earn a progressive wage while
    training under journeyworker(s) on the job, and
  • Industry-based instructors provide theoretical
    (classroom) training, and
  • Apprentices can achieve journeyworker status.
  • Its industry-driven and industry-designed
  • Its regulated by the state

7
What is Apprenticeship?
Apprenticeship expedites expertise!
Apprenticeship ApproachClassroom training with
structuredhands-on experience
Expertise(Education Experience)
Experience
ExpertiseGap
Traditional ApproachClassroom training followed
by unstructured hands-on experience
Classroom Training
Over Time
8
Apprenticeship Earning Potential
Five-Year College Education vs. Apprenticeship
9
Apprenticeship Training
  • Supervised, structured on-the-job training
  • Provided by the sponsor
  • The job is primary component of apprenticeship
  • 90 of training is learned on the job
  • Written standards governthe on-the-job training
  • Work must be supervisedby skilled journeyworker

10
Apprenticeship Training
  • Related (classroom) Instruction
  • Theoretical and technical, as required by WI law
  • Primarily through Wisconsins Technical Colleges
  • Employer pays apprentices normalwage while
    attending
  • Apprentice pays fortuition books

11
Apprenticeship Credential
  • Average time to completion four years
  • Formal credential upon completion
  • Journeyworker skill level
  • Acknowledged nationwide
  • Portable nationwide
  • 39 credits towards AAS degree

12
Apprenticeable Trades
  • Must be approved by DWD/BAS as meeting the
    following criteria
  • Involves manual, mechanical or technical skills
  • Customarily learned through on-the-job training
  • Require related instruction to supplement OJT
  • Recognized throughout an industry
  • Not part of an already recognized trade

13
Apprenticeable Trades
  • Three employment sectors
  • Construction Trades
  • Industrial Trades
  • Service Trades
  • Each trade has its own selectionprocess and
    requirements
  • Approximately half of Wisconsins10,000
    apprentices are in construction trades

14
Apprenticeable Trades
  • Examples of Current Apprenticeships

Bricklayer Carpenter Cement Mason/Concrete
Finisher Construction Craft Laborer Electrician En
vironmental System Technician Glazier Heat
Frost Insulator Ironworker Operating
Engineer Painter Decorator Plasterer Plumber Roo
fer Sheet Metal Worker Sprinklerfitter
Steamfitter Teledata Communications Instrument
Technician Machinist Maintenance
Mechanic Millwright Metal Fabricator Pipefitter To
ol and Die Maker Tool Maker Barber/Cosmetologist C
ook/Chef Correctional Officer Electric Line
Worker Fire Service Funeral Director
15
Apprenticeable Trades
  • Examples of Potential Apprenticeships
  • Biotechnology Lab Assistant
  • Information Technology
  • Health Support Specialist, CNA, LPN,
  • Allied Healthcare (Radiology Tech, Mammography
    Tech, etc.)
  • Social/Family Service Worker
  • AODA Counselor
  • Dental Laboratory Technician
  • Surveying Technician
  • Legal Clerk
  • Hazardous Abatement Worker
  • ---and many more!

16
Apprenticeship Sponsors
  • Sponsors are
  • Joint (employer/union) Apprenticeship Committees
  • Individual Employers
  • Employer Association Apprenticeship Committees
  • More than 3,000 Wisconsin employers train
    apprentices annually

17
Apprenticeship Sponsors
  • Sponsors agree to
  • Plan, administer payfor the program
  • Abide by state federalapprenticeship
    regulations
  • Form a three-way contract

18
Apprenticeship Benefit to Employers
  • Opportunity to formally train employees
  • In employers facility, on their equipment, with
    their customers, to fit their particular needs
  • Training promotion path for unskilled employees
  • Structured method to capture expertise of
    experienced, skilled employees
  • Brings new techniques ideas into the company
  • Employee wage is commensurate with skill

19
Apprenticeship Partnership that Works
Employers and industries get a reliable source of
skilled labor and flexible training options
Employees get valuable training opportunity and a
portable credential without leavingthe workforce
Local workforce . system has an avenue to
promote training opportunities in key industries
Educational partners provide industry
training in a way that doesnt stretch capacity
20
Apprenticeship By the Numbers
Apprenticeship Enrollment Follows the Economy
21
Apprenticeship By the Numbers
Apprenticeship Earnings Equal 4-year College
Earnings
22
Apprenticeship By the Numbers

Sources DWD Bureau of Apprenticeship Standards
BASIS data WTCS Graduate Follow-upReport
2006-2007 WIA Annual Report for PY 2007 WDVR
State Plan FFY 2009
23
Positive Environment for Growth
  • Apprentice Utilization Requirements
  • State 10 apprentices Other public few,
    similar
  • Stimulus-related Recovery Reinvestment
  • Construction sector funding
  • Healthcare seeking workforce solutions
  • State push for WIA/Apprenticeship partnership
  • Workforce realities aging boomers, shrinking
    birth rates, exodus of Wisconsin talent

24
Apprenticeship Around the Nation
  • Washington State
  • Partnering with K-12 pre-apprenticeship
  • 1M (Govs WIA 10) targetingapprenticeship
    integration
  • Kansas State
  • Federal - Health Support Specialist
  • WIA help support apprenticeship staff
  • Federal USDOL/ETA
  • Partnership initiatives and grants

25
Opportunities for Action
  • Improve the applicant pipeline to Apprenticeship
  • Train Job Center staff on Apprenticeship
  • Clarify funding opportunities (OJT, ITAs,
    Custom)at all levels federal, state local
  • Explore pilots that expand / improve access
  • Establish guidance on apprenticeship structure
    WIA performance measures
  • Support expanded adult pre-apprenticeshiptraining
    , especially for minorities and females

26
Opportunities for Action
  • Expand Apprenticeship to new employers
  • Partner with WDBs to promote apprenticeshipas an
    effective workforce development strategy
  • Establish clear and effective info referral for
    staff
  • Conduct outreach to business associations and
    economic development to expand awareness
  • Articulate linkage to High Growth, High Wage jobs
  • Include focus on green, sustainable technologies

27
Recommendations Next Steps
  • Lead in the integration of Apprenticeship into
    the Workforce System

28
APPRENTICESHIP WIA
Thank Youfor Your Time Attention!
  • A Strategic Advantage
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