Navigating NSPS for Supervisors - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Navigating NSPS for Supervisors PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 92085-Y2UxN



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Navigating NSPS for Supervisors

Description:

Explain the human capital challenges facing DON in the coming decade. Identify the motivating factors behind DON's Human Capital Transformation. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:269
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 168
Provided by: ICF29
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Navigating NSPS for Supervisors


1
(No Transcript)
2
(No Transcript)
3
Navigating NSPS for Supervisors
  • Department of the Navy
  • Office of Civilian Human Resources
  • Civilian Workforce Development Division

0-1
4
Pre-Course Assessment
  • Please take the Pre-Course Benchmark Assessment.

0-2
5
(No Transcript)
6
(No Transcript)
7
(No Transcript)
8
(No Transcript)
9
Unit 1 DON Human Capital Transformation
1-1
10
Unit Objectives
  • Explain the human capital challenges facing DON
    in the coming decade.
  • Identify the motivating factors behind DONs
    Human Capital Transformation.
  • Explain how NSPS fits into the overall DON Human
    Capital Strategy and helps achieve Naval Power
    21, Sea Power 21, and Marine Corps Strategy 21.
  • List the existing DON and DoD references for
    human capital and NSPS guidance.

1-2
11
DoD Human Capital Challenges
  • The role of the Department of Defense is changing
    to confront new challenges
  • New types of enemies
  • Diffuse enemies
  • New capabilities
  • New defense concerns
  • Global war on terrorism
  • Need for rapid deployment and support (FORCEnet)

1-3
12
Changing Workforce
  • The Department of the Navys workforce is
    changing drastically
  • Personnel and related programs now comprise over
    70 of the DONs obligational authority.
  • Roles within DON are shifting from military to
    civilian.
  • Contractors are becoming more prominent in the
    workplace.

1-4
13
New Strategies for New Problems
  • Much of the General Schedule system for personnel
    management is not set up to manage an adaptive
    workforce.
  • Too specified, too restrictive, too complex
  • One-size-fits-all model
  • These challenges require a new strategy for the
    DoD and the DON, on both a deployment and
    personnel management level.
  • Mandated by the Presidents Management Agenda
    (2004)

1-5
14
DON Human Capital Strategy
  • The workforce must be improved by aligning
    personnel more effectively.
  • Supports achievement of Naval Power 21, Sea Power
    21, and Marine Corps Strategy 21 by optimizing
    workforce performance and management
  • Civilian Personnel Management must be transformed
    to meet these goals
  • The National Security Personnel System supports
    this transformation in civilian workforce
    alignment to the DON mission.

1-6
15
DON Human Capital Transformation
Enterprise approach to Civilian Workforce
Development
DON Human Capital Transformation
Defense Transformation
Act Acquisition
Workforce Personnel System
  • Uncertain Global Environment
  • Evolving Military Requirements
  • New Information Technologies
  • Successful HR Best Practices

1-7
16
Design Principles Operational Requirements
  • Key Performance Parameters
  • High Performing Employees/supervisors are
    compensated/retained based on performance/contribu
    tion to mission.
  • Agile Responsive Workforce can be easily
    sized, shaped, and deployed to meet changing
    mission requirements.
  • Credible and Trusted System assures openness,
    clarity, accountability, and adherence to merit
    principles
  • Fiscally Sound Aggregate increases in civilian
    payroll, at the appropriations level, will
    conform to OMB fiscal guidance managers will
    have flexibility to manage to budget.
  • Supporting Infrastructure Information technology
    support and training and change management plans
    are available and funded.
  • Schedule NSPS will be operational and
    demonstrate success prior to November 2009.
  • Guiding Principles
  • Put mission first support National Security
    goals and strategic objectives.
  • Respect the individual protect rights guaranteed
    by law.
  • Value talent, performance, leadership, and
    commitment to public service.
  • Be flexible, understandable, credible,
    responsive, executable.
  • Ensure accountability at all levels.
  • Balance HR interoperability with unique mission
    requirements.
  • Be competitive and cost effective.

1-8
17
National Security Personnel System
  • Human Resources System is based on a
    pay-for-performance principle.
  • Pay bands are used to chart employee earning
    potential.
  • Performance objectives are drafted and aligned to
    the organizations goals and mission to encourage
    greater cohesiveness.
  • Employees can actively chart their own career
    development.

1-9
18
National Security Personnel System Additional
Resources
  • DON Interim Guidance
  • NSPS Guides
  • DON Human Capital Strategy
  • NSPS Web Sources
  • NSPS Statute
  • Federal Registrar

1-10
19
Unit Objectives
  • Explain the human capital challenges facing DON
    in the coming decade.
  • Identify the motivating factors behind DONs
    Human Capital Transformation.
  • Explain how NSPS fits into the overall DON Human
    Capital Strategy and helps achieve Naval Power
    21, Sea Power 21, and Marine Corps Strategy 21.
  • List the existing DON and DoD references for
    human capital and NSPS guidance.

1-11
20
(No Transcript)
21
Unit 2 Conversion Overview
2-1
22
Unit Objectives
  • Describe the main rules governing NSPS and the
    new flexibilities afforded under NSPS.
  • Explain what does NOT change under NSPS.
  • Identify the core elements of NSPS.
  • Describe NSPS design elements.
  • Explain the NSPS conversion process.
  • Explain the potential of NSPS for helping achieve
    mission success.
  • Recognize the expanded role of supervisors in the
    operational framework of NSPS.
  • Recognize the need for a workforce that is
    engaged and committed to the organization through
    aligned vision and goals.

2-2
23
The Supervisors Role
  • NSPS Supervisor
  • Strategic Planning
  • Organizational strategic planning
  • Cascading goals and objectives
  • Aligning employee performance objectives with
    organizational goals
  • Compensation Management
  • Total compensation approach
  • Market competitiveness
  • Relation to pay for performance
  • Budgetary implications
  • Pay for Performance
  • Policy, guidance, and oversight
  • Pay Pool Management
  • Performance expectations
  • Assessment
  • Compensation Allotment

HELP WANTED
2-3
24
Would You Qualify? How Highly?
___ Needs Help ___Minimally Qualified
___Could Do ___Highly Qualified ___Perfect
Match 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . 5
2-4
25
NSPS Is Different!
  • Requires your active involvement
  • Communicate, communicate, communicate!
  • Supervisor wears many hats
  • Coach
  • Mentor
  • Teacher
  • Advisor
  • Collaborator
  • Managers/Supervisors participate as
  • Strategic Planning Partners
  • Compensation Review Board Chairperson/Members
  • Performance Review Authority Chairperson/Members
  • Pay Pool Manager
  • Pay Pool Panel Members
  • Rating Official

Does your team recognize you in these roles?
2-5
26
New Ways of Thinking
  • NSPS requires new skills and new ways of
    thinking
  • No longer are pay increases tied to longevity.
  • No longer do supervisors have little impact on
    their employees salary.
  • No longer is salary progression controlled by
    grades and steps.
  • No longer can job objectives be trivial and not
    linked to mission.
  • No longer can employees and supervisors get away
    with not communicating with one another.

2-6
27
Core Elements
  • Accountability
  • Employees are responsible for their career,
    performance
  • Performance and contributions pay off through
    salary increases and bonuses
  • Flexibility
  • Adaptable system allows management to put right
    people in right job at right time
  • Results
  • Employee contributes directly to organizational
    goals and mission

Flexibility Respond to mission changes Realign,
reorganize, and reshape the workforce Assign
work Set pay
Accountability Employee Supervisor Leadership
Results Attract and retain top talent Promote
high performance
2-7
28
NSPS The Vision
  • To implement a high-performing, efficient,
    understandable, and properly aligned human
    capital management system, which includes
  • Tools to help steer the workforce toward the
    organizations goals
  • A flexible human resources system
  • A labor relations system and new adverse actions
    and appeals processes (these latter components
    are on hold and have not been implemented), while
  • Reinforcing the commitment to preserve
    fundamental merit principles, to prevent
    prohibited personnel practices, and to honor and
    promote veterans preference.

2-8
29
NSPS What Will It Do for You?
  • Through NSPS, DoD will be better able to
  • Align its human resources system with mission
    objectives
  • Compete for high-quality talent
  • Establish a more rigorous tie between performance
    and monetary rewards
  • Reward outstanding performers
  • Size and shape its workforce to meet mission
    needs
  • Respond to new business and strategic needs
  • Use the active duty force by making it easier to
    employ civilians in jobs filled by military
  • Reduce administrative burden.

2-9
30
NSPS Design Elements
CLASSIFICATION Simple Flexible Streamlined
COMPENSATION Performance based Market
driven Mission responsive
WORKFORCE SHAPING Mission responsive Less
disruptive Performance focused
An Integrated System
PERFORMANCEMANAGEMENT Results oriented Mission
focused
STAFFING Increased flexibilities Streamlined
process Adaptable Right person in the right
job at the right time
2-10
31
Human Resources System
  • ClassificationSimple, flexible
  • StaffingThe right person, in the right place, at
    the right time
  • CompensationPay-for-performance,
    market-sensitive
  • Performance ManagementLinked to agency mission
  • Workforce ShapingStreamlined, mission-responsive
  • Adverse Actions/Appeals
  • Enjoined
  • Title V, Chapter 75 Adverse Action process
    available
  • Labor Relations System
  • Enjoined
  • Title V, Chapter 71 rules apply to NSPS
    implementation for bargaining unit employees

2-11
32
What Doesnt Change?
  • Merit System Principles
  • Rules against prohibited personnel practices
  • Whistleblower protection
  • Veterans Preference
  • Benefits (retirement, health, life, etc.)
  • Anti-discrimination laws
  • Fundamental due process
  • Allowances and travel/subsistence expenses
  • Training
  • Leave and work schedules
  • Other personnel systems in law
  • Demonstration projects (until FY 09)
  • Title V incentive awards (Special Act,
    On-the-Spot)

2-12
33
Conversion to NSPS Grade-Based, No Loss of Pay
Standard Career Group Professional / Analytical
(YA)
Plus Local Market Supplement
(GS-14 to GS-15)
Pay Band 3 75,879 - 127,031
(GS-9 to GS-13)
Pay Band 2 38,824 - 87,039
Pay Band 1 25,623 - 61,068
(GS-5 to GS-11)
Contract Specialist, GS-1102-9 w/potential to
GS-12
Contract Specialist, GS-1102-12 full performance
level
2-13
34
Within-Grade Increase (WGI) Buy-In
  • Under NSPS, all employees currently eligible for
    a within-grade increase will have their pay
    adjusted to include a one-time pay increase (WGI
    buy-in) that covers the period between the last
    WGI date and the date of conversion to NSPS.
  • WGI buy-in will appear in the first paycheck
    after conversion and reflect that pay period's
    portion of the WGI buy-in.

2-14
35
Leadership Challenges Conversion
  • Change management
  • Business rules are necessary in areas where
    decisions are now required
  • Such as who can hire and make pay decisions under
    NSPS
  • Realignments can impact NSPS actions
  • Conversion issues
  • Ongoing potential impact
  • Reengineer current process to take advantage of
    NSPS
  • Financial issues need to be considered as a key
    part of workforce structure decisions
  • Market Rates, Budget Impact
  • Transition trauma
  • GS-11 supervisors
  • GS-14 supervisors
  • Leader positions

2-15
36
Unit Objectives
  • Describe the main rules governing NSPS and the
    new flexibilities afforded under NSPS.
  • Explain what does NOT change under NSPS.
  • Describe the core elements of NSPS.
  • Describe NSPS design elements.
  • Explain the NSPS conversion process.
  • Explain the potential of NSPS for helping achieve
    mission success.
  • Recognize the expanded role of managers and
    supervisors in the operational framework of NSPS.
  • Recognize the need for a workforce that is
    engaged and committed to the organization through
    aligned vision and goals.

2-16
37
Unit 3 NSPS Fundamentals
3-1
38
Unit Objectives
  • Describe what has changed and what has stayed the
    same under NSPS in the areas of classification,
    compensation, and staffing and recruitment.
  • Explain new roles and what is required.
  • Identify challenges and how to negotiate them.
  • Know when to ask for help from Human Resources
    staff.

3-2
39
NSPS Major Design Elements
CLASSIFICATION Simple Flexible Streamlined
COMPENSATION Performance based Market
driven Mission responsive
WORKFORCE SHAPING Mission responsive Less
disruptive Performance focused
An Integrated System
PERFORMANCEMANAGEMENT Results oriented Mission
focused
STAFFING Increased flexibilities Streamlined
process Adaptable Right person in the right
job at the right time
3-3
2-10
40
Supervisor Classification Responsibilities
  • Supervisors must
  • Assign duties, responsibilities, and authorities
    to positions to align to mission
  • Balance economy, effectiveness, productivity,
    skill use, and employee motivation and
    development, while conforming with purpose of
    position
  • Consider classification impact on other positions
    in their organization when assigning duties
  • Document classification decisions in accordance
    with DON and DoD standards.

3-4
41
Classification Changes
  • General Schedule
  • 15 different grades, and several different
    classification methods
  • 10 steps in each grade
  • One-grade and two-grade work combined in a
    single schedule
  • Many and detailed classification standards
  • Specific position descriptions
  • Movement from grade to grade normally requires
    competition
  • NSPS
  • Four career groups, with pay schedules, cover all
    GS jobs
  • Jobs in broad pay bands based upon nature of
    work
  • Fewer, more generic PDs simplified standards
  • Greater flexibility in assigning new or different
    work
  • Promotes broader skill development and career
    opportunities within pay bands

3-5
42
Classification Architecture
Simplified and Flexible
3-6
43
Career Groups
3-7
44
(No Transcript)
45
(No Transcript)
46
(No Transcript)
47
(No Transcript)
48
(No Transcript)
49
(No Transcript)
50
(No Transcript)
51
(No Transcript)
52
(No Transcript)
53
(No Transcript)
54
Career Group Compensation
  • Standard Career Group
  • Logistics Management Specialists
  • Contract Specialists
  • Budget Analysts
  • Science Engineering
  • Chemists
  • Physicists
  • Electronics Engineers
  • Investigative Protective
  • Criminal Investigators
  • Firefighters
  • Security Guards
  • Medical
  • Physicians
  • Dentists
  • Pharmacist

Budget Analyst, YA-560-2
Title
Pay Schedule Occ Code
Pay Band Level
3-8
55
Levels of Duties and Responsibilities by Pay Band
Standard Career Group Professional/Analytical Pay
Schedule YA (nonsupervisory)
Band 3 Senior Expert
Band 2 Full Performance Level
Band 1 - Entry/Developmental
3-9
56
Classification Select Group/Schedule
  • Determine career group and pay schedule based on
    occupation.
  • The class standards have specific requirements
    and/or limitations regarding their use.
  • Occupations occur in only one career group and
    pay schedule.

3-10
57
Classification Select Pay Band
  • Determine career group and pay schedule based on
    occupation.
  • The class standards have specific requirements
    and/or limitations regarding their use.
  • Occupations occur in only one career group and
    pay schedule.

3-11
58
(No Transcript)
59
(No Transcript)
60
(No Transcript)
61
(No Transcript)
62
(No Transcript)
63
(No Transcript)
64
Entry Level Pay Band 1
  • Developmental (intern) positions only
  • If no continuing work at this level, will be
    promoted to Pay Band 2

3-12
65
Full Performance Level Pay Band 2
Journey Level Pay Band 2
  • Experienced worker who has passed the Pay Band 1
    trainee-level work
  • May serve as subject matter expert
  • Scope of the work is typically action officer
    work rather than big picture

3-13
66
Expert Level Pay Band 3
Journey Level Pay Band 2
  • Serves as program/project manager or subject
    matter expert
  • Scope of the work is typically the big picture
    rather than action officer work
  • Programs are usually located in Component/Command
    headquarters and are carried out in multiple
    installations and/or regions
  • Typically found at HQ and/or activity level that
    has component-level responsibility.

3-14
67
Classification Appeals
  • Employees may appeal
  • Any classification decision relating to their own
    position
  • Title
  • Occupational code
  • Pay band
  • Supervisory status
  • Employees may not appeal
  • Classification of a proposed position or one to
    which the employee is not officially assigned
  • Classification of a position to which an employee
    is detailed or temporarily promoted
  • Accuracy, consistency, or use of NSPS
    classification criteria
  • Rate of pay.

3-15
68
Challenges to Classification
  • Managers and Supervisors
  • Review NSPS classification changes
  • GS-14 supervisory position placement
  • GS-13 manager position placement
  • Developmental positions
  • Analyze position management structure
  • Identify position changes and notify employees
  • Assume and/or delegate classification authority
  • Learn changes to classification principles
  • Familiarize employees with new position
    descriptions

3-16
69
Classification Review
  • NSPS classification is simple and streamlined
  • Occupational definitions
  • Structure ? career groups, pay schedules, pay
    bands
  • Classification of NSPS positions
  • Classification of mixed, interdisciplinary, and
    interoccupational positions
  • Classification appeals
  • Questions?

3-17
70
Compensation Architecture
  • Career Groups
  • Standard Career Group
  • Engineering and Scientific Career Group
  • Medical Career Group
  • Investigative and Protective Services Career
    Group
  • Pay Schedules
  • Professional and Analytical
  • Technician/Support
  • Supervisory
  • Pay Bands
  • Entry
  • Journey (Full Performance)
  • Expert

3-18
71
Pay Banding Standard Career Group
3-19
72
NSPS Content Salary Management
Market-Based Pay (Notional Vision)
Market Tool Benchmarks
Market
Position Description
Industry
Size
YA-201-PB2Service Delivery ERField-Industrial
Market Point
Pay Band 2 38,175 to 85,578
25 60 75 Leader Other
Position Market Range
10
60
90
59,000
65,000
50,000
Market Point
3-20
73
New Employee Pay Setting Exercise
  • Take the next 15 minutes to review the handout
    titled New Hire Pay Setting Exercise.
  • Answer the questions associated with the
    exercise.
  • Think about defending your rationale.
  • What might make you change your mind?
  • If you were a pay pool review panel member, what
    questions might you ask about this decision?
  • Process your answers with the class (30 minutes).

3-21
74
(No Transcript)
75
(No Transcript)
76
(No Transcript)
77
(No Transcript)
78
(No Transcript)
79
(No Transcript)
80
Compensation
  • Reassignment
  • Discretionary 5 increase
  • Reduction in band
  • Discretionary 5 increase
  • First Assignment
  • Anywhere in pay band
  • Promotion
  • Minimum 6 or bottom of pay band
  • Maximum 20

3-22
81
Compensation
Standard Career Group Professional / Analytical
(YA)
Between Pay BandsPromotion 6 to 20
Rate Range Adjustmentsminimum or maximum or
both
Pay Band 3
Pay Band 2
Plus Local Market Supplement
Pay Band 1
  • Within Band Pay Adjustments
  • Performance-based Pay
  • Discretionary Performance Payouts
  • Extraordinary Pay Increase (EPI)
  • Organizational/Team Achievement Recognition
    (OAR)
  • ReassignmentUp to 5
  • Accelerated Compensation for Developmental
    Positions (ACDP)only in Pay Band 1 of YA, YD ,
    YH , and YK pay schedules generally shall not
    exceed 20 awarded at any time

3-23
82
Compensation Update
  • DON NSPS Compensation Vision
  • Market Based, Performance Driven
  • DoD Compensation Working Group
  • Managers Interim Guidance for EstablishingPay
    for Employees in NSPS
  • DON Pay Pool Consultancy

3-24
83
Reassignment Pay Setting Exercise
  • Take 15 minutes to review and complete the Pay
    Setting Exercise.
  • Review the New Employee Pay Setting Exercise
    completed earlier in the course.
  • Answer questions.
  • Are there certain points where you could have
    just as easily made a different decision?
  • Process your answers with the rest of the class
    (30 minutes).

3-25
84
(No Transcript)
85
(No Transcript)
86
(No Transcript)
87
(No Transcript)
88
Challenges to Compensation
  • Supervisors
  • Establish command compensation board
  • Serve as chairperson/member
  • Determine command compensation philosophy
    consistent with DON/DoD guidance
  • Prepare an assessment process to ensure
    consistent pay setting and compensation
    management
  • Review budgets in light of new overtime
    provisions
  • Determine approach for use of accelerated
    compensation for developmental pay for intern and
    trainee positions.

3-26
89
Staffing and Recruitment What Stays the Same
  • Affirmative Action
  • Merit Principles
  • Rules against prohibitive personnel practices
  • Veterans preference
  • EEO/anti-discrimination laws

3-27
90
Staffing and Recruitment New Flexibilities
  • Special appointing authorities
  • Severe shortage
  • Critical hiring
  • DoD approval required
  • Priority placement plan applied differently
  • Modified public notice requirements
  • May limit consideration to local commuting area
    or other targeted recruitment sources
  • Category rating
  • Selection certificate expiration 30 days
    w/30-day extension
  • Probationary periods can be longer than one-year
    limit, w//DoD approval
  • Time-in-grade requirement eliminated
  • NOTE These changes all have a context in which
    they apply. Consult your HRO/ HRSC for proper
    application of staffing changes.

3-28
91
Alternative Forms of Competition
  • Alternate Certification
  • By-name request
  • Candidate must meet criteria of highest group
  • Exceptional Performance Promotion
  • Requires Level 5 performance rating
  • Same occupational series and function
  • Assessment Boards
  • Pre-established criteria, ranked specific to the
    occupation
  • Selection unique to actual vacancy

Cultural Change These options represent a
significant change from current practice. Care
should be taken to ensure that employees
understand these options if they are to be used
effectively.
3-29
92
Competitive vs. Non-Competitive Placements
  • Competitive
  • Merit Principles
  • Exceptional Performance Promotion
  • Alternate Certification
  • Assessment Boards
  • Reassignments
  • Temporary Promotions
  • Denotes competitive or noncompetitive actions
  • Non-Competitive
  • Career-Ladder Promotions
  • Reassignments
  • Additional Duties and Responsibilities
    (Accretion)
  • Temporary Promotions
  • Higher Pay Band New Classification Issuance
  • Classification Correction
  • Position Change Due to RIF

3-30
93
Rules for Standard Career Group
Cultural Change Noncompetitive reassignments
within a band, and between bands, can occur in
cases where competitive promotion rules are used
in the General Schedule system. Employees need to
be fully informed of the use of this flexibility.
Merit Systems Principles and Equal Employment
Opportunity requirements still apply.
3-31
94
Challenges to Staffing
  • Delegation of Hiring Authority
  • Advertised vacancies
  • Processing time
  • Pay adjustment business rules
  • Employee movement
  • NOTE Review of current directives, duty rosters,
    employee entitlements, and benefits such as
    reserved parking and Recreation Club fees to
    adjust for new pay bands

3-32
95
Unit Objectives
  • Describe what has changed and what has stayed the
    same under NSPS in the areas of Classification,
    and Compensation, and Staffing and Recruitment.
  • Explain their new roles and what is required.
  • Indentify challenges and how to negotiate them.
  • Know when to ask for help from Human Resources
    staff.

3-33
96
(No Transcript)
97
Unit 4 Performance Management
4-1
98
Unit Objectives
  • Identify and explain the basic elements of the
    performance management system.
  • Identify the criteria and methods for developing
    and evaluating job objectives.
  • Acknowledge that the supervisors role has not
    changed, although its impact has.
  • Describe NSPS performance management elements and
    how they are used in the rating process.
  • Explain when performance plans can and should be
    adjusted.
  • Explain importance of closeout assessments and
    when they are to be conducted.
  • Identify how automated tools are used in planning
    and monitoring performance and explain how to
    access those tools.
  • Describe steps for dealing with performance
    deficiencies.
  • Identify opportunities for developing or
    enhancing performance.
  • Explain importance of continuous feedback.
  • Describe the purpose of the interim review and
    factors considered at review.

4-2
99
Your Role as a Supervisor
  • Conversation 1
  • Performance Plan
  • Establish expectations
  • Work with employee to draft job objectives for
    current (new) rating cycle
  • Develop a written performance plan
  • Review Contributing Factors and relevant
    Performance Indicators
  • Identify developmental needs
  • Obtain higher-level approval
  • Provide a basis for ongoing dialogue about
    performance
  • Conversation 3 OPTIONAL
  • End-of-Cycle Review
  • End of rating cycle.
  • Needs to be a separate conversation from the
    Annual Appraisal
  • Review employees self-assessment
  • Review employees Results, Performance
    Indicators, and Contributing Factors
  • Conversation 2
  • Interim Review(s)
  • Required at least once during the performance
    management cycle
  • Meet with employees, check on progress towards
    objectives, make necessary adjustments
  • Must be documented in the Performance Appraisal
    Tool
  • Conversation 4
  • Annual Appraisal
  • Three months after the end of the rating cycle.
  • Communicate pay pool decisions.

4-3
100
(No Transcript)
101
(No Transcript)
102
(No Transcript)
103
(No Transcript)
104
Performance Management System
  • Performance Management System
  • Designed to
  • Foster high-performing culture
  • Encourage employee engagement and robust
    communication
  • Enhance overall effectiveness of organization.
  • Supervisors work with employees to establish
    performance goals and expectations, aligned with
    mission-related goals.
  • System encourages ongoing feedback and
    communication between supervisor and employees.
  • System recognizes conduct (behavior, professional
    demeanor) as an element of performance.

4-4
105
Performance Management Cycle
  • Four Phases
  • Plan
  • Supervisor and/or Rating Official and employee
    develop performance plan.
  • Monitor and Develop
  • Supervisor and/or Rating Official and employee
    have ongoing dialogue about performance,
    training, and growth opportunities to address
    gaps or additional expectations.
  • Assess
  • A two-step process to determine levels of
    accomplishment
  • Official recommends rating and share allocation
  • Pay Pool Manager determines final rating of
    record and share allocation
  • Reward
  • Increase base salary and/or authorize one-time
    lump sum payment in recognition of contributions
    to mission.

4-5
106
NSPS Online Tools
  • Performance Appraisal Application (PAA)
  • Tool that supports the NSPS performance
    management system
  • Streamlines and automates performance management
    processes and documentation requirements
  • Makes it easier and more efficient to track and
    monitor performance
  • Compensation Workbench (CWB)
  • Pay pool assessment and payout
  • My Biz (Employees and Supervisors)
  • Online access to view information from official
    personnel records
  • Provides access to the Performance Appraisal
    Application (PAA)
  • My Workplace (Supervisors)
  • Provides access to employee information and PAA
  • Military supervisors must complete a User Account
    Request Form
  • Self-Service Hierarchy (SSH)
  • Mandatory for supervisory/rating official access
    to the PAA
  • User Account Request Forms must be submitted to
    HRO

4-6
107
Timeline
The NSPS Performance Cycle 1 Oct-30 Sep
90day Requirement
Monitor and Develop
Oct
Jan
Sep
Jun
Jul
Reward
Assess
Plan
A 12-month performance cycle A 16-month
process
( varies during conversion to NSPS)
4-7
108
(No Transcript)
109
(No Transcript)
110
(No Transcript)
111
(No Transcript)
112
(No Transcript)
113
(No Transcript)
114
(No Transcript)
115
(No Transcript)
116
Phase 1 Planning Performance
  • Identify strategic goal to which objectives
    align.
  • Identify work to be accomplished.
  • Identify desired outcomes
  • Identify how outcomes will be measured.
  • Consider performance indicators.
  • Establish a written performance plan
  • Identify and develop objectives
  • Select contributing factor(s)
  • Establish weighting (if any)
  • Obtain higher-level review and approval of plan.
  • Communicate the written performance plan.

4-8
117
Align Work to Mission
  • Leaders define the organizations mission and
    strategic goals
  • Cascaded to the work unit and employee objectives
  • Can also align work horizontally
  • Objectives must draw a line of sight between the
    employees work, the work units goals, and the
    organizations success
  • When work is aligned to the mission, from any
    perspective you choose, everyone is working
    together towards shared goals

4-9
118
Alignment and Outcomes
  • Which of your organizational goals does your work
    support?
  • Ensure that the goal selected is from the
    appropriate level of the organization (i.e., team
    or division, not agency or command).
  • What are the desired results of the work that
    align to your organizational goals?
  • Ensure that your objectives contain an expected
    outcome.

4-10
119
(No Transcript)
120
(No Transcript)
121
(No Transcript)
122
(No Transcript)
123
(No Transcript)
124
(No Transcript)
125
(No Transcript)
126
(No Transcript)
127
(No Transcript)
128
(No Transcript)
129
(No Transcript)
130
(No Transcript)
131
(No Transcript)
132
(No Transcript)
133
(No Transcript)
134
(No Transcript)
135
Identify Outcome Measures
  • Establish time requirements (absolute standard)
  • What are the milestones for completion of this
    objective?
  • Provide measurement criteria
  • What metrics will be used to evaluate this
    outcome?
  • Objectives must have assess-ability
  • Measurement does not have to be numeric.
  • Measurement can be objective, subjective,
    quantitative, or qualitative, as long as the
    parties agree to the metric. Ask
  • How will I/we know success when I/we see it?

4-11
136
Performance Indicators
  • What Are Performance Indicators?
  • Applied in the rating of job objectives
  • Describe levels or thresholds of performance
  • Standardized across the DoD
  • Arranged by pay schedule and pay band
  • Defined benchmarks at Level 3 and Level 5
    performance

4-12
137
Performance Indicator Example
4-13
138
Objectives vs. Task Descriptions
Objectives are not task lists!
Suggestion Work being identified for
measurement in an objective should be
foreseeable, substantial, and significant in
scope, duration, and effect.
4-14
139
(No Transcript)
140
(No Transcript)
141
(No Transcript)
142
(No Transcript)
143
(No Transcript)
144
(No Transcript)
145
Use of SMART
  • SMART is one method for developing (and
    evaluating) job objectives
  • Specific
  • Measurable
  • Aligned
  • Realistic/Relevant
  • Timed

4-15
146
Some Pitfalls of SMART
  • Using SMART by itself does not guarantee
    objectives that are useful to the employee, the
    rating official, or the pay pool panel.
  • SMART may not be the best method for writing
    objectives for individuals who do non-repetitive
    work or have responsibilities that are primarily
    knowledge-based
  • Either way, SMART objectives are only one part of
    the performance management equation. Other key
    elements include
  • Line of sight to organizational goals
  • Performance indicators
  • Contributing factors

4-16
147
Common Errors of Writing Objectives
  • The objective does not clearly align to an
    organizational goal.
  • Organizational goal(s) selected are from too high
    a level within the organization.
  • The objective is vague.
  • The objective is not measurable or verifiable.
  • The objective is too complex or lengthy.
  • The objective is not tied to a timeline.
  • The objective places emphasis on inappropriate
    aspects of the work.
  • The employee has too many objectives.

4-17
148
Requirements for Performance Plans
An objective is a description of a future
situation
DON Performance Management Interim Guidance,
Section 6., a.
4-18
149
Evaluating Performance Objectives
  • Is the outcome clearly identified?
  • Is the objective measurable or quantifiable?
  • Remember Everything is measurable in some way,
    shape, or form.
  • Is the objective recognizably aligned to the
    correct organizational goal for the rating cycle?
  • How does achieving the objective lead to or
    assist in accomplishing the organizations
    mission?
  • Does the objective establish time requirements?

4-19
150
Contributing Factors
Contributing factors describe the manner in which
the job objectives were achieved (the how as
compared to the what of job objectives) by
assessing work behaviors.
  • At least one contributing factor must be selected
    for each job objective
  • Attributes of job performance that are
    significant to the accomplishment of individual
    job objectives
  • Further defined by work behaviors and
    benchmark descriptors
  • Described in the benchmark descriptions at the
    expected and enhanced level
  • Standard across DoD

4-20
151
Contributing Factors Benchmark Example
4-21
152
Selecting Contributing Factors
For Supervisor For Employee
4-22
153
Weighting Objectives
  • Job objectives are not required to be weighted,
    but not doing so means that they will all be
    weighted equally.
  • Weight should be established at the start of the
    rating cycle when the objectives are established
    and contributing factors identified weighting
    should be adjusted as needed if anything changes
    during the rating cycle.
  • Guidance states
  • Job objectives must be in no less than 5-percent
    increments
  • No objective can be weighted less than 10 percent
  • Total weight must equal 100 percent
  • If an objective is not rated (NR), the weight of
    that objective must be redistributed among the
    other objectives.

DON Performance Management Interim Guidance
Section 6., b., (4)
4-23
154
Supervisory Job Objectives
  • Mandatory supervisory job objectives must cover
  • Communicating performance expectations and
    holding employees responsible for accomplishing
    them
  • Making meaningful distinctions among employees
    based on performance and contribution to meeting
    organizational goals
  • Fostering and rewarding excellent performance
  • Addressing poor performance
  • Ensuring that employees are assigned a rating of
    record when implementing issuances require
  • Adhering to laws and regulations governing
    merit-systems principles, prohibited personnel
    practices, and equal employment opportunity.

DON Performance Management Interim Guidance
Section 6., b., (6)
4-24
155
Effect on Rating
ContributingFactor
DON Performance Management Interim Guidance
Section 12., b.
4-25
156
The Performance Plan Conversation
4-26
157
Phase 2 Monitoring and Developing Performance
  • Supervisors must monitor the performance of
    employees regularly.
  • Supervisors must also provide feedback that is
  • Specific
  • Fair
  • Accurate
  • Timely (addresses recent performance)
  • Helpful to employees in accomplishing jobs
    according to job objectives and performance
    expectations.

4-27
158
Timely and Specific Feedback Should Be Part of
Interaction
  • Routine meetings
  • Memos
  • E-mail, voice mail
  • Open-door policy
  • Short notes or letters
  • Daily dialogue

4-28
159
Feedback Loop Exercise
Scenario 1 Jane joined your team six weeks ago.
She has been regularly contributing ideas in
staff meetings.
Scenario 2 Dawn has been part of your team for
two years. You know that she is seeking more
responsibility. Lately, you have noticed that her
reports contain more misspellings than usual. You
mentioned it to her in passing the week before,
but the number of misspellings does not appear to
be back to Dawns normal, more acceptable level.
4-29
160
Monitoring to Develop Performance
  • Options
  • Meaningful performance-related discussion
  • Classroom training
  • Participation in process-improvement teams
  • Details and reassignments
  • Review and update Individual Development Plans
  • Mentoring and coaching
  • Motivate and inspire
  • Align employees core values with the mission of
    the organization
  • Help high performers to work with and encourage
    low performers
  • Provide informal mentorship
  • Ensure contribution to team
  • Promote a high-performing organization most
    employees want to do a good job
  • How can you help make that happen?

4-30
161
Addressing Performance Deficiencies
  • Options
  • Mentoring and Coaching
  • Remedial training
  • Reassignment
  • Performance Improvement Plan
  • Letter of counseling
  • Verbal or written warning
  • Written reprimand
  • Adverse action

Escalating
4-31
162
Developing Performance Not Just the
Supervisors Job
  • Delegating responsibility and ownership
  • Determine who is accountable for what outcomes
  • Show employee that he/she is trusted to
    accomplish work
  • Hold employee accountable for communication
  • Employee engagement
  • Keep employees individual goals, skills in mind

4-32
163
Interim Review
  • One of three required performance management
    events
  • Conduct and document at least once midway through
    appraisal period.
  • Emphasize performance strengths.
  • Focus on future performance.
  • Review performance plan and adjust if there are
    significant changes to work or organizational
    goals.
  • Document specific conduct concerns here.

4-33
164
Prepare and Participate Interim Review Exercise
  • Participants will receive a performance plan and
    some information regarding an employees
    performance.
  • Participants will take 15 minutes to prepare for
    interim review with employee.
  • Participants will spend 15 minutes delivering the
    review and discussing the results.
  • Participants will change roles so that each has a
    chance to be supervisor.

4-34
165
(No Transcript)
166
(No Transcript)
167
4-32
168
(No Transcript)
169
4-32
170
(No Transcript)
171
Adjusting Job Objectives
  • Job objectives may be adjusted (modified, added,
    or deleted) as needed during the performance
    cycle.
  • Supervisors will discuss adjustments and
    expectations with employees.
  • When new objectives are assigned, job objectives
    must communicate that portion of a major
    performance expectation that can be accomplished
    within the time remaining in the appraisal
    period.

DON Performance Management Interim Guidance
Section 6., b., (5)
4-35
172
Unit Objectives
  • Identify and explain the basic elements of the
    performance management system.
  • Identify the criteria and methods for developing
    and evaluating job objectives.
  • Acknowledge that the supervisors role has not
    changed, although its impact has.
  • Describe NSPS performance management elements and
    how they are used in the rating process.
  • Explain when performance plans can and should be
    adjusted.
  • Explain importance of closeout assessments and
    when they are to be conducted.
  • Identify how automated tools are used in planning
    and monitoring performance and explain how to
    access those tools.
  • Describe steps for dealing with performance
    deficiencies.
  • Identify opportunities for developing and
    enhancing performance.
  • Explain importance of continuous feedback.
  • Describe the purpose of the interim review and
    factors considered at review.

4-36
173
Unit 5 Rewarding Performance
5-1
174
Unit Objectives
  • Describe the method of conducting a performance
    management review.
  • Identify how NSPS performance management elements
    are used in the rating process.
  • Explain the difference between end-of-cycle
    review and annual appraisal.
  • Describe the impact of rating determination on
    eligibility for Pay Pool share distribution.
  • Identify and explain the Pay Pool process.
  • Describe the typical composition of Pay Pools and
    Pay Pool panels.
  • Describe types of performance payouts available
    to employees.
  • Describe the reconsideration process and
    timeframes required to appeal a rating decision.

5-2
175
Unit References
  • DON Performance Management, Interim Guidance,
    Version 1 April 2006
  • Title XI, U.S.C. Chapter 99
  • 5 CFR Chapter XCIX and Part 9901
  • DoD 1400.25-M, DoD Civilian Personnel Manual,
    Subchapter 1940, Performance Management
  • DoD 1400.25-M, DoD Civilian Personnel Manual,
    Subchapter 1930, Compensation Architecture Pay
    Policy

5-3
176
Key Compensation Changes
  • Prior to NSPS
  • Performance objectives
  • Varied cycles
  • Scale two ratings
  • Acceptable
  • Unacceptable
  • Typical rating acceptable
  • 120 day minimum rating period
  • Senior rater approves
  • Variable pay retention timeframes
  • Overtime rates based on grade-step
  • NSPS
  • Job objectives
  • One cycle (1 Oct 30 Sep)
  • Scale 1 (unacceptable) through 5 (role model)
  • Typical rating 3 (valued performer)
  • 90-day minimum rating period
  • Pay Pool Manager approves
  • Pay retention 2 year limit
  • Overtime rate YA-2s (former non-supervisory
    GS-9s through GS-13s) 1.5x regular rate

5-4
177
Lessons Learned
  • Rating and compensation decisions are tied to
    business rules.
  • Many business rules are established at
    organizational level.
  • Documentation is vital.
  • Begin implementation planning and Pay Pool
    strategies early.
  • Communicate!

5-5
178
Compensation Processes
  • Two interwoven simultaneous processes
  • Performance Management
  • Pay Pool

5-6
179
Performance Management and Compensation Exercise
  • Divide into groups.
  • Use flip chart sheet, sticky notes, and markers.
  • Place and arrange performance management terms
    according to who you believe should assume
    responsibility for each and in order of its
    occurrence in the cycle be prepared to discuss.
  • Terms may be used multiple times as required.

5-7
180
Roles Whos Involved
5-8
181
Assess, Rate, and Reward
  • Conclusion of rating cycle (Sep 30)
  • Employees complete self-assessments (by 31 Oct)
  • Assessment and Rating (1-17 Nov)
  • Pay Pool Panels meet reconcile ratings
    (Nov-Dec)
  • Pay Pool Manager approves Rating of Record and
    payout
  • Supervisors notify employees of Rating of Record
    (Annual Appraisal) (Dec-Jan)
  • Payout first full pay period (Jan)

Oct
Jan
Sep
Payout
Rating
Panels
5-9
182
Compensation Rules
  • 90-day minimum performance appraisal period
  • Extensions in special circumstances
  • Closeout assessments supervisor or employee
    changing position
  • Early annual recommended rating manager or
    employee leaves position within 90-days of end of
    cycle
  • Special purpose rating documents performance
    improvements from Level 1

5-10
183
End-of-Cycle Review
  • Supervisor/Rating Official
  • Evaluates employee performance
  • Completes performance appraisal
  • Submits recommended rating
  • Notifies employee of final rating or record,
    number of shares and payout distribution
  • Employee
  • Completes and submits self-assessment
  • Discusses performance with manager/supervisor
  • Suggests improvements to increase performance
  • Understands link between demonstrated
    performance, its value to organization, and
    compensation received

5-11
184
Performance Criteria
  • Assess by performance level and pay band
  • Assess levels of
  • Effort
  • Complexity
  • Achievement
  • Quality of outcome
  • Independence
  • Level of skill and expertise
  • Motivation and modeling behavior of role model
    employees

5-12
185
End-of-Cycle Review Meeting
  • Start with employee self-assessment
  • Prepare agenda and questions
  • Meet with employee review self-assessment
  • Ask questions
  • Clarify understanding of accomplishments and
    contributions
  • Note specific employee accomplishments
  • To be cited in narrative of supervisory
    assessment

5-13
186
Assessment Reporting
  • Narrative assessing/describing employee
  • Accomplishments/contributions to
    organization/team
  • Relative to their Performance Plan
  • Prepare by considering
  • Employees self-assessment
  • Purpose/work of organization
  • Contribution to organization or team
  • Closeout assessments from other supervisors
  • Rating process
  • Outcome
  • Recommended rating, share, and payout

5-14
187
Assessment andRating Lessons Learned
  • Address each objective individually.
  • Identify objective by name, e.g., Special
    Projects.
  • Document how results met, did not meet, or
    exceeded performance expectations.
  • Rate only solid results at Level 3 Valued
    Performer.
  • Rate results above or below Level 3 when
    warranted.

5-15
188
Rating Levels
Standard rating levels used in DoD
Important Maintain copies to support all rating
decisions!
5-16
189
Rating Methodology
  • Performance review assesses
  • What employee accomplished
  • Output rated on scale of 1 to 5
  • How employee accomplished it
  • Contributing factors influencing accomplishment
    of objective rated on scale of 1, -1, or 0

5-17
190
Performance Indicators
  • Pay Schedule
  • Pay Band
  • Benchmark Descriptors at Level 3 and 5

5-18
191
Contributing Factors
  • Contributing Factors How
  • One to three selected for each objective
  • Can influence objectives by 1, -1, or 0
  • Attributes of job performance that are
    significant to the accomplishment of individual
    job objectives
  • Further defined by work behaviors and
    benchmark descriptors
  • Standard across DoD
  • Described at the Expected and Enhanced level

5-19
192
Rating Methodology Diagram
3
50
x
x
x
x
x
x
5-20
193
Rating Methodology Diagram
5-21
194
Weighting and Rounding
  • Weight the adjusted ratings
  • Job objectives must be in no less than 5-percent
    increments.
  • No objective can be weighted less than 10
    percent.
  • Total weight must equal 100 percent.
  • If an objective is not rated (NR), the weight of
    that objective must be re-distributed among the
    other objectives.
  • Total the results.
  • Round the result.

5-22
195
Share Ranges
  • Shares in the Pay Pool are awarded as shown in
    the table
  • Share ranges allow further distinction between
    levels of contribution.
  • The estimated value of a share reflects a
    percentage of salary (the actual share value will
    not be known until the Pay Pool Panel completes
    its work).

5-23
196
Higher-Level Reviewer
  • The higher-level reviewer may change the rating
    officials recommendations.
  • The Pay Pool Panel may change the rating
    officials recommendations.
  • NO rating is final until approved by the Pay Pool
    Manager and/or Performance Review Authority.
  • Recommendations are not to be shared with
    employees until rating finalized by Pay Pool
    Manager.

5-24
197
Pay Pool Basics
  • What is a Pay Pool?
  • Employees who share in distribution of Pay Pool
    fund
  • Actual pool of money that funds performance
    payouts
  • How are membership and boundaries of a Pay Pool
    determined?
  • By organizational structure
  • By similar lines of occupations or jobs
  • By geographical location
  • By organizational mission
  • Other considerations pay bands, career groups,
    etc.
  • DON guidance recommended size range of 50 to 150
  • Pay Pools will be structured differently in
    different organizations.

DoN Performance Management, Interim Guidance,
Section 13, c.
5-25
198
Pay Pools
  • Pay Pool structures may be redefined each cycle.
  • All Pay Pool officials/raters will be management
    officials.
  • Sub-Pay Pools may be considered when
About PowerShow.com