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Federal Response Agencies Plans and Programs for Animal Disease Emergencies

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Title: Federal Response Agencies Plans and Programs for Animal Disease Emergencies


1
Federal Response Agencies Plans and Programs for
Animal Disease Emergencies
2
Federal Agencies
  • U.S. Department of Agriculture
  • Animal and Plant HealthInspection Service
    (APHIS)
  • Veterinary Services
  • Emergency Management and Diagnostics
  • National Center for Animal Health Emergency
    Management
  • National Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories

3
Livestock Quarantine Stations
  • Import quarantine of livestock and poultry
  • 4 facilities
  • 2002, livestock imports
  • 1.5 million cattle
  • 5.8 million pigs
  • Personally owned birds
  • 6 quarantine facilities

4
USDA-APHIS-VSDiagnostic Laboratories
  • Foreign Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory
    (FADDL)
  • Plum Island, NY
  • Provide diagnosticservices and training
  • National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL)
  • Ames, IA

5
National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN)
6
USDA Personnel in Iowa
  • Area Veterinarian In Charge (AVIC)
  • Dr. Kevin Petersburg
  • 9-Federal Veterinary Medical Officers
  • All are Foreign Animal Disease Diagnosticians
  • Area Emergency Coordinator
  • Dr. Stephen Goff
  • Iowa, Nebraska

7
USDA Federal Veterinary Medical Officers
(VMO) Dr. Kevin Petersburg, Area Veterinarian In
Charge (AVIC) Work 515-284-4140
Dr. Pamela Smith
Dr. Tim Smith
Dr. Gary E. Eiben
Lyon
Dickinson
Osceola
Emmet
Kossuth
Winnebago
Worth
Winneshiek
Howard
Mitchell
Allamakee
Clay
Sioux
O'Brien
Palo Alto
Hancock
Cerro Gordo
Floyd
Chickasaw
Dr. Neil Rippke
Clayton
Fayette
Buena Vista
Pocahontas
Wright
Franklin
Bremer
Butler
Plymouth
Cherokee
Humboldt
Webster
Buchanan
Dubuque
Delaware
Black Hawk
Woodbury
Ida
Sac
Calhoun
Hamilton
Hardin
Grundy

Dr. Sharon Fairchild
Jones
Linn
Benton
Tama
Jackson
Dr. John Schiltz
Monona
Crawford
Carroll
Greene
Boone
Marshall
Story
Clinton
Cedar
Harrison
Shelby
Jasper
Audubon
Guthrie
Polk
Poweshiek
Iowa
Johnson
Dallas
Scott
Muscatine
Pottawattamie
Cass
Adair
Madison
Warren
Marion
Mahaska
Keokuk
Washington
Louisa

Montgomery
Mills
Henry
Jefferson
Wapello
Monroe
Lucas
Clarke
Union
Adams
Dr. R.E. Welander
Des
Moines
Dr. James Johnson
Fremont
Page
Taylor
Ringgold
Decatur
Wayne
Appanoose
Davis
Van Buren
Lee

Dr. Don Otto
February. 2008
8
U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS)
  • Customs and Border Protection
  • 317 ports of entry into US
  • Monitor for imported animal and plant material
  • Over 40,000 employees
  • 3,000 agriculture specialists
  • 1 million conveyances
  • 83 million passengers
  • 3.6 million cargo inspections
  • U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)

9
DHS Beagle Brigade
  • 141 detector dog teams in the U.S.
  • 24 at intl airports
  • 9 at ports of entry on land
  • 9 at intl mail facilities
  • 2002, 8 million passengers searched
  • Over 22,000 vehicles and43,000 aircraft
  • 75,000 interceptions annually

10
Veterinary Response Teams
  • National Veterinary Response Teams (NVRT)
  • Veterinary Medical Assistance Teams (VMAT)
  • National Animal Health Emergency Response Corps
    (NAHERC)

11
HSPD-9
  • Homeland Security Presidential Directive 9
    Management of Domestic Incidents
  • January 30, 2004
  • National policy to defend the nations
    agriculture and food system against terrorist
    attacks, major disasters and other emergencies
  • Develop a National Veterinary Stockpile

12
National Veterinary Stockpile
  • HSPD-9 (Jan 30, 2004)
  • National repository of critical veterinary
    supplies
  • Vaccine, antiviral, drugs
  • PPE kits
  • Deploying within 24 hours
  • Support response efforts for 40 days

13
National Animal Identification System (NAIS)
  • National program
  • Created to identify and track livestock
  • State to state consistency
  • More rapid tracing of animals in disease outbreak
  • Maintain contact information that can be accessed
    in case of an animal health emergency to speed
    notification Starts with premise ID
  • Followed by Animal ID

14
Other Federal Agencies
  • Department of Homeland Security
  • FEMA Federal Emergency Management Agency
  • Department of Justice
  • Law enforcement activities
  • Department of State
  • International response activities
  • Department of Defense
  • Authorizes Defense Support of Civil Authorities

15
National Response Framework
  • Animal Disease Emergencies

16
National Response Framework
  • Released January 2008
  • Successor of NRP
  • Effective March 22, 2008
  • All-hazards approach
  • Unified All-discipline
  • Flexible and scalable
  • Best practices and procedures
  • Allows Federal, State, local and tribal
    governments and the private sector to work
    together

17
NRF Applicability and Scope
  • Provides national operational/resource
    coordination framework for domestic incident
    management of national significance
  • Details federal incident management
    structure/coordination processes
  • Details overarching roles and responsibilities

18
National Response Framework
  • A basic premise
  • Incidents are handled at the lowest
    jurisdictional level possible
  • Emphasis on local response and identifying
    personnel responsible for incident management at
    the local level
  • E.g., police, fire, public health,medical or
    emergency management
  • Private sector is key partner

19
NRF Components
  • Core document
  • Structure and process
  • Emergency Support Function Annexes
  • Federal resources and capabilities
  • Functional Areas
  • Support Annexes
  • Support aspects common to all incidents
  • Incident Annexes
  • Unique aspects of select incidents
  • Partner Guides
  • Ready references describing key roles for local,
    tribal, State, Federal and private sector response

20
The 15 ESFs
Slide used with permission from Dr. Dahna Batts,
CDC/COCA.
21
Response Five Key Principles
  • Engaged partnership
  • Tiered response
  • Scalable, flexible and adaptable operational
    capabilities
  • Unity of effort through unified command
  • Readiness to act

22
Local Roles and Responsibilities
  • Chief Elected or Appointed Official
  • Ensure public safety and welfare
  • Provide strategic guidance and resources
  • Coordinate resources within jurisdictions, among
    adjacent jurisdictions, with private sector
  • Emergency Manager
  • Oversees emergency programs and activities
  • Coordinate jurisdiction capabilities
  • Department and Agency Heads
  • Perform emergency management functions
  • Local emergency plans, provide response resources

23
Local Roles and Responsibilities
  • Individuals and Households
  • Reduce hazards in and around their homes
  • Prepare an emergency supply kit and household
    emergency plan
  • Monitor emergency communications carefully
  • Volunteer with an established organization
  • Enroll in emergency response training courses

24
Local Roles and Responsibilities
  • Private Sector Organizations
  • Welfare and protection of employees
  • Maintain essential services
  • Water, power, communications, transportation,
    medical care, security
  • Stay involved in local crisis decision making
    process
  • NGO Nongovernmental Organizations
  • Provide sheltering, emergency food spplies,
    counseling, etc.
  • Provide specialized services for those with
    special needs

25
The Food and Agriculture Incident Annex
  • Detect event
  • Establish primarycoordinating agency
  • Determine source ofthe incident or outbreak
  • Control distributionof the affected source
  • Identify and protect the population at risk
  • Assess public health, food, agriculture, and law
    enforcement implications
  • Assess any residual contamination and
    decontaminate and dispose as necessary

26
For More Information
  • NRF Resource Center
  • http//www.fema.gov/emergency/nrf/mainindex.htm
  • NRF Brochure
  • http//www.fema.gov/pdf/emergency/nrf/about_nrf.pd
    f
  • NRF Fact Sheet
  • http//www.fema.gov/pdf/emergency/nrf/NRFOnePageFa
    ctSheet.pdf
  • NRF Frequently Asked Questions
  • http//www.fema.gov/pdf/emergency/nrf/NRF_FAQ.pdf

27
Acknowledgments
  • Development of this presentationwas funded by a
    grant from theIowa Homeland Securityand
    Emergency Management andthe Iowa Department of
    Agriculture and Land Stewardship to theCenter
    for Food Security and Public Health at Iowa State
    University.
  • Contributing Authors Glenda Dvorak, DVM, MPH,
    DACVPM Danelle Bickett-Weddle, DVM, MPH, DACVPM
    Gayle Brown, DVM, PhD
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