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Corporate and Foundation Fundraising Strategies

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Title: Corporate and Foundation Fundraising Strategies


1
Corporate and Foundation Fundraising Strategies
  • Jeanne Argoff, Ph.D.
  • PMRO-CESSI
  • Ticket Partners Summit
  • Louisville, KY
  • March 12, 2008

2
FOUNDATION FUNDINGOverview
  • About Foundations
  • Types of Foundations
  • What Foundations Fund
  • ENs and Foundation Funding
  • Foundation vs. Government Funding
  • How to Be a Successful Grantseeker
  • Researching Foundations

3
About Foundations

4
What Are Foundations?
  • Grantmaking foundations support specific causes
    and programs
  • Most have endowments
  • 2006 statistics
  • over 72,000 foundations
  • Over 600 billion in assets
  • Over 40 billion in grants
  • Vary enormously in assets and staff
  • Essential to know the type of foundation, the
    issues it supports, and typical grant size.

5
Types of Foundations
  • Community foundations
  • serve a specific geographic area
  • raise money from donors
  • donor advised funds
  • fund broadly
  • Public foundations
  • like community foundations, actively raise money
    from donors
  • small category of grantmakers

6
Types of Foundations (contd)
  • Family foundations
  • from family wealth
  • family members usually control the Board of
    Directors
  • topics funded often reflect personal interests of
    family members
  • Private or independent foundations
  • often evolve from family foundations
  • generally do not raise money from donors.

7
Types of Foundations (contd)
  • Corporate foundations and giving programs
  • philanthropy an extension of corporation
  • programs must match corporate interests
  • corporate giving programs
  • run by corporation directly.
  • funded with a percentage of company profits
  • corporate foundations
  • usually have more stable programs

8
Types of Foundations (contd)
  • Operating foundations
  • private foundations that use their resources to
    fund charitable programs of their own
  • very few make grants to outside organizations

9
Types of Foundations (contd)
  • 88.8 percent of all foundations are independent
    or family
  • 3.8 percent corporate
  • 1.1 percent community
  • All but most operating foundations are targets
    for support

10
What Foundations Fund

11
Distribution of Grants for Special Population
Groups
  • Dollar Value Number of Grants
  • Group 2004 2005 2004
    2005
  • Aging 1.6 1.7 2.3
    2.3
  • Children Youth 20.6 18.1 22.8
    22.9
  • Economically Disadvantaged 20.3 15.7
    19.1 19.6
  • Ethnic or Racial Minorities 7.6 8.2
    10.6 10.3
  • Gays or Lesbians 0.2 0.2 0.5
    0.4
  • Immigrants Refugees 0.9 1.0
    1.4 1.5
  • People with Disabilities 2.9 3.1
    5.0 5.2
  • Women and Girls 5.2 6.4 6.5
    6.5

12
Foundation Funding by Subject Area, 2005 Overall
Funding
Topic Area of Dollars Amount Education
24.0 3.9 billion Health 20.8 3.4 Human
Services 14.8 2.4 Arts and Culture
12.5 2.1 Public Affairs/Society Benefit
11.2 1.8 Environment Animals
6.3 1.0 International Affairs 3.6 591
million Science and Technology 3.1 508
million Religion 2.5 409 million Social
Sciences 1.2 201 million Other 0.1
11 million Total 100.0 16.4 billion   Source
Foundation Giving Trends, The Foundation Center,
2007. Figures represent approximately half of all
US foundation giving
13
Disability Funding by Subject Area
Topic Area Percent Dollars Education
13.4 74,634,057 Health 51.3
284,822,505 Human Services 31.2
173,456,296 Arts and Culture 1.2
6,801,661 Public Affairs/Society Benefit
0.5 2,896,994 Environment Animals
0.2 1,292,870 International
Affairs 0.3 1,728,648 Science
0.8 4,709,879 Religion 0.2
989,443 Social Sciences 0.1
464,600 Other 0.8
3,600,355 Total 100.0
555,397,308   Source Grants for People with
Disabilities, The Foundation Center, 2008,
covering grants given in 2005 and 2006. Note
figures vary from Foundation Giving Trends
because of different foundation samples and time
periods.
14
Different Patterns of Disability Funding Compared
to Overall Funding Patterns
  • Overall Funding
  • Education 24.0
  • Health 20.8
  • Human Services 14.8
  • Arts and Culture 12.5
  • Public Affairs/Society Benefit 11.2
  • Environment Animals 6.3
  • International Affairs 3.6
  • Science 3.1
  • Religion 2.5
  • Social Sciences 1.2
  • Other 0.1
  • Total 100.0
  • Source Foundation Giving Trends, The Foundation
    Center, 2006
  • Disability Funding
  • Education 13.4
  • Health 51.3
  • Human Services 31.2
  • Arts and Culture 1.2
  • Public Affairs/Society Benefit 0.5
  • Environment Animals 0.2
  • International Affairs 0.3
  • Science 0.8
  • Religion 0.2
  • Social Sciences 0.1
  • Other 0.8
  • Total 100.0
  • Source Grants for People with Disabilities, The
    Foundation Center, 2008

15
Disability FundingHuman Services Subcategories
  • Dollar Amount
  • Crime, courts legal services 1.1 6.3
    million
  • Employment 3.2 17.7
  • Food, nutrition agriculture 0.8 4.5
  • Housing shelter 2.8 15.8
  • Recreation sports 2.8 15.4
  • Safety disaster relief 0.2 0.9
  • Youth development 0.3 1.8
  • Human services-multipurpose
    20.0 111.0
  • Of total disability funding
  • Source Grants for People with Disabilities, The
    Foundation Center, 2008

16
Disability Funding Trends
  • Dollar Value of Grants
  • 2004 2005
  • 452,661,000 2.9 509,165,000
    3.1
  • Number of Grants
  • 2004 2005
  • 6,360 5.0 6,868 5.2
  • Source Foundation Giving Trends, 2006 and 2007

17
Disability Giving by Size of Foundation
  • The 100 largest foundations gave a smaller
    percentage to disability than smaller grantmakers
  • Largest funders gave 2.3 of dollars and 4.2 of
    their grants to people with disabilities
  • Smaller funders in Foundation Center database
    gave more 4.1 of dollars and 5.7 of grants
  • Source Foundation Giving Trends, The Foundation
    Center, 2008

18
Disability Giving by Foundation Type
  • Community foundations give more to disability
    issues than other types 4.3 of dollars and 5.5
    of grants
  • Independent foundations gave 3.1 of dollars and
    5.5 of grants
  • Corporate foundations gave 2.3 of dollars and
    4.6 of grants

19
Disability Giving by Region
  • Region Dollar Amount () Number of Grants
    ()
  • Northeast 3.6 5.1
  • Midwest 2.8 4.8
  • South 3.7 6.2
  • West 2.4 5.2
  • Source Foundation Giving Trends, The Foundation
    Center, 2008
  • covering grants made in 2006.

20
Summary of Foundation Funding of Interest to ENs
(2004/5 figures)
  • Employment programs (including those to
    nondisabled)
  • Fall under human services (5 of general human
    services grants 114.3 million)
  • Less than one percent of all grants recorded in
    Foundation Center (FC) system.
  • Disability programs
  • Between 3-5 of foundation grants
  • over 50 of that to health, research and mental
    health
  • Employment 3.2 of disability grants in FC
    system (17.7 million)

21
ENs and Foundation Funding
  • Employment Networks (ENs) elements that appeal
    to foundations
  • Meeting Real Needs
  • Visibility
  • Small Investment, Big Return
  • Sustainability
  • Systems Change
  • Mentioning these value added factors
    strengthens your submission

22
ENs and Foundation Funding, cont.
  • Family, community, and corporate foundations are
    particularly interested in programs that improve
    the lives of individuals within their communities
  • Many corporate foundations especially interested
    in employment issues
  • Family and community foundations may have
    particular funds set aside for people with
    disabilities

23
Foundation vs. Government Funding

24
Differences Between Foundation and Government
Funding Processes
  • Difference between fairness and stewardship
  • Both fund best programs to serve the public good
  • But foundations may fund well-known programs to
    get an excellent product

25
Government Fairness
  • Government process emphasizes fairness
  • written request for proposals (RFP)
  • detailed, published review criteria
  • outside objective reviewers
  • designated government staff members assigned to
    answer questions during the proposal process.

26
Foundations Stewardship
  • Foundation world stresses stewardship
  • often favors excellent programs already known to
    the foundation
  • can make use of information that is not in the
    grant application
  • may not have specific RFP or guidelines
  • review and selection processes not open to public
  • review criteria often not explicit

27
How To Be A Successful Grantseeker

28
Successful Foundation Grantseeking
  • Each foundation is unique
  • Target each proposal to one specific foundation
  • be responsive to all foundation instructions
  • One size fits all approach doesnt work

29
Number 1 Think relationships
  • Staff and trustees tend to support programs they
    know and respect
  • Essential to work directly with the staff to the
    extent possible
  • Enhance relationships by providing stream of
    informationbut dont overload
  • Put foundation staff on mailing list

30
Number 2 Become an Insider
  • Be publicly successful
  • People must know about your agencys success and
    tell others about it
  • Requires systematic communication
  • Communicate your successes as part of an overall
    strategy

31
Number 3 Do Your Homework
  • Prevents wasting your own and foundations time
  • A misplaced application creates a bad impression
  • Homework tells you
  • what the foundation funds
  • criteria for selection
  • process it uses to fund projects

32
Do Your Homework (contd)
  • Cardinal rule Never send identical proposals to
    all prospects
  • Always tailor programs to foundations specific
    needs and requirements
  • Sources for foundations information
  • Foundation Center and other libraries
  • Online collections and databases
  • Foundation websites
  • Annual reports and other written information

33
Do Your Homework, cont.
  • Stages in researching foundations
  • Stage One Create initial list of prospective
    funders
  • Stage Two Collect and organize prospect
    information
  • Stage Three Refine list and conduct in-depth
    research on most likely sources

34
Number 4 Look Locally First
  • Only one out of eight foundations gives
    nationally
  • Over 60 of foundation funding come from local
    foundations
  • Identify corporations with headquarters or major
    operations in your area
  • Your board members and advisors can help with
    local funders
  • A local grant makes national foundation support
    more likely

35
Number 5 Understand the Funders Needs
  • Foundations have needs, too
  • Reflected in mission statements and funding
    criteria
  • Look at mission statement in light of recent
    grants made
  • Grants show current emphasis and priorities

36
Number 6 Simplify and Clarify Your Messages
  • State the major elements of what you propose to
    do in less than three minutes
  • Write out talking points and practice your speech
    with others
  • Prepare answers to the logical second tier
    questions

37
Number 7 Talk Before Writing
  • Call and talk to a program officer
  • Secretary/ receptionist might be empowered to
    answer questions
  • Try to get beyond him/her
  • Ask if there are community information meetings
  • Foundation staff might ask for a written
    version-concept paper (2 pages max)

38
Talk Before Writing (contd)
  • Talking to a Program Officer
  • Briefly describe your project
  • Ask if idea fits foundations priorities
  • If not, are there some aspects of the work that
    might fit your guidelines
  • Explore ways of strengthening your concept
  • Never mistake a program officers enthusiasm as a
    promise of funding
  • Talk first, but listen carefully
  • Give them a chance to give their feedback
  • Especially because foundation priorities can
    change
  • With new leadership
  • Because of board decisions
  • Economic climate

39
Number 8 Write the Proposal
  • Modify each proposal for each foundation
  • Once specific sections modified, lots of material
    can be used repeatedly
  • Provide information exactly as requested
  • Make sure that methodology is sound
  • Most important question to answer how will this
    program make life better for people with
    disabilities?

40
Write the Proposal (cont'd)
  • Answer the three What questions
  • Do What?
  • concise and clear statement of what proposal will
    accomplish
  • So What?
  • what difference would it make for population?
  • Then What?
  • how will program be continued?
  • evaluation and dissemination of results

41
Proposal Elements
  • Executive Summary
  • Introduction
  • Needs Statement/Problem Statement
  • Project Description
  • Budget and Budget Narrative
  • Conclusion
  • Attachments

42
Write the Proposal Style and Packaging
  • Use active rather than passive voice
  • Dont use jargon, and define insider terms
  • Use simple sentences and short paragraphs
  • Provide concrete examples
  • Use headings, subheads and bullets for clarity
  • Include a Table of Contents if proposal is over
    10 pages

43
Applying On-Line
  • Trend for the future?
  • Advantages
  • Forms are brief
  • Easy to fill out
  • Save on paper, postage and delivery charges
  • Can be submitted at last minute
  • Disadvantages
  • Space restrictions
  • Can restrict your ability to make your case
  • No room for a personal relationship with the
    grantmaker
  • Restricts ability to supply powerful marketing
    materials

44
Number 9 Dont Give Up!
  • Keep trying to make personal contact
  • In some cases, direct communication is difficult
  • Key is to be politely persistent
  • Never harass or get angry at foundation personnel
  • No, just means theres not a match
  • Go on to your next prospect
  • Remember your goals and your mission!

45
Researching Foundations
  • 65 to 80 of proposals disqualified because they
    dont match funders interests
  • Good research is essential
  • Wealth of sources readily available
  • Libraries
  • Foundation Center collection
  • Public libraries
  • University libraries
  • Online research

46
Online Research
  • Learning how to use the Web efficiently is
    crucial
  • Internet guides help structure research using
  • searchable databases
  • grantmaker websites
  • online journals and periodicals
  • discussion groups
  • electronic mailing lists
  • The Foundation Centers Guide to Grantseeking on
    the Web

47
Online Directories/Databases
  • Offer a variety of levels of access to
    information on funders and grants
  • The Foundation Centerwww.foundationcenter.org
  • GrantStationwww.grantstation.com
  • Foundation Searchwww.foundationsearch.com
  • Others

48
Websites of Philanthropy Associations
  • Disability Funders Network
  • Disability Funding in California
  • Ticket to Work Forums for Grantmakers
  • The Ticket to Work and Work Incentives
    Improvement Act Opportunities for Shape
    Innovation Through Public Private Partnerships
  • California State Activities Relating to Work
    Incentive Act Implementation
  • Regional Associations of Grantmakers (RAGs)
  • Donors Forum of Chicago

49
General Information Websites
  • David Lambs Prospect Research Page
  • http//www.lambresearch.com
  • FundsNet
  • http//www.fundsnetservices.com
  • HandsNet
  • http//www.handsnet.org

50
Instructional Websites and Pages
  • Grant Proposal.com
  • http//www.grantproposal.com
  • The Grantsmanship Center
  • http//www.tgci.com
  • The Foundation Center http//foundationcenter.org/
    gainknowledge/

51
Disability Funders Network/EN Cap Grantseeking
Guide
  • Download from www.disabilityfunders.org or
    http//www.yourtickettowork.com/en_cap_resource
    (Chapter 4)
  • In depth information on researching and writing
    proposals for disability grantseekers.
  • Letters of Inquiry
  • Letter Proposals
  • Full Proposals
  • On-line Applications
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