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OSHAAir Transport Sections Ergonomic Alliance for Baggage Handling

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Southwest Airlines. Continue Work on Current Initiatives. eTool ... Kim McDaniel Southwest. Richard Petriatis United. Penny Prince American Airlines ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: OSHAAir Transport Sections Ergonomic Alliance for Baggage Handling


1
OSHA/Air Transport Sections Ergonomic Alliance
for Baggage Handling
  • National Safety Congress
  • Wednesday, September 10, 2003
  • 1000 a.m.

2
(No Transcript)
3
OSHA/Airline Industry Alliance
  • History -OSHA Alliance Program
  • -Forming the Airline Industry Alliance
  • Lee Anne Jillings
  • Occupational Safety and Health Administration

4
OSHAs Strategic Management Plan, 2003-2008
  • By 2008, reduce fatality rates 15 and
    injury/illness
  • rates 20 through
  • Goal 1 Reduce occupational hazards through
    direct intervention
  • Goal 2 Promote safety and health culture
    through compliance assistance, cooperative
    programs, and strong leadership
  • Goal 3 Strengthen agency capabilities and
    infrastructure

5
Goal 2 Compliance Assistance, Cooperative
Programs Leadership
  • Promote a safety and health culture through
    compliance assistance, cooperative programs and
    strong leadership.
  • Strategy 2-1 Improve OSHAs ability to capture
    opportunities
  • where compliance assistance, leadership,
  • outreach, and cooperative programs will
    maximize
  • impact.
  • Strategy 2-2 Promote a safety and health
    culture through
  • Americas worksites.
  • Strategy 2-3 Improve the effectiveness of OSHAs
    approaches
  • for promoting safety and health.

6
OSHAs Alliance Program
  • Broadly Written Agreements
  • Established at OSHAs
  • National, Regional, Area Offices
  • or by State Plan States
  • Goals focus on
  • Training and Education
  • Outreach and Communication
  • Promoting the National Dialogue
  • Customized Implementation Teams
  • Two-years, Renewable
  • Quarterly Update Meetings or Conference Calls

7
Benefits of an Alliance
  • Build a cooperative and
  • trusting relationship with
  • OSHA
  • Network with other
  • organizations committed
  • to workplace safety and health
  • Leverage resources to maximize worker protection

8
(No Transcript)
9
National Alliances
  • Signed
  • The Dow Chemical Alliance Company
  • American Biological Safety Association
  • Society of the Plastics Industry
  • The Printing Industry
  • Recent/Upcoming
  • International Safety Equipment Association
  • National Safety Council
  • Network of Employers for Traffic Safety
  • Work Zone Coalition for Safety and Health

10
Airline Industry Alliance Members
  • American Airlines
  • American Trans Air
  • America West Airlines
  • Continental Airlines
  • Delta Air Lines
  • Jetblue Airways
  • Midwest Express Airlines
  • Southwest Airlines
  • United Airlines
  • US Airways
  • NSC International Air Transport Section
  • Air Canada
  • Airtran Airways
  • Alaska Airlines

11
Airline Industry Alliance Vision
  • Year 1
  • Define strategy and best practices
  • Educate and communicate process with interested
    parties
  • Share successes with others
  • -NSC Congress
  • -VPP Seminar

12
Airline Industry Alliance Vision
  • Year 2
  • Reaffirm membership
  • Review past year and identify specific projects
    and goals for upcoming year
  • Communicate with and educate interested parties
  • Expand awareness of the Alliance world-wide

13
Alliance Action Items
  • Training and Education
  • Develop a baggage handling training manual for
    employees
  • Outreach and Communication
  • Review and provide input on way to improve OSHAs
    e-tool
  • Develop Safety and Health Topics Page for the
    Airlines Industry
  • Hold a one-day seminar on OSHAs VPP process
  • -June 4, 2003, Delta Airlines, Atlanta,
    Georgia
  • Sponsor a workshop on the Alliance Program
  • -National Safety Council Congress, September
    10, 2002, Chicago, IL
  • -Review the Alliances first year for OSHAs
    National Office
  • Promote the National Dialogue on Workplace Safety
    Health
  • Educate interested parties on the ergonomics of
    baggage handling

14
Alliance Timeline Year 1
  • December 18, 2002 - Kick-off Meeting
  • OSHA, Washington, DC
  • January 27 28, 2003 - Workshop
  • OSHA Salt Lake Technical Center, Salt Lake City,
    UT
  • April 28 29, 2003 - Workshop
  • OSHA Salt Lake Technical Center, Salt Lake City,
    UT
  • June 4, 2003 - VPP Presentation
  • Delta Airlines, Atlanta, Georgia
  • September 10, 2003 - NSC Presentation/Panel
    Discussion
  • National Safety Council Congress, Chicago, IL
  • October 2003 - Group Performance Appraisal

15
(No Transcript)
16
OSHA/Airline Industry Alliance
  • VPP Seminar
  • Jim Swartz
  • Delta Air Lines

17
OSHA Programs
  • What is an OSHA Alliance?
  • Program created by OSHA to enable organizations
    committed to safety and health to collaborate
    with OSHA to prevent injuries.

Partnerships
VPP
Alliance
18
VPP Workshop
  • UAL, IAMAW
  • Alliance Members
  • COMAIR, Skywest, Northwest, ASA
  • LSG SkyChefs, ARAMARK, ITS Aviation, GAT Airline
    Ground Support
  • Corporate Performance Solutions, Marsh,
    Tropicanna, Georgetown University
  • VPPPA, NATA, NSC
  • Federal OSHA, State OSHA, TSA
  • Who?
  • 16 Airlines and Labor Groups
  • 4 Airline Servicing Companies
  • 3 Government Agencies
  • 4 Other Private Industries
  • 3 National Associations

19
VPP Workshop
  • When and When?
  • Delta Air Lines Star Status Maintenance
    Facility
  • June 4, 2003

20
VPP Workshop
  • Why VPP?
  • What is VPP?
  • National VPP/Alliance Overview
  • How VPP?
  • Application/Evaluation Process Overview
  • Delta VPP Team Process Overview
  • Mentoring Process Overview
  • Benefits of VPP
  • VPPPA

21
VPP Workshop
  • Why?
  • Relate VPP to Aviation Industry
  • Share Employee Driven Process
  • Establish Network for Outreach

22
OSHA/Airline Industry Alliance
  • The Experience
  • Holly Geiger Zimmerman
  • Alaska Airlines

23
Industry Apprehension
  • Some airlines may have feared
  • Alliance will result in more frequent
    inspections
  • Federal State OSHA inspectors would use
    Alliance information and work products
    inconsistently in the enforcement actions or
  • One size does not fit all each airline sees
    their business characteristics as unique

24
Traditional OSHA-Industry Perceptions
  • Industry personnel may have perceived OSHA as
  • -non-collaborative
  • -rule focused, not solution-oriented
  • During inspections/investigations, boundaries
    maintained, information flow is restricted
  • Inspections may only scratch the surface
  • -visual observations
  • -written program review
  • OSHA personnel not always familiar with
    industry-specific challenges that influence
    compliance capabilities

25
Planned Approach
  • To ensure individual airline Planeside Loading
    support and continued participation, the Alliance
    parameters were set
  • Specific goals
  • One-year timeline for completion of work products

26
Airline Participation
  • All signatories on the Alliance sent
    representation to the meetings
  • Meetings were conducted efficiently and at
    convenient times/locations
  • Open sharing of best practices between airlines
    to familiarize OSHA with existing efforts
  • Participants were open-minded to
    recommendations
  • Resulted in immediate changes to and development
    of resources

27
OSHA Participation
  • OSHA representatives dedicated many hours to
    Alliance implementation
  • OSHA representatives were considerate of inherent
    industry challenges
  • OSHA actively participated at all meetings
    including hosting airline members at SLC
    Technical Training Center and planning and
    presenting at the VPP Seminar
  • Recommendations for changes were realistic
    (economically/technologically feasible) and
    received well by airline representatives

28
OSHA/Airline Industry Alliance
  • eTool
  • Ashley West
  • Delta Air Lines

29
eTool Updates
  • Terminology updated to fit the Airline Industry
  • -Original eTool was more based on the
    manufacturing environment
  • -Terminology was mutually agreed upon by Alliance
    members
  • eTool format follows the process flow of airport

  • -Now divided into three sections (Check-In,
    Make-Up Room, Ramp) instead of four
    (Check-in, Bag Cart, Loading Conveyor, Bag
    Compartment)
  • -Dimensions of aircraft bins and equipment are
    now included

30
eTool Updates
  • Within the process flow, hazards are listed by
    level of automation and type of equipment
    utilized
  • -Original eTool listed hazards inconsistently
    from the front-line employees perspective
  • -Hazards are now listed by type of handling
    device (manual, semi-automated, automated), type
    of conveyor system (flat plate carousel, sloped
    carousel, double pier belts), and type of
    cart/container

31
eTool Updates
  • Possible solutions are now listed according to
    feasibility of implementation
  • -Original eTool possible solutions required
    consideration of limitations placed on airlines
    by
  • TSA
  • Airport authorities
  • FAA
  • Equipment (ground support and aircraft type)
  • Operation
  • -Possible solutions (administrative, work
    practice and engineering) are now listed based on
    operational and economical feasibility

32
Progress
  • Ramp Section published July 2003
  • Ticket Counter and Make-Up Room Sections to be
    published September 2003
  • eTool will be reviewed and updated annually per
    OSHA process and Alliance objective

33
Benefits for Airlines
  • Better understanding of the different processes
    within each company
  • Better understanding of OSHAs approach
  • Documented solutions to support and validate
    projects within each company
  • Sharing of ergonomics best practices among
    airlines

34
OSHA/Airline Industry Alliance
  • Baggage Handling Training Manual
  • Penny Prince
  • American Airlines

35
Areas of Concern
  • Injuries associated with baggage handling are the
    most prevalent injury for the aviation industry
  • Use of engineering controls is limited at this
    time due to technical and economic feasibility
  • The aviation industry does not have consistent
    training for best methods in baggage handling

36
Purpose
  • Cost effective and consistent training materials
  • Training that is most applicable to essential job
    functions
  • Training that is in the most usable format

37
Areas of Focus
  • The largest of injuries and employees
  • -baggage handling on the ramp
  • The type of injury with greatest concern
  • -musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs)
  • Top priority for all participating airlines
  • -planeside loading and unloading

38
Training Content
  • Injury Prevention
  • Contributing Risk Factors for MSDs
  • Safe Work Practices
  • Principles of Body Mechanics
  • Stretches and Exercise
  • The Baggage Handling Process
  • Proper Body Mechanics (task specific)

39
Functions to be Analyzed
  • Skycap
  • Ticket Counter
  • Gate Check-in
  • Baggage Make-up (T-point)
  • Planeside Loading and Unloading
  • Aircraft Cargo Compartments
  • Baggage Claim

40
Extended Reaching (unloading cart without shelf)
  • Brace oneself with an arm or leg
  • Slide load or pull load close to body before
    lifting
  • Stay in control of the load

41
Twisting while Lifting (unloading cart with shelf)
  • Angle cart to reduce degree of turn
  • Keep load directly in front of body
  • Step into the turn when turning body

42
One-handed Lifting (loading cart with shelf)
  • Use two-handed lift whenever possible
  • Keep load at waist height
  • Avoid lifting bags by handles

43
OSHA/Airline Industry Alliance
  • Future of the Alliance
  • Barry Brown
  • Southwest Airlines

44
Continue Work on Current Initiatives
  • eTool
  • continuous review update
  • add job functions
  • Baggage Handling Training Manual
  • further development of function specific
    training
  • expand to include other aviation-related
    operations
  • Interested Parties Process

45
Initiatives Being Considered for 2004
  • Airport Facilities Communication
  • Public/Customer Education
  • NATA/International Outreach
  • OSHA Alliance Website Enhancement

46
Acknowledgements
  • John Andrus Southwest
  • Bob Curtis OSHA
  • Kristi Dearing OSHA
  • Brently Donaldson OSHA
  • Greg George OSHA
  • Ann Giles AirTran
  • Travis Hannan OSHA
  • Dee Hinckley JetBlue
  • Lee Anne Jillings OSHA
  • Cindy Keiser Continental
  • Richard Lindsay American Airlines
  • Ray McCleary US Airways
  • Kim McDaniel Southwest
  • Richard Petriatis United
  • Penny Prince American Airlines
  • Tim Racicot Continental
  • Lisa Ramber OSHA
  • Christopher San Giovanni JetBlue
  • Hillary Schneider United
  • Kevin Summerlin Continental
  • Jim Swartz Delta Air Lines
  • Debra Vujasin US Airways
  • Terri Weiland Midwest Express
  • Ashley West Delta Air Lines
  • Bill Wright OSHA
  • Holly Zimmerman Alaska Airlines
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