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Title: Lead Safe Work Practices Training Program


1
Lead Safe Work Practices
Training Program
Work smart, Work wet, Work clean To Work safe
NC CHILDHOOD LEAD POISONING PREVENTION PROGRAM
2
Contacts ALAN HUNEYCUTT, ENVIRONMENTAL
SPECIALIST NC CHILDHOOD LEAD POISONING PREVENTION
PROGRAM (704) 895-2737 ALAN.HUNEYCUTT_at_NCMAIL.NET
NEASHA M. BRYANT PUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAM
CONSULTANT NC CHILDHOOD LEAD POISONING PREVENTION
PROGRAM (919) 715-0581 NEASHA.BRYANT_at_NCMAIL.NET

3
LEAD-BASED PAINT AND LEAD POISONING
  • Course Limitations
  • It is a program on lead-safe work practices for
    remodeling, renovation, and general
    rehabilitation
  • This course does not qualify individuals to
    conduct lead-based paint abatement, inspections,
    risk assessments, paint testing, soil sampling,
    dust samplings, clearance examinations, or work
    specification development.
  • This course has been approved by HUD.

4
LEAD-BASED PAINT AND LEAD POISONING
  • Learning Objectives
  • Definition of Lead
  • The history of lead use
  • Specific uses of lead and sources of lead
    exposure

5
WHAT IS LEAD?
  • Lead is a heavy, bluish/gray, soft, malleable
    metal
  • Known to be a hazard since ancient times
  • Modern uses included gasoline and paint

6
LEAD-BASED PAINT
  • Lead-based paint is paint or other surface
    coating that contains lead at or above of
    established limits.
  • The Federal standard is 1.0 mg/cm2 or 0.5 by
    weight.

7
LEAD IN PAINT
  • REASONS LEAD WAS ADDED TO PAINT
  • Bright Colors
  • Durability
  • Resistant to corrosion, mold and mildew
  • Lead can also be found in primers, stains,
    varnishes, and shellacs

8
LEAD-BASED PAINT IN HOUSING
  • Approximately 75 of U.S. housing built before
    1978 contains some lead-based paint
  • Homes built before 1960 present a higher risk
  • Approximately 20 million housing units contain
    lead paint hazards 4 million of these units are
    occupied by children

9
LEAD-BASED PAINT HAZARD
  • A lead-based paint hazard is any condition that
    causes exposure to lead from lead-contaminated
    dust, soil or paint that is deteriorated or
    present on accessible, friction, or impact
    surfaces that would result in adverse human
    health effects.

10
CONTROLLING LEAD-BASED PAINT HAZARDS
  • Abatement
  • Interim controls
  • N.C. Preventive Maintenance Program

11
ABATEMENT VS. RENOVATION/REMODELING
  • Depending on the intent of the work, some of the
    same activities could be considered to be either
    lead abatement work or renovation work
  • Lead abatement work requires the use of a
    contractor certified by an EPA - authorized style
    (NC Certification Required (919) 733-0820)
  • Most renovators and remodelers today are not
    trained and certified as abatement contractors,
    but they can be.

12
SIMILARITIES BETWEEN LEAD ABATEMENT WORK AND
RENOVATION ACTIVITIES
  • RENOVATION
  • ACTIVITIES
  • repainting
  • window door repair
  • landscaping
  • installation of new building components
  • paint stripping
  • new wall installation
  • LEAD HAZARD CONTROL
  • paint film stabilization
  • friction impact surface treatment
  • soil treatment
  • building component replacement
  • onsite paint removal
  • enclosure

13
Who can do the work inNorth Carolina
  • Abatements of lead hazards require certified
    people, whereas remodeling or renovation does not.

14
LEAD BASED PAINT
  • CONCERN
  • Lead poisoning is a totally preventable disease
    that still affects nearly 1 million children ages
    6 years and under, according to the most recent
    survey for the Centers for Disease Control

15
LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING
  • WHO IS AT RISK?
  • Women of child bearing age
  • Children under the age of 6
  • Construction, general rehabilitation, painting
    renovation, restoration, and demolition workers
    and their families

16
LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING
  • CHILDREN are most commonly exposed through
    ingestion of lead dust or paint chips.
  • ADULTS are most commonly exposed through
    inhalation of dust and fumes from work
  • Work practices
  • Eating, drinking, or smoking on the job
  • Can be controlled with proper equipment
    training

17
SOURCES OF LEAD EXPOSURE
  • Leaded paint on deteriorated, friction, impact,
    and accessible surfaces
  • Contaminated household dust
  • Contaminated soil

18
SUMMARY
  • LEAD POISONING
  • Is entirely preventable
  • No economic group, geographic area, racial or
    ethnic population is free from risk
  • Controlling lead hazards reduces the risk of
    childhood lead poisoning

19
HEALTH EFFECTS
  • LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • Understand how lead enters, travels and is stored
    in the body
  • Understand the symptoms and health effects of
    lead exposure to children and adults
  • Understand how lead is detected in the body and
    levels of concern for children and construction
    workers

20
PRIMARY PATHWAYS
  • Ingestion (eating)
  • Inhalation (breathing)

21
LEAD IS A TOXIN
  • Lead has no biological value
  • Lead is a poison
  • Lead is found in the blood, soft tissue and bones
  • Symptoms are not readily identifiable
    in most cases
  • Lead exposures are cumulative

22
ACUTE LEAD EXPOSURE CAN CAUSE
  • Brain Damage
  • Seizures
  • Coma
  • Death

23
CHRONIC EXPOSURES CAN
  • Damage the nervous system, blood, kidneys, heart
  • Damage the reproductive system in both men and
    women
  • Contribute to high blood pressure
  • Reduce growth and development in children

24
CHILDHOOD EXPOSURES CAN CAUSE
  • Behavioral and learning disabilities
  • Decreased muscle and bone growth
  • Nervous system and kidney damage
  • Hearing damage
  • Speech and language problems
  • Juvenile delinquency
  • IQ reduction

25
SYMPTOMS OF CHILDHOOD LEAD EXPOSURE
  • Fatigue
  • Stomachache / cramps
  • Irritability
  • Vomiting
  • Constipation
  • Headaches
  • Poor appetite

26
POOR DIET INCREASES LEAD THREAT
  • Deficiency in the diet
  • Iron
  • Zinc
  • Calcium
  • High fat diets

27
LEAD EXPOSURE IN ADULTS CAN CAUSE
  • High blood pressure
  • Digestive problems
  • Nerve disorders
  • Problems with the reproductive system
  • Problems with concentration

28
SYMPTOMS OF LEAD EXPOSURE IN ADULTS
  • Flu-Like Symptoms
  • Headache
  • Poor appetite / anorexia
  • Dizziness / nausea / vomiting
  • Irritability / anxiety / depression
  • Sleeplessness / insomnia
  • Constipation / diarrhea
  • Loss of sex drive

29
IDENTIFYING ELEVATED BLOOD LEAD LEVELS
  • Blood testing
  • Children periodic testing starting at 6-12
    months of age
  • gt20 µg/dl Environmental investigation and
    remediation of identified lead hazards. Clinical
    treatment and monitoring.
  • 10-19 µg/dl Environmental investigation and
    advice on how to remediate identified lead
    hazards. Clinical monitoring, nutritional advice
  • Adults applicable OSHA standards
  • 40 µg/dl Annual testing
  • 50 µg/dl Medical removal until back under 40
    µg/dl

30
SUMMARY
  • Lead is a poison
  • Lead can affect young children, women of
    childbearing age, and adults working in the
    construction industry
  • Signs of lead exposure mimic other illnesses
  • Blood lead screening should be performed on at
    risk populations

31
Laws and Implementing Regulations
  • Learning Objectives
  • Identify governing Federal lead laws and
    regulations
  • Explain the regulations related to renovation and
    remodeling activities
  • Discuss the OSHAs Lead in Construction
    requirements
  • Explain North Carolinas Laws related to Lead
    Based Paint Abatement

32
FEDERAL LAW
  • The Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard
    Reduction Act of 1992 (PL 102-550, October 28,
    1992) known as Title X of the Housing and
    Community Development Act of 1992

33
TITLE X
INTENT AND PURPOSE
  • Develop a national strategy to eliminate
    lead-based paint hazards and to evaluate and
    reduce lead-based paint hazards on a priority
    basis
  • Reduce and prevent childhood lead poisoning
  • Ensure that dealing with lead-based paint hazards
    are integrated into government housing policies

34
TITLE X
  • Amends TSCA by adding Title IV, Section 402(c),
    Renovation and Remodeling
  • Develop renovation / remodeling guidelines
  • Conduct a study of renovation/ remodeling
    activities in target housing (pre-1978)

35
EPA Pre-renovation education rule
  • Those performing renovation or remodeling for
    compensation in pre-1978 housing shall provide
    the lead hazard information pamphlet to the owner
    and occupant prior to conducting such activity.
    Renovation includes most repair, remodeling, and
    maintenance activities that disturb painted
    surfaces.

36
Lead-PRE At-a-Glance
  • Emergency renovation is an unplanned renovation
    activities done in response to a sudden,
    unexpected event which, if not immediately
    attended to, presents a safety or public health
    hazard, or threatens property with significant
    damage.

37
Lead PRE Requirements
  • Distribute a lead pamphlet to the housing owner
    and occupants before renovation starts
  • Obtain confirmation of receipt of lead pamphlets
    from owner and occupants
  • Distribute renovation notices to tenants when
    working in common areas of multi-family housing
  • Retain records for 3 years

38
Educational Pamphlet
  • Copies can be used as long as text and graphics
    are readable
  • Individual copies can be ordered 1(202) 512-1800.
    Individual copies are free, but you are charged
    for multiple copies.
  • www.epa.gov/lead

39
HUD De minimis levels
  • Exterior surfaces 20 square feet
  • This means a total of 20 square feet on all the
    exterior surfaces
  • This includes outbuildings, fences, and play
    equipment attached to the land and belonging to
    the owner
  • Interior surfaces 2 square feet in any one
    interior room
  • This means a total of 2 square feet of
    deteriorated paint on the floors, walls, and
    ceiling in the room.
  • Two square feet is a square about 17 inches on
    each side

40
HUD De minimis levels
  • Component Ten percent (10) of the total surface
    area
  • Examples would be window sills, baseboards, and
    trim.
  • If the deteriorated paint is larger than the
    Deminimis levels, then safe work practices and
    clearance must be performed

41
TITLE X
  • SECTION 1031 WORKER PROTECTION
  • Directed OSHA to develop standards for
    occupational exposures to lead in the
    construction industry
  • 29CFR 1926.62 Lead Exposure in Construction

42
OSHAs REGULATION29 CFR 1926.62 LEAD IN
CONSTRUCTION
  • TYPES OF WORK COVERED BY REGULATION
  • Demolition or salvaging of structures where lead
    or materials contain lead
  • Removal, enclosure or encapsulation of materials
    containing lead
  • New construction, alteration, repair or
    renovation of structures, substrates, or portions
    thereof, that contain lead or materials
    containing lead

43
OSHAs REGULATION29 CFR 1926.62 LEAD IN
CONSTRUCTION
  • TYPES OF WORK COVERED BY REGULATION
  • Installation of products containing lead
  • Contamination/ emergency clean-up
  • Transportation, disposal, storage, or containment
    of lead or materials containing lead on the
    construction site and
  • Maintenance operations associated with the
    previous activities

44
OSHAs REGULATION29 CFR 1926.62 LEAD IN
CONSTRUCTION
  • KEY PROVISIONS - Employer Responsibilities
  • Under 30 mg/m3 - no special action level
  • 30 -50 mg /m3 - requires worker blood lead
    monitoring and training
  • Over 50 mg /m3 permissible exposure limit (pel) -
    requires blood lead monitoring, training, and
    worker protections such as respiratory protection
    and protective work clothing

45
EPA Training and Certification
  • Originally 5 different certifications in the lead
    industry Project Designer, Risk Assessor,
    Inspector, Supervisor, Worker
  • EPA is adding Lead Sampling Technician, North
    Carolina has not yet
  • Regulated by NC Health Hazards Control Branch in
    North Carolina

46
New HUD Regulation Section 1012/1013 of Title X
  • Covers Pre 1978 housing receiving Federal
    assistance and Federally owned housing being sold
  • September 15, 1999 Must use lead-safe work
    practices or interim controls
  • September 15, 2000 Must use lead-safe work
    practices, trained workers, and pass clearance

47
PRELIMINARY DUST OR SOIL SAMPLING (Optional)
  • Sampling must be done by a Certified
  • Lead Risk Assessor
  • Dust sampling - performed in non-work areas
    adjacent to work area
  • Soil sampling - performed prior to exterior work
    on or near bare soil
  • Recommend archiving samples by lab for possible
    later use

48
SUMMARY OF APPLICABLE LAWS AND REGULATIONS
  • Knowledge of and adherence to applicable
    requirements can reduce negative regulatory and
    legal impact to the contractor

49
WORKING LEAD-SAFE
  • LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • Explain importance of lead-based paint training
    for remodelers and renovators
  • Explain the concept of working smart, wet, and
    clean to work safe
  • List materials and equipment needed when working
    in pre-1978 housing
  • Identify lead-related hygiene practices

50
TRAINING
Knowledge of the issues and proper training is
essential to ensuring lead-safe work practices!
51
LEAD-SAFE WORK PRACTICES
  • Keep dust to a minimum
  • Confine dust and paint chips to the work area
  • Clean up during and after work using special
    cleanup procedures
  • Having quality of work confirmed by dust wipe
    samples

52
Interior Set Up
  • Restrict access
  • Protect floor
  • Protect furnishings
  • Stock the work area
  • Set up dust room (optional)

53
Restrict AccessLow Dust Activities
  • Ask occupants to leave the room where work will
    be done and have them stay out until final
    cleanup.
  • Use signs and tape.
  • High dust jobs requires additional precautions.

54
Protect FloorLow-Dust Activities
  • Place protective sheeting on floor extending
    about 5 feet from work area
  • Tape protective sheeting to the baseboard under
    the work area using masking tape (or durable tape
    where masking tape doesnt work)

55
Protect floorLow-Dust Activities
56
Protect FloorLow-Dust Activities
57
Protect FurnishingsLow-Dust Activities
  • Remove drapes, curtains, furniture, and rugs
    within 5 feet of work area
  • Cover any furniture within 5 feet of work area
    that cannot be moved

58
Tracking(Low-Dust Activities)
  • Avoid tracking of dust off the protective
    sheeting
  • Wear non-skid shoe covers and remove them
  • Wipe both top and bottom of shoes with a damp
    paper towel
  • Clean off shoes using a tack pad
  • Remove shoes

59
Set Up a Dust Room(Optional)
  • When working on components that can be moved, you
    may want to work in a room specially prepared to
    contain the dust
  • Makes cleanup easier
  • Protects occupants as well as other workers
  • Useful when working in occupied spaces

60
Exterior Set Up
  • Protect the ground
  • Attach protective sheeting to the wall
  • Build curb
  • Cover windows and doors
  • Use ladder safely

61
Protect the ground
  • Lay protective sheeting 10-feet from work surface
    or as space permits for work on the ground floor
  • Extend the sheeting further out when working on
    the 2nd story or higher
  • Vertical shrouding on scaffolding should be used
    if work is close to a sidewalk, street, or
    another property, or the building is more than
    3-stories high

62
Attach Protective Sheeting to the Wall
  • Protective sheeting can be taped and/or stapled
    to wood siding or ribbon board. A wood strip may
    need to be attached to a masonry wall

63
Build a Curb
  • Build a curb around work perimeter when a
    sidewalk or another property is near, or when
    wind may blow debris off protective sheeting

64
Cover Windows and Doors
  • All windows and doors within 20 feet of the work
    area must be closed. If they cannot be closed,
    seal with protective sheeting during work
  • In an entrance must be used that is closer than
    20 feet, place a shroud above and on the sides of
    the entrance

65
Use Ladder Safely
  • If using protective sheeting to cover the ground,
    cut slots in the sheeting and place the ladder
    feet directly on the ground-not on top of the
    protective sheeting

66
High Dust Jobs
  • Some jobs create large amounts of dust. To be
    safe, workers doing this type of work should
  • Wear N100 respirators
  • Completely isolate the work space from occupied
    spaces and use containment to protect other
    workers
  • Receive lead worker or supervisor training from
    an accredited trainer

67
Examples of High Dust Jobs
  • Demolition
  • Opening up wall cavities
  • Removing old drop ceilings
  • Improperly removing wall-to-wall carpet
  • Scraping large painted areas, even when done
    correctly

68
Containing Dust High Dust Jobs
  • Keep dust from spreading to other rooms
  • Duct tape protective sheeting to perimeter of
    opening. Staple corners.
  • Cut slit in sheeting to within 6 of top and
    bottom.
  • Tape another sheet to top of door. Staple corners

69
Hands On Practice
Set up door containment Set up floor covering
70
HUD PROHIBITED PAINT REMOVAL METHODS
  • Dont use unsafe work methods. Some work methods
    create such high levels of dust that they must
    not be used when working on surfaces that may
    contain lead-based paint.
  • Open flame burning
  • Sanding or blasting without HEPA filter
  • Heat guns over 1,100o F
  • Dry sanding or scraping
  • Certain paint strippers
  • Effective November 15, 1999
  • 24 CFR 35.140

71
Restricted Practices
  • Dont use power sanders or grinders without HEPA
    vacuum attachment
  • Controlled sanding or grinding with HEPA Vacuum
    attachment is acceptable

72
Restricted Practices
  • Dont use open flame or high heat removal of
    paint
  • You can use a heat gun set below 1100 degrees F

73
Restricted Practices
  • Dont use paint strippers containing Methylene
    Chloride Other chemical strippers with
    appropriate precautions are acceptable
  • Dont use uncontained Hydroblasting Contained
    pressure washing is acceptable
  • Dont use uncontrolled abrasive blasting
    Contained blasting is acceptable
  • Avoid extensive dry scraping or sanding Use wet
    methods or limited dry scraping and sanding

74
Minimize the Amount of Dust Created Work Wet
  • Mist work area with water
  • Hand scrape any loose paint, wall paper, and
    plaster
  • Skim and fill holes and cracks with a
    non-shrinking spackle
  • Use wet abrasive sponge or wet-dry sandpaper if
    needed to feather edges

75
Tools for Lead-Safe Work
  • Cleaning equipment
  • Vacuum cleaners
  • Painting supplies
  • Other tools
  • Coil stock
  • Window opening tool
  • Power planer with exhaust port that can be
    attached to HEPA vacuum
  • Paint scrapers
  • Sanding sponges and wet/dry sandpaper
  • Mist bottles
  • Plane (not block)
  • Cleanup station
  • Personal protective clothing and equipment

76
Cleanup Station
77
Cleaning UpPart of the Job
  • Wait at 1 hour prior to cleaning
  • Pick up work area
  • Pick up large chips with a damp paper towel
  • Mist, then push dust into dust pan

78
Cleaning UpPart of the Job
  • Pick up protective sheeting
  • Clean off protective sheeting
  • Fold dirty side inward
  • Dispose of protective sheeting at the end of each
    job
  • Protective sheeting may be reused within the same
    work area if it has not already been folded

79
Cleaning UpPart of the Job
  • Vacuum
  • HEPA vacuum all horizontal surfaces SLOWLY
  • Vacuum all ledges, sills, stools, molding tops,
    dusty surfaces, etc.
  • Vacuum floor under work area

80
HIGH EFFICIENCY PARTICULATE AIR (HEPA) FILTER
  • HEPA vacuum cleaners
  • Dust collection systems for mechanical tools
  • HEPA filters are 99.97 efficient in removing all
    dust particles larger than 0.3 micrometers in
    diameter from exhausted air

81
HEPA VACUUM
Only change the filter in a controlled
environment.
82
Cleaning UpPart of the Job
  • Mist and Scrub
  • Wet rag with detergent, then wring out
  • Mist surface or rag as you clean
  • Lead needs scrubbing, not just wiping
  • Squeeze rags into empty bucket
  • Rinse rag, squeezing over empty bucket
  • Clean until dust and debris are removed

83
Cleaning UpPart of the Job
  • Cleaning floors
  • Mist and scrub
  • Squeeze out and wash
  • Rinse with clean water and new mop head
  • Dispose of waste

Self-Wringing Loop Mop
Rinse Water
Clean Wash Water
Detergent Spray Bottle
84
Cleaning Demonstration
85
Clearance Testing
  • Projects requiring clearance testing must have it
    done by a trained and certified person
  • Failure to pass clearance means you have to fix
    the problems and/or repeat cleaning and clearance
    testing until you comply with the clearance
    standards

86
Visual assessment
  • Must pass visual assessment before clearance
    samples can be taken
  • No deteriorated paint
  • No visible dust, debris and residue
  • No large cracks or gaps
  • Indicates failure of hazard reduction measures

87
Clearance Testing
  • Dust samples are taken on floors, window sill,
    window troughs, and a porch floor if exterior
    work was done
  • The amount of the lead in the dust sample must be
    less than established standards to pass clearance
  • Currently, the floor standard is 40 µg/ft2,
    interior window sill is 250 µg/ft2, and window
    trough is 400 µg/ft2

88
Final CleaningAdvise Your Clients
  • Rugs
  • Send rugs to be cleaned
  • Wear NIOSH-approved mask when rolling up rugs
  • Mist rugs before rolling them up
  • Roll in poly
  • HEPA vac the area under each rug as soon as it is
    removed

89
Final CleaningAdvise Your Clients
  • Wall-to-wall carpets
  • Cannot be well cleaned
  • Vacuum with HEPA filtration and red light/green
    light indicator
  • If replacing, wear at least a NIOSH-approved
    mask, seal room, wrap in poly if carrying through
    the house, clean furniture
  • If wet-cleaning carpets, thoroughly and quickly
    dry

90
Final CleaningAdvise Your Clients
  • Cloth
  • Remove all contaminated cloth and send to be
    cleaned
  • Objects in room
  • Use tack cloth or mild cleaner solution to wipe
    down small objects on shelves, bureaus, window
    stools, etc. and put into boxes
  • Use tack cloths on finished furniture
  • Vacuum upholstered furniture

91
WASTE MANAGEMENT
  • Learning objectives
  • Define the basic principles of waste management
  • List the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
    (RCRA) hazardous waste determination methods
  • Define proper non-hazardous lead waste handling,
    packaging and contamination controls

92
WASTE MANAGEMENT
  • Minimize
  • Contain
  • Control
  • Proper waste management starts with the worker

93
RESOURCE CONSERVATION RECOVERY ACT (RCRA)
  • Provides framework for hazardous and
    non-hazardous waste
  • Most lead based paint debris is solid
  • Local water authorities regulate lead-based paint
    related discharge
  • Water is regulated by the Clean Water Act

94
Water
  • Water from regular clean up should be dumped into
    a toilet. Never dump this water in a sink, tub,
    on the ground, or down a storm drain.
  • Water used to remove paint through pressure
    washing must be collected in drums and may need
    to be tested to determine if it is hazardous.
    Check with the state agency responsible for waste.

95
STATE AND LOCAL REGULATIONS
  • Check with state on waste determination and
    disposal requirements
  • Check with local water authorities on lead based
    paint related water discharges
  • States are authorized by EPA to implement RCRA

96
GENERATOR OF HAZARDOUS WASTES
  • Owner (ultimately responsible for proper waste
    disposal)
  • Contractor (may be designated to manage the waste
    and documentation)
  • Obtain EPA identification number
  • Note that these requirements only apply to larger
    projects not the typical remodeling or
    renovating project.

97
LEAD BASED PAINT RELATED HAZARDOUS WASTE
  • Chemicals (solvents, degreasers, cleaners,
    strippers)
  • Sludge from chemicals
  • Paint chips and dust
  • HEPA vacuum debris, mop heads, rags
  • Other toxicity characteristic leaching procedures
    (TCLP) determined waste (debris, uncleaned poly
    film / disposable clothing)

98
LEAD WASTE MANAGEMENT AND CONTAMINATION CONTROLS
  • Large debris -- wrap 6 mil poly film and seal
    with duct tape
  • Small debris -- place in 6 mil poly bag and
    gooseneck seal with duct tape
  • Change HEPA vacuum bags / filters in controlled
    areas

99
LEAD WASTE MANAGEMENT AND CONTAMINATION CONTROLS
  • Do not leave waste in dwelling unit or on the job
  • Do not mix hazardous waste with non-hazardous
    waste
  • Bag and seal or decontaminate tools
  • Do not handle packaged items roughly

100
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)
  • Respiratory equipment N-100 Respirator masks may
    be sufficient and will provide good protection.
  • Protective clothing Booties at least should be
    worn to keep from tracking lead dust throughout
    site
  • Other protective equipment Earplugs, eye
    goggles, face shields, etc.

101
Worker Protection
  • Safety goggles or glasses
  • Remove dusty clothes at end of job
  • Wear disposable protective clothing or keep
    clothes clean
  • Wear hat to protect head
  • Respiratory protection when applicable
  • Post warning signs
  • Wash hands and face each time you stop working

102
Personal Protection Equipment
Most renovation remodeling jobs will not
require this degree of protection. Many
abatement jobs will, however, which is why
additional training and certification of lead
abatement workers is required.
103
WORKER HYGIENE PRACTICES
  • Wash hands and face before eating, drinking,
    smoking, applying cosmetics
  • Keep clean change areas/eating areas free of lead
    contamination
  • Contaminated work cloths / boots must remain at
    the work site or be decontaminated

104
WORKER HYGIENE PRACTICES
  • Handle/store/dispose contaminated clothing and
    materials properly
  • Dry decontamination with HEPA vac before removing
    work clothes
  • If feasible, completely shower before leaving
    work site. You can contaminate your car and home
    and poison your children.

105
WORKER HYGIENE PRACTICES
  • If showering is not feasible, wash hands/face
    before leaving shower completely at home
  • Do not wash contaminated clothing with the rest
    of the family laundry. Dont take home lead dust
    to your own home or automobile.
  • No eating, drinking, smoking or applying
    cosmetics in lead work areas
  • Park cars away from possible sources of
    contamination

106
WORKER HYGIENE PRACTICES
  • Clean / disinfect respirators daily following
    manufacturers instructions
  • Clean tools / equipment prior to removal from
    work area
  • Dont use personal vehicles to transport debris
    without precautions
  • Properly control putting on and taking off
    personal protective equipment

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DRY DECONTAMINATION
  • Removing work clothes
  • Use HEPA vacuum
  • Start at head, end at feet
  • Do not use compressed air to blow off dust
  • Roll protective clothing dirty side in
  • Remove protective clothing such as gloves and
    shoes before leaving the work area

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QUALITY CONTROL CHECKS
  • Work that fails to follow proper quality control
    and cleanup procedures may spread contaminated
    dust and paint chips beyond the work area
  • Have a visual inspection and dust testing
    performed after final clean up and waste
    disposal.

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A WORD TO THE WISEIF THE DWELLING IS OLDER
THAN 1978, ASSUME THE PRESENCE OF LEAD UNTIL
PROVEN OTHERWISE
SUMMARY

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INTERIM CONTROL METHODSNC Preventive Maintenance
Program
  • Paint and substrate stabilization
  • Specialized cleaning including dust removal (hard
    and soft surfaces)
  • Friction and impact surface treatment
  • Accessible surface treatments
  • Contaminated bare soil treatments
  • On-going dust level monitoring- annual testing to
    make sure dust levels are below the hazard levels

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North Carolina Preventive Maintenance Program
  • In 1997, the North Carolina General Assembly
    adopted the Childhood Lead Exposure Control Act
    establishing a new lead-based paint Preventive
    Maintenance Program. The PMP is designed to
    reduce childhood lead exposure in older rental
    housing. Participation in the program is
    voluntary and owners of residential rental
    property built before 1978 are eligible and
    encouraged to participate.

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Why Should I Participate?
  • Limited liability relief from potential lead
    poisoning litigation
  • Market your property as having a state issued
    Certificate of Compliance
  • Protect children from exposure to lead-based
    paint hazards.

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How Do I Participate?
  • Bring the pre-1978 rental property up to a
    certain physical standard in the interior
  • Bring the pre-1950 rental property up to a
    certain physical standard in the exterior
  • Provide occupants with educational materials (EPA
    Protect Your Family From Lead in Your Home) and
    lead inspection results
  • Encourage property maintenance staff to attend
    lead-safe maintenance class
  • Have property inspected annually
  • Fill out application and submit 10.00 annually
    to NC Department of Environment and Natural
    Resources

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Interior Condition
  • USING LEAD-SAFE WORK PRACTICES
  • Repair and repaint areas of deteriorated paint
    and correct the cause of deterioration
  • Adjust doors and windows to minimize friction and
    impact that may create lead dust
  • Use specialized cleaning methods inside the unit
    to remove lead dust
  • Make interior surfaces smooth and easy to clean

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Smooth and Easy to Clean Interior Surfaces
  • Floors-
  • Recoat deteriorated hardwood floors
  • Replace or recover worn-out linoleum
  • Windows
  • Repair and repaint inside window sills
  • Cap window troughs with vinyl or aluminum

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Exterior Condition
  • USING LEAD-SAFE WORK PRACTICES
  • Repair and repaint deteriorated surfaces and
    correct the cause of deterioration
  • Cover areas of bare soil within three feet of the
    building foundation with grass or mulch

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Certificate of Compliance
  • Property owner submit an application along with
    the following each year
  • Signed statement(s) from occupants saying they
    received information about lead paint hazards
  • Written report by a certified lead inspector or
    risk assessor
  • Laboratory analyses of lead dust samples
  • 10.00

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Resident Responsibilities
  • Wiping clean all windowsills with a damp cloth or
    sponge at least weekly
  • Regularly washing all surfaces accessible to
    children
  • Notifying the owner or managing agent of
    deteriorated paint in the unit within 72 hours
    and
  • Teaching children to prevent lead ingestion, for
    example, by encouraging hand and face washing.

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Residents Weekly Cleaning
  • Window troughs
  • Use damp paper towels to pick up visible dirt
  • Damp clean with cleaning cloths do not use
    these cloths on other surfaces
  • Thoroughly clean stools and around baseboards
  • Clean up peeling or flaking paint and call
    managing agent
  • Damp mop all rooms changing mop head every few
    months
  • Keep all surfaces smooth and cleanable

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  • REMEMBER
  • This program will let us stop using children as
    lead detectors and will prevent children from
    getting lead-poisoned in the first place.

North Carolina Childhood Lead Poisoning
Prevention Program
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