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Transportation Sector Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Background

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Transport from rail to truck instead of truck only will ... The increase in remote-start technology on cars may significantly increase car idling emissions. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Transportation Sector Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Background


1
Transportation Sector Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Background Strategies
  • Local Government Climate Change Summit
  • Washington, DC
  • April 10, 2008
  • Paul Bubbosh, U.S. EPA

2
Overview
  • Transportation GHG emissions
  • Current situation
  • Trends for the future
  • Local government strategies to reduce carbon
    dioxide emissions from the transportation sector

3
U.S. GHG Emissions Inventory (2005)
4
Growth in U.S. GHG Emissions by Economic Sector
U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions by End Use Economic
Sector
  • 1990-2005
  • Total U.S. GHG Emissions up 16 percent
    (annualized rate of just over 1 percent)
  • Transportation GHG emissions up 32 percent
    (annualized rate of 1.87 percent)
  • Transportation accounted for 49 percent of the
    growth in total U.S. GHG emissions since 1990

U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Economic Sector
5
U.S. Transportation Sector GHG Emissions, 2005
Refrigerants and Lubricants 3.8
Pipelines
1.5
Rail
2.5
Boats and Ships 3.2
Aircraft
9.4
Passenger Cars 31.4
Commercial Aircraft 7.9
Buses and Motorcycles 0.8
Light-Duty Vehicles
Freight Trucks
59.5
Light-Duty Trucks 28.1
19.1
6
Change in GHGs from Major Transportation Sources,
1990-2005
Freight Trucks
Light-Duty Vehicles
Commercial Aircraft
7
Light-Duty Vehicles
GHGs from Light-Duty Vehicles, 1990-2005
  • 1990-2005
  • Passenger Car GHGs decreased by just under two
    percent
  • LD Truck GHGs increased by 72 percent
  • Total VMT up 38 percent (mainly light-duty truck)

Passenger Cars
Light-Duty Trucks
Light-Duty Vehicle VMT, 1990 and 2005
Light-Duty Truck VMT Up 84.4
Passenger Car VMT Up 19.2
8
Freight Sources
GHG Emissions, 1990-2005
Ton-Miles, 1990-2004
Sources Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas
Emissions and Sinks 1990-2005 National
Transportation Statistics 2005
9
Freight Trucks
  • GHGs increased 69.4 percent (3.6 percent
    annualized)
  • Medium- and heavy-duty trucks have become less
    energy efficient since the mid-1990s (VIUS data)
  • Fuel economy of medium trucks (10,000 to 26,000
    lbs) decreased from 8.6 MPG in 1997 to 8.0 mpg in
    2002
  • FE of heavy trucks (over 26,000 lbs) decreased
    from 6.1 MPG in 1997 to 5.8 MPG in 2002
  • Possible explanations for decreased fuel economy
  • Demand for more powerful engines
  • Impact of congestion
  • Elimination of mandatory speed limits

10
Transportation Sector Continues to Grow
  • Growth in GHG emissions from the U.S.
    transportation sector increased 32 from 1990 to
    2005 faster than any other U.S. sector.
  • Global growth in transportation is forecast to
    increase fuel use, and thus carbon emissions, by
    about 80 over 2002 levels by 2030.

11
Strategies
  • Reduce Idling (car, truck, delivery vans) 3
    Steps
  • (1) Implement state or local anti-idling law
  • See EPAs Model for State or Local Idling Law at
    www.epa.gov/smartway/idle-state.htm
  • (2) Educate drivers about the law (via signs)
  • See NJ DEPs Stop the Soot campaign at
    www.nj.gov/dep/stopthesoot/
  • (3) Enforce idling laws
  • Selective enforcement (1-2x/month at high
    priority areas sends a message)
  • Enter law in Federal SIP gets you (1) emission
    reduction credits, and (2) Federal enforcement

12
Strategies
  • Reduce Idling (rail yards) - 3 Steps
  • (1) Work with railroad company to implement
    no-idle policy for switchers and line haul
    engines
  • (2) Request that engine auto-start-stop and
    auxiliary power units are installed on all switch
    yard locomotives
  • (3) Retire older, pre-1972, unregulated
    locomotive engines

13
Strategies
  • Encourage Inter-Modal Yards at Major Distribution
    Centers
  • Transport from rail to truck instead of truck
    only will dramatically reduce emissions.

Energy Intensity of Freight Modes in 2004 (BTU /
ton-mile)
14
Strategies
  • Green Procurements
  • State local fleets buy the most fuel
    efficient vehicles
  • Consult EPAs Green Vehicle guide for best in
    class http//www.epa.gov/greenvehicles/
  • State local permits, procurement require
    clean and fuel efficient technologies
  • Consult EPAs list of verified emission control
    technologies http//www.epa.gov/otaq/retrofit/ve
    rif-list.htm

15
Strategies
  • Offer Financial Incentives
  • EPA National Clean Diesel Campaign Grants and
    Loans see http//www.epa.gov/diesel/
  • Local tax incentives for inter-modal yards
  • State/Local bond (tax-exempt or taxable)

16
Issues to Consider
  • Regulation of transportation emissions is
    Federally preemptive
  • The increase in remote-start technology on cars
    may significantly increase car idling emissions.
  • Anti-idling laws for locomotives may violate ICC
    law.

17
Additional Information
  • Greenhouse Gas Emissions from
  • Transportation and other Mobile Sources
  • http//www.epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/usinve
    ntoryreport.html
  • Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse
  • Gas Emissions and Sinks
  • http//www.epa.gov/climatechange/
  • emissions/usinventoryreport.html

18
For More Information
  • www.epa.gov/smartway
  • SmartWay Hotline 734-214-4767
  • Bubbosh.Paul_at_epa.gov
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