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Collaborative Expedition Workshop

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Title: Collaborative Expedition Workshop


1
Collaborative Expedition Workshop 35Design
Workshop to Frame National Dialogue on
Intelligent Information Use in Manufacturing and
Implications for e-Government
  • September 14, 2004
  • National Science Foundation
  • Room 555, Stafford II
  • Ballston, VA

2
Introduction
  • The Collaborative Expedition Workshops (CEW)
    serve individuals and policy-makers from all
    sectors government, business, and non-government
    organizations to practice an emerging societal
    form that advances realization of the
    citizen-centric government goal of the
    President's Management Agenda.
  • Each workshop organizes participation around a
    common purpose, larger than any institution,
    including government. By learning how to
    appreciate multiple perspectives around the
    potentials and realities of this larger
    "purpose", subsequent actions of individuals
    representing many forms of expertise, can be
    expressed more effectively in their respective
    settings.
  • The monthly workshops seek to advance the quality
    of citizen-government dialogue and collaborations
    at the crossroads of intergovernmental
    initiatives, Communities of Practice, Federal IT
    research and IT user agencies in order to advance
    collaborative innovations in government and
    community services such as emergency
    preparedness, environmental monitoring,
    healthcare and law enforcement.

3
Introduction
  • A key finding of last year, was the need to apply
    emerging technologies (web services, grid
    computing, and semantic web) to tune up the
    innovation pipeline with better linkages among
    business incubators (state economic development
    programs), innovation diffusion networks (SBIR,
    angel investors, etc.) and business intelligence
    centers with quality information about
    e-government and e-commerce gaps.
  • Many of the agile business components surfacing
    in the small business innovation world are not
    easily discovered by e-government managers,
    resulting in lost or delayed opportunities for
    both parties.
  • To address this potential, a quarterly Emerging
    Components Conference Series was this year. Four
    national dialogue conferences have been held thus
    far two at the White House Conference Center,
    one at the Washington DC Convention Center and
    one at MITRE. For more information see
    http//componenttechnology.org.

4
Introduction
  • Workshop Sponsors
  • The General Services Administration's Office of
    Intergovernmental Solutions.
  • Architecture and Infrastructure Committee of the
    Federal CIO Council.
  • National Coordination Office of the Interagency
    Committee on IT RD (Social, Economic and
    Workforce Implications of IT and IT Workforce
    Development (SEW) Coordinating Group).
  • All value this "frontier outpost" to open up
    quality conversations, augmented by information
    technology, to leverage the collaborative
    capacity of united, but diverse sectors of
    society, seeking to discover, frame, and act on
    national potentials.

5
Introduction
  • Past Workshop Archives, Collaborative Pilots, and
    Related Resources
  • http//ua-exp.gov
  • http//colab.cim3.net
  • http//web-services.gov
  • http//componenttechnology.org
  • http//www.gsa.gov/intergov
  • http//www.itrd.gov

6
Introduction
  • Upcoming Events
  • September, 20-22, 2004, Enterprise Architecture
    Conference, September 21, 215-330 p.m., Session
    3-5 Best Practices for Adopting Service-Oriented
    Architectures.
  • October 19, 2004, Collaborative
    Expedition-Emerging Technology Workshop 36 at
    the NSF. Evolving a Multi-Stakeholder Process for
    Identifying Emerging Technology Using Ontology
    and Taxonomy Best Practices Introduction to
    Tiger Teams and Sprints.
  • October 25, 2004, Fifth Emerging Technology
    Components Conference, Hosted at MITRE.
  • See Componenttechnology.Org for details.
  • November 16, 2004, Collaborative
    Expedition-Emerging Technology Workshop 37 at
    the NSF.

7
Introduction
  • To help our Enterprise Architecture, Emerging
    Technology, and Federal Networking and
    Information Technology Research Development
    (NITRD) communities understand the broad
    implications of Intelligent Information Use in
    Manufacturing
  • What lessons from the manufacturing sector offer
    valuable context for intergovernmental agreements
    around knowledge sharing and enterprise
    innovations?
  • What is unfolding at the frontier of this
    important Information Space today?
  • What are the strategic priorities and
    relationships that can frame the planning for
    national dialogue around this strategic
    opportunity?
  • Who needs to be included in this dialogue?
  • What are the implications for Intelligent
    Information Use in Manufacturing, in light of the
    global build-out of cyber-infrastructure?

8
Introduction
  • Continued
  • What environmental, trade, and corporate (both
    tangible and intangible assets) governance
    mechanisms are inextricably linked to this global
    connectedness?
  • Will automated integration be achieved as trusted
    relationships mature?
  • What are the implications and challenges likely
    to arise for US industry (regulated and
    non-regulated), financial institutions,
    shareholders, state economic development
    programs, and global intermediaries?
  • How can we anticipate the realistic scenarios
    needed to form sound alliances and manage risk?

9
Introduction
  • Continued
  • How can Intelligent Information Use in
    Manufacturing contribute to the triple bottom
    line - Environment, Social and Economic aspects
    of corporate performance?
  • Will business incubators (state economic
    development programs) and innovation diffusion
    networks (SBIR, seed investment, angel investors,
    etc.) have a role as frontier outposts for
    Intelligent Information Use in Manufacturing?
  • Will frontier outposts for Intelligent
    Information Use in Manufacturing be the first
    adopters of open, semantic technologies (like
    ontological standards or semantic web-services)
    that "distill" and "apply" the smart-data,
    -information and -knowledge needed by both people
    and machines to solve complex problems within
    their work environments?
  • How can the relationships, business processes,
    and tools needed by diverse people to augment
    their "collective intelligence" around
    manufacturing be designed to support and not
    hobble, people's natural forms of expertise?

10
Introduction
  • Semantics for Manufacturing
  • Manufacturing paradigms have changed. Now, the
    model is to design where the knowledge is,
    manufacture where labor and other factors are
    most economical and compete in global markets. A
    key theme is the role of knowledge-based
    technologies in smart products and processes.
  • According to Craig Schlenoff of NIST (National
    Institute of Standards and Technology), the
    evolution toward smart products and processes
    starts with common models of data, then advances
    to explicit, formal semantics (dealing with the
    relationships rather than just the terminology),
    to self-describing systems, and eventually to
    self-integrating systems (see next slide figure).
  • The goal is to create autonomic and autonomous
    systems that know, learn and can reason as people
    do and can self-evolve. Currently, the aims of
    advanced manufacturing studies are to develop
    methodologies and approaches to machine learning
    and rational theory construction in every area
    well practiced by humans.

Source Mills Davis, TopQuadrant, Inc.,
Semantics for Manufacturing (pages 18-19) in
Next-Wave Publishing, Part 3 Revolutions in
Content, Seybold Reports, Vol. 3, No. 23 March
15, 2004. Also Invited Speaker at the Second
Annual Semantic Technologies for E-Government
Conference, September 8-9, 2004, The MITRE
Corporation, McLean, VA.
11
Introduction
Figure 13 Systems That Know, Learn and Evolve.
This diagram depicts stages in the evolution of
intelligent products and processes.
12
Introduction
http//colab.cim3.net/wiki/ 
13
Agenda
  • 830 a.m. - Check-in, Box Lunch Order
    (8.00/person) and Coffee
  • 900 a.m. - Welcome and Introduction
  • Susan Turnbull, GSA, Emerging Technology
    Subcommittee, Brand Niemann, EPA, Emerging
    Technology Subcommittee and Semantic
    Interoperability CoP, Knowledge Management
    Subcommittee, Steve Ray, NIST, Peter Yim, CIM
    Engineering, Inc., Suzi Iacono, NSF, and George
    Hazelrigg, NSF
  • 915 a.m. - Intelligent Information Use in
    Manufacturing - Some Government Perspectives
  • Steve Ray, Chief, Manufacturing Systems
    Integration Division, National Institute of
    Standards and Technology, Intelligent Information
    Use in Manufacturing (NIST)
  • George Hazelrigg, Program Director for
    Manufacturing Machines and Equipment, Division of
    Design, Manufacture, and Industrial Innovation
    NSF, Manufacturing Research Supported by the
    National Science Foundation
  • 1015 a.m. - BREAK

14
Agenda
  • 1030 a.m.- Intelligent Information Use in
    Manufacturing - Industry Perspectives
  • Leo Reddy, CEO and Founder, National Council for
    Advanced Manufacturing
  • Alexander Morgan, Principal Research Scientist,
    Manufacturing Systems Research Laboratory,
    General Motors
  • Adrian Walker, CTO, Reengineering, LLC, Semantics
    and the Web e-Government Implications of Some
    Emerging Technology Beyond W3C
  • 1200-noon - Networking Lunch
  • 100 p.m.- Intelligent Information Use in
    Manufacturing - Academic Perspectives
  • Sk Gupta, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering,
    University of Maryland, Improving Product
    Realization Through Intelligent Information
    Management
  • Zhi Long Chen, R H Smith School of Business,
    University of Maryland, Information Technology
    Information Sharing in Supply Chains
  • Evren Sirin James Hendler, University of
    Maryland, Semantic Web and Web Services
  • 200 p.m. - BREAK

15
Agenda
  • 230 p.m. - Panel Session addressing some key
    questions
  • What are the Potentials and Realities for
    National Dialogue Around Intelligent Information
    Use in Manufacturing?
  • What are the Strategic Priorities and
    Relationships that We Can Build Upon?
  • Commitment to Action and Reflection Next Steps
    Toward National Dialogue
  • 345 p.m. - Reflections from workshop presenters
    and participants
  • What are the principal findings from the dialogue
    around strategic priorities and relationships?
  • How has this "larger landscape" relative to
    Intelligent Information Use in Manufacturing
    influenced your perspective on actions that could
    be taken toward this purpose as a strategic
    leader in your setting?
  • 415 p.m. - ADJOURN

16
Some Questions Face-to-Face Virtual Workshops
  • 1. What are the Potentials and Realities for
    National Dialogue Around Intelligent
    Manufacturing?
  • a. What is the future of manufacturing for the
    US?
  • b. What is the value of a strong manufacturing
    sector to the economy of the nation?
  • c. Eventually when efficiency and productivity
    catches up, the total size of the workforce that
    needs to be involved in manufacturing (globally)
    will come down (like what has happened in
    agriculture)
  • d. What are the challenges arising for US
    industry (regulated and non-regulated), financial
    institutions, shareholders, state economic
    development programs, and global intermediaries?

17
Some Questions Face-to-Face Virtual Workshops
  • 1. What are the Potentials and Realities for
    National Dialogue Around Intelligent
    Manufacturing? (continued)
  • e. What are the implications of "outsourcing"
    production, then pilot production, then
    engineering, then design and eventually RD?
  • f. How could the nation capture and retain more
    benefits or earlier benefits from manufacturing
    research?
  • g. What would be a good strategy when facing
    globalization? What are the implications for
    Intelligent Information Use in Manufacturing, in
    light of the global build-out of
    cyber-infrastructure?
  • h. What environmental, trade, and corporate (both
    tangible and intangible assets) governance
    mechanisms are inextricably linked to our growing
    global connectedness?

18
Some Questions Face-to-Face Virtual Workshops
  • 2. What are the strategic priorities and
    relationships that could frame planning for
    national dialogue around this strategic
    opportunity? Who needs to be included in this
    dialogue?
  • a. What lessons from the manufacturing sector
    offer valuable context for intergovernmental
    agreements around knowledge-sharing and
    enterprise innovations?
  • b. How could government, academe and industry
    more effectively share information on
    manufacturing technology and research results?
  • c. In light of a distributed-intelligence
    manufacturing scenario
  • - What are good strategies for US business?
  • - What new roles and relationships among
    manufacturing actors could be supported by
    enterprise information integration?
  • - What is a US business anyway?
  • d. What about employment and the job situation?
  • e. What is the role of new connection-making
    technologies in advancing shared understanding
    among diverse groups of manufacturing domain
    actors? Will automated integration be achieved as
    trusted relationships mature?

19
Some Questions Face-to-Face Virtual Workshops
  • 2. What are the strategic priorities and
    relationships that could frame planning for
    national dialogue around this strategic
    opportunity? Who needs to be included in this
    dialogue? (continued)
  • f. How could we anticipate the realistic
    scenarios needed to form sound alliances and
    manage risk?
  • g. How could semantic technologies support rapid
    connection-making that is valued for enhancing
    capacity and discernment, as evidenced by the
    increasing number of effective, but simultaneous
    roles and relationships that individuals maintain
    within and across manufacturing and other areas
    of human endeavor?
  • h. What joint governance mechanisms are needed to
    mature the conducive environments needed by
    trusted practitioner networks of manufacturers?
    How can small business innovators be included?
    How could the manner in which they work
    (horizontally and vertically) be transformed?
  • i. Will business incubators (state economic
    development programs) and innovation diffusion
    networks (SBIR, seed investment, angel investors,
    etc.) have a role as frontier outposts for
    Intelligent Information Use in Manufacturing?
  • j. How could Intelligent Information Use in
    Manufacturing contribute to the triple bottom
    line - Environment, Social and Economic aspects
    of corporate performance?

20
Some Questions Face-to-Face Virtual Workshops
  • 3. Commitment to Action and Reflection Next
    Steps Toward National Dialogue
  • a. What are the implications of new ways of
    organizing for better problem-formulation and
    action?
  • b. What is the role of Communities of Practice in
    problem-centered development that cuts across
    boundaries using web tools to support
    connection-making and accelerate learning that
    contributes to global competitiveness?
  • c. How could open dialogue with transparency of
    records support understanding, trust and mitigate
    risk within and across interrelated domains?
  • d. Will frontier outposts of early adopters
    deploy open standard, semantic technologies to
    "distill" the context-aware -data - information
    and knowledge needed by people and machines to
    solve problems within complex adaptive systems?
  • e. How can the tools needed by diverse people to
    augment their "collective intelligence" around
    manufacturing be designed to support and not
    hobble people's natural forms of expertise?
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