TEACHING OF ENGLISH TO YOUNG LEARNERS IN SOUTH AFRICAN SCHOOLS: SUBJECT AND POLICY IMPLEMENTATION PR - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – TEACHING OF ENGLISH TO YOUNG LEARNERS IN SOUTH AFRICAN SCHOOLS: SUBJECT AND POLICY IMPLEMENTATION PR PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: a8991-YzA4N



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

TEACHING OF ENGLISH TO YOUNG LEARNERS IN SOUTH AFRICAN SCHOOLS: SUBJECT AND POLICY IMPLEMENTATION PR

Description:

... by communities in South Africa, including languages used for religious purposes, ... they be trained over school holidays? will unions allow it without ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:196
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 56
Provided by: Offi190
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: TEACHING OF ENGLISH TO YOUNG LEARNERS IN SOUTH AFRICAN SCHOOLS: SUBJECT AND POLICY IMPLEMENTATION PR


1
TEACHING OF ENGLISH TO YOUNG LEARNERS IN SOUTH
AFRICAN SCHOOLS SUBJECT AND POLICY
IMPLEMENTATIONPRESENTED BY BOITUMELO
KGWADIPROVINCIAL LANGUAGES CO-ORDINATORGAUTENG
PROVINCE SOUTH AFRICA3-6 JAN 2008BANGALORE
Iatefl CONFERENCE
2
INTRODUCTION / BACKGROUND
  • The constitution of the Republic of South Africa
    forms the basis for social transformation in our
    post apartheid society. The imperative to
    transform South African society by making use of
    various transformative tools stems from a need to
    address the legacy of apartheid in all areas of
    human activity and education in particular.
  • Social transformation in education is aimed at
    ensuring that the educational imbalances of the
    past are redressed and that equal educational
    opportunities are provided for all sections of
    our population. If social transformation is to be
    achieved, all South Africans have to be
    educationally affirmed through the recognition of
    their potential and the removal of artificial
    barriers to the attainment of quality education.

3
BACKGROUND CONT
  • Transformation and development aims to heal the
    divisions of the past and establish society based
    on democratic values, social justice and
    fundamental human rights. Languages as a subject
    in schools, is faced with even a bigger challenge
    to impact and improve the lives of young South
    African citizens, to further improve the quality
    of life and free potential of each person.
  • It is not only Language as a subject that is
    faced with challenges, also the teachers and
    learners are involved in building a united
    democratic South Africa that is able to take its
    rightful place as a sovereign state in the family
    of nations.

4
BACKGROUND CONT
  • South Africa as a country has a constitution that
    intends to address the past imbalances, to
    redress these imbalances, to provide equal access
    to resources of the country and to bring equity
    to and for all individuals, especially the
    previously disadvantaged communities or
    individuals.
  • This is the constitution that binds all the
    citizens of South Africa and those who live in
    it. All policies of different Departments are
    enshrined within this constitution. There is no
    policy that can be formulated outside the
    framework of the constitution, should that
    happen, it is gross negligence and is punishable
    by law.

5
BACKGROUND CONT
  • South Africa comes from the apartheid era that
    created and promoted racial discrimination,
    tensions, contradictions and hatred amongst South
    African individuals across different colour
    lines, thus, a number of these discriminatory
    policies have affected either the access of the
    learners to the education system or their success
    within it.The inherited language-in-education
    policy in South Africa has been clouded with
    uncertainties and sensitivities, and underpinned
    by racial and linguistic discrimination.
  • Therefore, the new language in education policy
    is conceived of as an integral and necessary
    aspect of the new governments strategy of
    building a non-racial nation in South Africa. It
    is meant to facilitate communication across the
    barriers of colour, language and religion, while
    at the same time creating an environment in which
    respect for languages other than ones own would
    be encouraged.

6
BACKGROUND CONT
  • This approach is in line with the fact that both
    societal and individual multilingualism are the
    global norm today, especially on the African
    continent. As such, it assumes that the learning
    of more than one language should be general
    practice and principle in our society as a
    country. This means that, being multilingual
    should be a defining characteristic of being
    South African. It is constructed also to counter
    any particularistic ethnic chauvinism or
    separatism through mutual understanding (LiEP
    1997)
  • The constitution and Language in Education policy
    states it clearly that all languages are equal
    and there is no language that supersedes the
    other. We need to put systems in place where
    fears of the people are going to be allayed,
    where we are going to provide clarity on issues
    pertaining to this process.

7
BACKGROUND CONT
  • This is a challenge which we need to take in
    stride and make sure that it bears fruit. This
    issue is still under vigorous and intense
    discussion, but in the meantime we are guided by
    what the policy says (LiEP 1997).
  • Education Department is one of the number of
    departments in South African Government it has
    its own Policies and Acts. These policies are
    drafted within the framework of the constitution
    of South Africa. Amongst the policies that the
    Education Department has is the South African
    School Act (SASA), National Education Policy Act
    (NEPA), Education White Paper 6 on Inclusion, and
    Language in Education Policy (LiEP 1997) with its
    norms and standards.
  • The aim of these norms and standards is the
    development of the state's overarching language
    goals in school education in compliance with the
    Constitution. The LiEP also recognises that
    diversity is a valuable asset, which the state is
    required to respect.

8
BACKGROUND CONT
  • The aim of this policy is also
  • Protection, promotion, fulfilment and extension
    of the individual's language rights and means of
    communication in education and
  • The facilitation of national and international
    communication through promotion of bi- or
    multilingualism through cost-efficient and
    effective mechanisms,
  • To redress the neglect of the historically
    disadvantaged languages in school education.
    (LiEP 1997)
  • All policies, with their norms and standards
    comply with the intentions of the constitution
    which also, In terms of the new Constitution of
    the Republic of South Africa and thus the
    Department of Education, recognises that our
    cultural diversity is a valuable national asset
    and hence is tasked to promote equity and
    equality and redress the past imbalances.

9
BACKGROUND CONT
  • Amongst other things, the LiEP promotes respect
    for all languages used in the country, including
    South African Sign Language and the languages
    referred to in the South African Constitution.
    (LiEP 1997 )

10
BACKGROUND CONT
  • The main aims of the Ministry of Educations
    policy for language in education are
  • To promote full participation in society and the
    economy through equitable and meaningful access
    to education
  • To pursue the language policy most supportive of
    general conceptual growth amongst learners, and
    hence to establish additive multilingualism as an
    approach to language in education
  • To promote and develop all the official
    languages
  • To support the teaching and learning of all other
    languages required by learners or used by
    communities in South Africa, including languages
    used for religious purposes, languages which are
    important for international trade and
    communication, and South African Sign Language,
    as well as Alternative and Augmentative
    Communication

11
BACKGROUND CONT
  • To counter disadvantages resulting from different
    kinds of mismatches between home languages and
    languages of learning and teaching
  • To develop programmes for the redress of
    previously disadvantaged languages. (LiEP 1997)

12
BACKGROUND CONT
  • South Africa has nine Provinces viz

13
BACKGROUND CONT
  • All these Provinces have different dynamics a far
    as their education systems are concerned,
    specifically in terms of language(s). Different
    provinces have dominant languages.
  • KZN is dominantly isiZulu
  • Limpopo is dominantly Sepedi and Tshivenda,
  • Eastern Cape is dominantly IsiXhosa.
  • Western Cape is dominantly Afrikaans
  • North West is dominantly Setswana.
  • Free state is dominantly Sesotho
  • Northern Cape is dominantly Afrikaans
  • The most complicated province is Gauteng with a
    conglomeration of languages. There is no specific
    language spoken in Gauteng province, however,
    there are those dominating languages in terms of
    numbers viz isiZulu, Sepedi and IsiXhosa.

14
BACKGROUND CONT
  • All these provinces have their own Provincial
    Education Offices which are all answerable to the
    National Department of Education Office in
    Pretoria.
  • Much as there are all these provinces, they are
    all governed by the policies as drafted by the
    National Education Department and endorsed by
    Government.
  • All they (Provinces) can do is to formulate their
    own provincial policies or customise these
    policies to suit their provincial situations /
    needs, but still, within the framework of the
    National Policy.

15
Teaching of English (as language and Subject /
Learning Area) in schools in South Africa
  • POLICY AND PRACTICE ACROSS VARIED CONTEXTS
  • According to Policy all language subjects shall
    receive equitable time and resource allocation.

16
Teaching of English cont
  • In South African schools there is English as a
    language of teaching and Learning (Lolt) and also
    English as a learning area (subject). There is
    so much controversy around English as a Lolt.
    Some parents want their children to start school
    in English from Grade 1 and be well reinforced in
    the language but some believe that learning first
    in the Home Language at grades1 and 2 will
    reinforce English that will be introduced later
    on in higher grades better. (Grades 3-4).
  • Schools have governing bodies (SGBs). These
    are parents representative bodies which are
    chosen by the majority of parents of a particular
    school, in a well constituted meeting. They
    represent all the decisions made, taken and
    agreed upon by the school. They are the governors
    of the school and have duties as stipulated by
    South African Schools Act.

17
Teaching of English cont
  • Amongst others, one of their duties is to
  • Determine the Language of teaching and learning
    (Lolt) of a particular school.
  • Subject to any law dealing with language in
    education and the Constitutional rights of
    learners in determining the language policy of
    the school, the governing body must stipulate how
    the school will promote multilingualism through
    using more than one language of learning and
    teaching, and/or by offering additional languages
    as fully-fledged subjects, and/or applying
    special immersion or language maintenance
    programmes education department through other
    means approved by the head of the provincial
    department.
  • There is a strong belief in most parents in the
    Black South African community that if their
    children start school and learn in English, they
    will be better people in the trade and technical
    world thus the governing bodies of most black
    schools choose English as the Lolt of the school.

18
Teaching of English cont
  • There is a difference between Home language and
    Mother tongue. There are black children who
    attend former model C schools (Town Schools)
    whom, in their schools there is no language that
    they are born with (mother tongue) being taught
    at the school. Policy stipulates that a learner
    has to do two languages, one at the Home language
    level and one at the first additional language
    level.
  • In these former model C schools, in most cases,
    the languages taught are English and Afrikaans
    which are neither at the home or first additional
    levels of the black children in those schools,
    however they (black learners) find themselves
    doing English at Home

19
Teaching of English cont
  • Language level and Afrikaans at first additional
    level, therefore Home language does not
    necessarily mean that it is the mother tongue of
    that learner.
  • Mother tongue is the language that an individual
    is born with and can, if available at a school,
    be taught at Home language level and another
    language taught at First additional level. This
    happens better in situations where there is an
    indigenous languages) (black languages including
    Afrikaans) taught at these former models C
    schools or alternatively in the township schools
    where there is dominance of the indigenous
    languages and speakers thereof

20
Teaching of English cont
  • In townships schools (black schools), there is
    dominance of indigenous languages and also
    dominance of the speakers of these languages.
    This implies that, these teachers are not the
    speakers of English at a Home Language level
    however, since parents (SGB) choose English as
    the language of teaching and learning (Lolt),
    they have to conform to teaching in English.

21
CHALLENGES FACING THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH TO
YOUNG LEARNERS
  • Given this background, the challenge here is
  • a) Lolt is English
  • b) Teachers who are not natural English speakers
    and are not proficient in this language
  • The implication of the above statement is that
    learners will be taught different subjects
    (learning Areas) in English including English
    as a subject / learning area by the non speakers
    of the language, who may also be not proficient
    in English.
  • There are challenges both in the classroom and on
    the entire system

22
CHALLENGES CONT
23
CHALLENGES CONT
  • These are some of the challenges facing some of
    the South African schools and this means that the
    teaching and learning of the subjects (learning
    Areas) and English as a subject will always lack
    as long as these problems still exist.
  • In former model C schools (town / white schools )
    the learners learn English and other subjects
    much better because they are taught by the first
    language speakers, who do not have to first think
    in the mother tongue then translate to English to
    put the message across.

24
CHALLENGES CONT
  • ON THE SYSTEM
  • Lack of resources (both human and material)
    books, libraries, technology
  • Access to the school
  • Training of teachers and formal education
    (qualifications), skills
  • Systemic problems. Illiteracy, poverty, jobs,
  • Teacher remunerations, unions and strikes, job
    satisfaction
  • Parental involvement t and perception of the
    school
  • HIV and AIDS
  • Class size (the Primary school class ratio is
    140 )

25
CHALLENGES CONT
  • Issues and policies are discussed and argued
    about in different forums however what comes out
    of the discussions is very different from what is
    happening in reality. One of the issues is that
    there is no terminology and resources to teach in
    different indigenous home languages.
  • The argument from some of the discussions is that
    there will ALWAYS be terminology. Much as English
    wants to supersede other languages, some of the
    English words used in some books are not English
    but borrowed words, so whats the fuss?

26
CHALLENGES CONT
  • Now, the reality of the country is that Language
    is for communication, but if there are eleven
    official languages, like it is the case in South
    Africa, and everyone else has been taught in
    their home language / mother tongue, how is the
    level of communication going to be at the point
    of convergence i.e. in the field of work? Who
    will understand what is being said? Language
    components cannot be used in isolation it should
    always be in context. Nouns are related to verbs,
    adverbs, concords etc. there is no way one can
    hear or understand only a noun and conclude that
    the whole meaning of the sentence is understood.

27
CHALLENGES CONT
  • e.g
  • 1. tlisa cup oe pele o e thuba. (Setswana)
  • 2. please pass me that cup (English)
  • 3. bonang cup ya gona e botse byang (Sepedi)
  • 4. hy het die cup gebreek (Afrikans)
  • 5. sana, o ndiphathele e cup neh. (IsiXhosa)
  • We can all hear the word cup, but is the
    meaning of all these sentences the same?
  • Sentence 1 means bring that cup here before you
    break it. (A command)
  • Sentence 2 means please pass me the cup
  • Sentence 3 means look how beautiful that cup is
  • Sentence 4 means that he has broken the cup
  • Sentence 5 is asking a friend or a loved one for
    the cup as a memento or present, can be from the
    shop or another country etc.

28
CHALLENGES CONT
  • The point is, language should be learnt in
    context and not in isolated or fragmented
    concepts or structures
  • This is a Gauteng Province scenario i.e. one of
    the nine provinces, where there is a
    conglomeration of languages

29
CHALLENGES CONT
  • Another context
  • South Africa has nine Provinces where some are
    more rural than others or where rural areas are
    still undeveloped and technology is still far
    from reaching them.
  • There is no electricity
  • no running water,
  • no sanitation etc
  • It is beyond ones imagination what type of
    education can take place under such conditions.
    Yes, arguably, there can be good education, but
    comparatively speaking it will not even begin to
    compare with the education in developed urban
    areas. The quality of education and standard
    thereof will not be high. Definitely, no one can
    expect a language laboratory in a deep rural area
    of KZN where they do not know what electricity
    is, let alone to have it. Resources play a major
    role in teaching of English.

30
CHALLENGES FACING DIFFERENT TYPES OF SCHOOLS

URBAN AND RURAL SCHOOL TYPES
RURAL SCHOOLS
TOWN SCHOOLS
TOWNSHIP SCHOOLS
INFORMAL SETTLEMENT SCHOOLS
  • Children of poor and
  • illiterate farm
  • workers
  • Long distances, no
  • transport
  • School on the farmers
  • land
  • Children led
  • families
  • High poverty levels
  • Lack of resources
  • Some have no
  • electricity
  • Rich schools
  • Children of the
  • middle and the elite
  • Dominantly white
  • teachers
  • Black schools, some
  • poor (moderately)
  • Mostly black teachers
  • Lack resources (some)

31
TRANSITION FROM FOUNDATION PHASE TO INTERMEDIATE
PHASE
  • Policy states that all learners shall offer an
    approved language as a subject in Grades 1 and 2
    and from Grade 3 onwards all learners shall offer
    their language of learning and teaching and at
    least one additional approved language as a
    subject.
  • This by implication means that a second language,
    (English in Black schools) is introduced to the
    learners at Grade 3 level and this is the exit
    level of Foundation Phase. These learners are now
    moving into the new phase i.e. the Intermediate
    phase (Grade 4-6). In the Intermediate Phase,
    learners meet individual learning areas
    (Subjects) taught by individual teachers for the
    first time.

32
TRANSITION CONT
  • These teachers are frustrated by the fact that
    learners still do not have a well founded
    foundation in English and all the subjects are
    taught in English. They first have to start
    teaching the language or have to code switch or
    translate, for better understanding otherwise,
    learners will not understand a thing of what is
    being taught. This retards the learning process.
  • All this brings bad air between Foundation Phase
    and Intermediate Phase teachers. The big question
    is When exactly should English be introduced?

33
DEVELOPMENTS AND PROGRAMMES FOR SUPPORT OF
TEACHING ENGLISH TO YOUNG LEARNERS
  • Quality Improvement, Development, Support and
    Uplifment Support Programme (QIDSUP)
  • National Curriculum Statements ( NCS)
  • ITHUBA PROJECT
  • Accelerated Programme for Language, Literacy and
    communication (APLLC)
  • LITERACY CELEBRATION

34
PROGRAMMES CONT
  • Education remains a cornerstone of all efforts
    to deal with underdevelopment and economic
    growth. It also provides the necessary skills and
    capacity that allows people to escape the poverty
    trap (Premier Shilowa state of the Province
    address 2007)
  • As part of the National Initiative the Quality
    Improvement, Development, Support and Upliftment
    Programme (QIDS-UP) is an affirmative action
    programme to give all Gauteng schools an equal
    chance to provide quality education for all its
    learners.
  • QIDS UP is a flagship programme of government to
    improve quality of schooling experience for
    learners in the poorest schools.
  • The programme will run for a period of 5 years
    (2006 2010) targeting no-fee schools serving
    about 1, 2 million learners across the country.
  • It is a multi-pronged strategy to turn around the
    quality of teaching and learning

35
PROGRAMMES CONT
  • The programme primarily seeks to improve the
    quality of teaching and learning of Literacy and
    Numeracy skills amongst learners from
    impoverished communities and will further provide
    the poorly resourced schools with the most basic
    resources in order for these schools to meet the
    challenges of the 21st century based on the
    curriculum needs. The objective of this programme
    is to reach approximately 618 258 learners in 819
    schools in quintiles 1 to 3 and will primarily
    target schools that have been declared no-fee
    schools.
  • The main aim of Qidsup is adequate Resourcing for
    effective implementation of curriculum and
    improving learner competence levels in Numeracy
    and Literacy also to improve Leadership,
    Management and Governance and further strengthen
    monitoring and evaluation of school performance
    and learner performance

36
PROGRAMMES CONT
  • The programme started in 2007 and will continue
    to March 2010 and will target primary schools,
    grades R - 7 in the poorest of our schools.
    Quintiles 3 will be incorporated in the programme
    fully in 2008/9 and from 2009/10 Selected schools
    from quintiles 4 5 will be included. This
    programme will help reduce the challenge of lack
    of books or print rich environment.

37
NATIONAL CURRICULUM STATEMENTS (NCS)
  • Transformation and development aims to heal the
    divisions of the past and establish society based
    on democratic values, social justice and
    fundamental human rights. Languages as a subject
    in schools, is faced with even a bigger challenge
    to impact and improve the lives of young South
    African citizens, to further improve the quality
    of life and free potential of each person.
  • NCS are for the purpose of laying a good
    foundation for a single national core syllabus
    and to overtly remove racist and other
    insensitive language from existing syllabus. The
    NCS seeks to embody the values in the knowledge
    and skills it develops. It encourages amongst all
    learners an awareness and understanding of the
    rich diversity of cultures, beliefs and world
    views within which the unity of South Africa is
    manifested.

38
NATIONAL CURRICULUM STATEMENTS (NCS)
  • Languages Learning Area has six Learning Outcomes
    (LOs) and these comprise of Assessment standards
    that are a vehicle to achieving the intended
    outcome. The Assessment Standards determine what
    activities / assessment tasks can, both the
    teacher and the learner can engage in, to
    demonstrate the level of achieving the Learning
    Outcomes.
  • The NCS in Languages learning Area contributes to
    the curriculum as curriculum transformation
    (content, knowledge, skills and values) vehicle.
  • Curriculum and teacher development theories and
    practices in recent times have focused on the
    role of the teacher as a specialist in the
    development and implementation of effective
    teaching, learning and assessment practices.
    Teachers are encouraged to develop and implement
    their own learning Programmes.

39
LANGUAGES LEARNING OUTCOMES
  • LISTENING
  • The learner will be able to listen to
    information and
  • enjoyment and respond appropriately in a wide
    range of situations
  • SPEAKING
  • The learner will be able to communicate
    confidently in
  • spoken language.
  • READING AND VIEWING
  • The learner will be able to read and view for
    information and enjoyment and respond critically
    cultural and
  • emotional values in the text.

40
LANGUAGES LEARNING OUTCOMES cont.
  • WRITING
  • The learner will be able to write different
    kinds of factual and imaginative texts for a wide
    range of purposes.
  • THINKING AND REASONING
  • The learner will be able to use language to
    think and reason as well as to access, process
    and use Information for learning.
  • LANGUAGE STRUCTURE AND USE
  • The learner will be able to use
  • The sounds, words and grammar of the language to
    create and interpret texts.

41
LANGUAGES LEARNING OUTCOMES cont.
  • These outcomes have been written to give specific
    focus to particular kinds of knowledge and skills
    and to make them clear and understandable. When
    we use language we integrate knowledge, skills
    and values to express ourselves.

42
HOW THESE PROGRAMMES ARE SUPPORTED
  • Human resources (at District and school level)
    indicating the level of expertise
  • All the districts are capacitated with languages
    facilitators who are knowledgeable and trained in
    the NCS. They are supported and developed through
    workshops e.g. NCS training. They are again
    supported through Common Information Forum
    meetings, cluster meetings and joined visits to
    schools (both Head and District office
    officials).
  • They (district Officials) in turn support
    teachers through workshops, cluster meetings,
    trainings, school and class visits.
  • They also are responsible for sensitising
    parents, principals, district managers, SMT as
    well officials from support services on the
    importance of learning in English and the Home
    language.

43
HOW THESE PROGRAMMES ARE SUPPORTED
44
ITHUBA PROJECT
  • Ithuba is a programme that teaches teachers to
    write, edit and print their own stories, i.e. to
    become authors in both English and Home language
    (s). This is the collaborated programme between
    USAID and National Department of Education and is
    run in the three provinces, Limpopo, Mpumalanga
    and Gauteng. The trainers of the project are from
    the services of the NGOs READ and Molteno.
  • Teachers are nominated to attend this workshop
    from all the 15 districts and are trained
    vigorously on this programme to be able to
    implement in their schools so as to produce more
    authors from their learners. This is the main
    intention of the programme t promote writing
    (English and Home Language) and reading.

45
ITHUBA PROJECT CONT
  • Books are written, edited, printed and published,
    and it really is an honour for both teachers and
    the Department to have produced authors through
    this programme.
  • The benefit of this programme is that teachers
    are skilled as authors and are be able to
    inculcate these skills into learners. i.e.
    learners also become authors of tomorrow
  • The Ithuba project seeks to support type of
    languages/communities that have been previously
    marginalised.

46
APLLC
  • The objective of this strategy is to implement an
    in-service teacher education programme in
    accelerating learners language literacy and
    communication and also to mentor and support
    teachers in implementing methodologies in the
    classroom.
  • It is also aiming at accelerating listening,
    speaking, writing and comprehension skills of
    learners through teacher training, mentoring and
    monitoring programme linked to appropriate
    resource provisioning in public schools.
  • All these will help overcome barriers to
    learning. Foundation Phase has already started
    with the programme and now Intersen officials
    have been trained to can train the teachers next
    year.

47
APLLC cont.
  • JET, another partner in the programme, does the
    evaluation and analysis of results from systemic
    evaluation by OFSTED. The Education Department
    and READ will train the teachers and also monitor
    and support the implementation of this strategy.

48
CONSTRAINTS ON IMPLEMENTATION OF THESE
DEVELOPMENTS AND SUPPORT PROGRAMMES
  • Competing Priorities
  • APPLLC is a good methodology, but
  • When are the teachers to be trained on this
    methodology?
  • Should they be taken out of class and leave the
    children unattended to be trained?
  • Should they be trained over weekends?
  • Will attendance be good more so that there is no
    remuneration? Should they be trained over school
    holidays?
  • will unions allow it without gripes?
  • The only option for the Department of Education
    after exploring all these avenues was after
    school training. How long is after school
    training? Is two hours of training after a hard
    days work and travelling sufficient? Will it
    yield good results? These are some of the
    challenges facing programmes that are being put
    in place to improve teaching of a language.

49
Gaps in the policy
  • Sometimes, as indicated earlier that the South
    Africa comes from the apartheid era where white
    people enjoyed the benefits of the country more
    than the black people, there are still those
    white people who have not yet moved with the
    democracy in South Africa, hence, as the
    governing bodies of the schools, they will use
    language as disadvantaging tool not to accept the
    learners in a school.
  • But how so?

50
Gaps cont
  • Policy states that
  • The learner must choose the language of teaching
    upon application for admission to a particular
    school. Where a school uses the language of
    learning and teaching chosen by the learner, and
    where there is a place available in the relevant
    grade, the school must admit the learner.
  • In this case in most former white schools the
    governing bodies use their powers to determine
    the Lolt of the school and disadvantage the black
    learners to attend at that school. e.g. an
    Afrikaans school that wants to remain purely
    Afrikaans will use Afrikaans as the Lolt of the
    school and this will disadvantage black
    learners since Afrikaans is not even one of
    their options in choosing a language. Even if
    there is a place, as the policy states, the
    learner does not understand the language, so what
    will they learn? Only Afrikaans learners will
    attend there.

51
STORAGE AND SECURITY
  • APLLC is one of the initiatives to eradicate
    illiteracy in poor schools by providing basic
    resources, however the big question that arises
    from time to time is that the schools appreciate
    the good gesture of the Department but there is
    no security in their schools for safe keeping of
    these resources, there is no storage for these
    resources, over and above all there is no proper
    infrastructure. (Some schools are still attended
    under the trees)

52
CONCLUSION
  • African children learn in overcrowded schools
    and have a high failure rate. It is the township
    schools where the African child is based that are
    dysfunctional. This must be brought to a complete
    halt (Premier Shilowa state of the Province
    address 2007)
  • The purpose of teaching language(s) is that
    languages are central to our lives. We
    communicate and understand our world through
    language. Language thus shapes our identity and
    knowledge.
  • Languages serve a variety of purposes, which are
    reflected in the Languages Learning Area
    Statements and these are

53
CONCLUSION cont
  • personal purpose - to sustain, develop and
    transform identities
  • communication -to communicate appropriately and
    effectively
  • education - to develop tools for thinking and
    reasoning
  • aesthetic - to create and interpret oral and
    visual and written texts
  • culture - to understand and appreciate languages
    and cultures and heritage they carry
  • politics - to assert oneself and challenge others
  • critical - to understand the relationship between
    language, power and identity and to resist
    persuasion and positioning

54
CONCLUSION cont
  • For a society, the price of disengagement from
    learning leads to serious social problems and
    social exclusions. Low motivation, truancy,
    behaviour problems and exclusion damage our
    communities and burden our economy. Education and
    skills linked to the production of wealth is the
    key to achieving a successful country.
  • Despite these challenges, South Africa as a
    country, cannot bury its head in the sand and
    cry, there is no hurdle that cannot be jumped.
    The trick to eat the whole elephant without
    choking is to eat it small by piece by small
    piece. As the saying goes Rome was never built in
    a day.
  • It takes a village to teach a child and a reading
    nation is a winning nation.

55
HEITA DAAR
  • I THANK YOU
  • NGI YA BONGA
  • THOBELA
  • KE A LEBOGA
  • DANKIE
  • KHOTSO
  • ENKOSI
About PowerShow.com