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Using UML to report results of project management for information systems projects

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This paper considers the Project Management (PM) requirements of object-oriented ... Planning Object Oriented Projects. Program deliverables. Choice of ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Using UML to report results of project management for information systems projects


1
Using UML to report results of project management
for information systems projects
  • Donna M. Gavin
  • MMIS 621 Information Systems Project Management
  • Assignment 7 (del-b)

2
Outline of Paper
  • Abstract
  • Chapter 1 Introduction and Statement of Problem
  • Chapter 2 Overview of the Project
  • Chapter 3 Presentation of the Results
  • Meet the Enemies
  • Inadequate and Unstable requirements
  • Inadequate Requirements
  • Unstable Requirements
  • Inadequate customer communications..
  • Poor Team Communications
  • Unnecessary complexity...
  • Ineffective team behavior
  • Conquering Enemies with Object Technology
  • Team Communications
  • The Right Amount of Communication
  • Chapter 4 Conclusions, Implications and
    Recommendations
  • Planning Object Oriented Projects
  • Designing the SDP

3
Abstract
  • Quality system development can only occur with a
    coordinated strategy of planning and management.
    This paper considers the Project Management (PM)
    requirements of object-oriented (OO) system
    development and addresses the need of these PM
    requirements to form one complete strategy for
    the PM of OO developed systems (Carter and Patel,
    1999). In particular, this paper analyzes
    Unified Modeling Language (UML) for the project
    manager (Cantor, 1998).

4
Presentation of the Results
  • Meet the Enemies
  • Conquering Enemies with Object Technology
  • Team Communications
  • The Right Amount of Communication

5
Meet the Enemies
  • Inadequate and Unstable requirements.
  • Inadequate Requirements.
  • Unstable Requirements.
  • Inadequate customer communications
  • Poor Team Communications.
  • Unnecessary complexity.
  • Ineffective team behavior.

6
Conquering Enemies with Object Technology
  • Dynamic and static descriptions of requirements
  • Dynamic and static descriptions of design
  • Encapsulatio
  • Inheritance
  • Aggregation
  • Packages

7
Team Communications
  • ü      To provide the opportunity to establish a
    common vocabulary.
  • ü      To create a visual representation of the
    system model.

8
The Right Amount of Communication
  • ü      System specification
  • ü      System design
  • ü      Implementation
  • ü      Test
  • ü      User documentation and training
  • ü      Maintenance
  • ü      Configuration management

9
UML can help by
  • ü     Document and communicate dynamic,
    operational requirements
  • ü     Document and communicate software design
  • ü     Evaluate the quality of a good design
  • ü     Trace the design back to the requirements
  • ü     Represent the code components

10
UML Provides
  • Use-case diagrams
  • Class and package diagrams
  • Sequence diagrams
  • Component diagrams

11
Chapter 4 Conclusions, Implications and
Recommendations
  • Planning Object Oriented Projects
  • Designing the SDP

12
Planning Object Oriented Projects
  • Program deliverables
  • Choice of development lifecycle
  • Program staff organization
  • Required resources
  • Schedule
  • Work breakdown structure

13
Designing the SDP
  • 1.      Deliverables.
  • 2.      Development environment.
  • 3.      Size and effort estimates.
  • 4.      Risk planning.
  • 5.      Choice of lifecycle model.
  • 6.      Work breakdown structure (WBS).
  • 7.      Schedules such as Gantt charts (see
    Figure 4) and Pert charts
  • 8.      Staffing and organization.
  • 9.      Time-phased budget.
  • 10.  Program metrics identification and
    collection strategy (Moriarty, 2001).
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