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Curriculum as a Reconceptualized Field Pinar, Reynolds, Slattery, Taubman, 1995

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... interesting is how your life history, politics, gender, race, and theology have ... in linear, lock-step fashion, expelling unruly students: these ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Curriculum as a Reconceptualized Field Pinar, Reynolds, Slattery, Taubman, 1995


1
Curriculum as a Reconceptualized Field(Pinar,
Reynolds, Slattery, Taubman, 1995)
 What is interesting is how your life history,
politics, gender, race, and theology have come
together in complicated ways to make a
problematic situation. The field no longer sees
the problems of curriculum and teaching as
technical problems, that is, problems of how
to. The contemporary field regards the problems
of curriculum and teaching as why problems.
Such a view requires that we understand what was
before considered only something to be solved
conventional responses to problems of curriculum
and teaching have clearly failed to solve those
problems. Writing behavioural objectives,
evaluating with standardized tests, presenting
material in linear, lock-step fashion, expelling
unruly students these solutions have failed.
(p. 8)
2
How did we get there from here? (late 1960s)
  • Preoccupation with curriculum development
    1920-1980
  • During that period when the paradigm of
    curriculum development organized the field and
    the school curriculum represented the pay off
    of curriculum theory, theoretical positions were
    characterized as orientations to curriculum
    practice. (p. 20) 
  • There were several possible categorizations of
    orientations to (or conceptions of)
    curriculum (table on page 21)
  • these orientations have also been called
    traditional mappings of the curriculum field.
    Jackson (1992) notes, however, that they are of
    questionable value for the contemporary
    curriculum field.

3
Huebner (1966) lays the groundwork for
reconceptualist movement with his discussion of
five basic foci for curriculum language
  • Technical provides a means-ends rationality to
    curriculum discourse
  • Scientific attempts to maximize effectiveness
    and efficiency
  • Political focuses on power and control
  • Aesthetic focuses on teaching and learning as an
    art
  • Ethical examines the value of the educational act

Pinar (1978) has labeled as "reconceptualist"
those writers/researchers interested in that mode
of thinking that conceptualizes education anew
and privileges alternative modes of inquiry.
Hlynka, D. (1994). Handbook of Research in
Educational Technology Postmodernism. available
online http//www.umanitoba.ca/centres/ukrainian_
canadian/hlynka/papers/postmodernism.html
4
Nixon, G. (1999). Whatever Happened to
Heightened Consciousness'? Journal of Curriculum
Studies, 31(6), 625-633.
available online
http//members.shaw.ca/docnixon/pubs.highercs.html

Philosophers of education and theorists of
curriculum found themselves being to forced into
one of two camps Either they stood with those
who dreamed of heightening personal awareness in
an often metaphysical sense or they stood with
those who took expanded consciousness to refer to
waking up to the inequities and injustices
rampant in the sociopolitical system. It seemed
to be a choice between "heightened consciousness"
or "consciousness raising". The reconceptualist
movement which appeared at this time attempted to
draw these disparate voices into a unified
protest against the status quo.
5
A reconceptualized curriculum that (hopefully)
interrogates and deconstructs our partial
narratives,
  • Recognizes
  • subjectivity
  • the art of interpretation
  • the centrality of intentionality to understanding
    human action
  • the political (power relations, class conflicts,
    resistance, and the political nature of culture,
    meaning, knowledge)
  • (Giroux, 1981)

6
In Pinar, Reynolds, Slattery Taubman (1995,
2002), the chapter titles indicate what the
authors consider to be the present state of the
reconceptualized field. These include
  • Chapter 5 Understanding Curriculum as Political
    text
  • Chapter 6 Understanding Curriculum as Racial
    text
  • Chapter 7 Understanding Curriculum as Gender
    text
  • Chapter 8 Understanding Curriculum as
    Phenomenological text
  • Chapter 9 Understanding Curriculum as
    Poststructuralist, Deconstructed, Postmodern text
  • Chapter 10 Understanding Curriculum as
    Autobiographical/Biographical text
  • Chapter 11 Understanding Curriculum as Aesthetic
    text
  • Chapter 12 Understanding Curriculum as
    Theological text
  • Chapter 13 Understanding Curriculum as
    Institutionalized text
  • Chapter 14 Understanding Curriculum as
    International text
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