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INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGY

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Title: INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGY


1
INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGY
  • Instructor
  • Dr. Manjunath Kamath, Associate Professor of
    Industrial Engineering and Management
  • 322 EN, 744-9132 (Direct, Voice Mail) 744-6055
    (Main Office) 744-4654 (Fax)
  • E-Mail mkamath_at_okstate.edu CCIM URL
    www.okstate.edu/cocim
  • Office Hours M 4 pm 5 pm TTh 11 am noon
    F 1pm - 2pm
  • Graduate Assistant
  • Mr. Mukul Patki
  • 502 EN, 744-7202 (Direct, Voice Mail) 744-6055
    (Main Office) 744-4654 (Fax)
  • E-Mail patki_at_okstate.edu
  • Office Hours Th 2pm - 4 pm

2
COURSE DESCRIPTION
Catalog Description For current and potential
engineering and technology managers. Knowledge
of information systems and technology to lead the
specification, selection, implementation, and
integration of information technology in
manufacturing and service organizations.
Management issues involved in the use of
information technology in organizations. Prerequi
sites Graduate standing or consent of instructor.
3
COURSE OBJECTIVES
  • To develop an awareness of modern information
    systems concepts, such as database architectures,
    computing architectures, application
    architectures, the Internet, and Intranets, and
    their impact on organizational performance.
  • To identify the different phases in the design,
    development, implementation, and maintenance of
    effective information systems.
  • To understand the basics of content creation,
    management, and distribution.

4
COURSE OBJECTIVES
  • To understand and evaluate commercially available
    systems and solutions for data management and
    report generation.
  • To develop an understanding of the technical and
    human issues involved in managing, controlling,
    and administering information technologies.
  • To explore new organizational structures (e.g.
    virtual corporations) resulting from the use of
    modern information systems and technology.

5
PRIMARY REFERENCES
Alter S. (1999), Information Systems A
Management Perspective, Third Edition,
Prentice-Hall, Inc., New Jersey.
(www.prenhall.com/alter) Comer, D.E. (1997), The
Internet Book, Second Edition, Prentice-Hall,
Inc.,NewJersey. (http//vig.prenhall.com/acadbook/
0,2581,0138901619,00.html)
6
TECHNICAL REFERENCES
Comer D.E. (1995) Internetworking with TCP/IP
Volume I Principles, Protocols and
Architectures, Third Edition, Prentice-Hall,
Inc., New Jersey. Orfali R., D. Harkey and J.
Edwards (1999), Client/Server Survival Guide,
Third Edition, John Wiley. Yeager N.J. and R.E.
McGrath (1996), Web Server Technology The
Advanced Guide for World Wide Web Information
Providers, Morgan Kaufmann Publishers.
7
OTHER REFERENCES
Gupta, U. (2000), Information Systems Success in
the 21st Century, Prentice-Hall, Inc., New
Jersey. Haag, S., M. Cummings and J. Dawkins
(2000), Management Information Systems for the
Information Age, Second Edition, Irwin
McGraw-Hill, Boston. Stair, R.M. (1996),
Principles of Information Systems A Managerial
Approach, Second Edition, Boyd and Fraser
Publishing Company, Boston. Turban E., E.
McLean and J. Wetherbe (1996), Information
Technology for Management, John Wiley and Sons,
Inc., New York. Whitten, J.L. and L.D. Bentley
(1998), Systems Analysis and Design Methods,
Fourth Edition, Irwin McGraw-Hill, Boston.
(www.tech.purdue.edu/textbooks/sadm)
8
GRADING POLICY
Method of Instruction Two seventy-five minute
class periods per week. Class will consist of
lecture and discussion. Grading Policy Graded
work will be weighted as follows Mid-term
Examination 20 Homework (8-10 sets) 30 Term
Paper 25 Final Examination 25
9
GRADING POLICY
  • Grades will be given on a 90, 80, 70, 60 basis.
    The instructor reserves the right to lower the
    curve as circumstances warrant.
  • Homework assignments are expected to be well
    organized and neatly presented. They will be
    graded and returned to the student.
  • Academic dishonesty will not be tolerated. When
    the instructor feels beyond reasonable doubt that
    dishonesty has occurred, he will take
    disciplinary action in accordance with university
    policies and procedures.
  • Spring Syllabus Attachment
  • www2.okstate.edu/acad/sylatsp00.html

10
TENTATIVE COURSE OUTLINE
Introduction to the Course 1 Information
System Framework and Development 1 Zachman's
framework phases in system development. Current
Trends in Information System Development and
Application 2 ERP web-based systems
e-commerce globalization. Types of Information
Systems 1 Transaction processing systems
management information systems decision support
systems etc.
11
TENTATIVE COURSE OUTLINE
Databases and Database Management
Systems 3 File systems vs. databases database
management systems database topology data
warehouses. Computing and Communication
Architectures 3 Centralized vs. distributed
systems client/server architectures LANs WANs
etc. Application Development 2 Programming
languages operating systems html XML etc.
Internet, Intranets, and Extranets 4 Protoco
ls - TCP/IP, http web-servers browsers domain
names security technologies etc. Information
Systems Development 3 Methodologies data,
process and object models CASE tools
prototyping.
12
TENTATIVE COURSE OUTLINE
Data Management 2 Evaluating commercial
systems report generation online analytical
processing (OLAP) etc. New Organizational
Structures 2 Virtual/extended enterprises
supply chain systems. Organizational, Human and
Ethical Issues 4 Impact on strategic planning,
business processes and organizational
performance privacy and security issues
information ergonomics. Directions for New
Technology 1
13
INFORMATION SYSTEMS
An arrangement of people, data, processes,
interfaces and geography that are integrated for
the purposes of supporting and improving the
day-to-day operations in a business, as well as
fulfilling the problem-solving and
decision-making information needs of business
managers Source Whitten, J.L. and L.D.
Bentley(1998), Systems Analysis and Design
Methods, pp. 38, Fourth Edition Irwin
McGraw-Hill, Boston
14
MAIN IDEA DISCUSSED BY ZACHMAN
  • There is a set of architectural representations
    produced over the process of building a complex
    engineering product representing the different
    perspectives of the different participants.

15
(No Transcript)
16
INFORMATION SYSTEM PERSPECTIVES
S Y S T E M A N A L Y S T S
System Owners
INFORMATION SYSTEM SCOPE (purpose and vision
goals and objectives costs and benefits)
System Users
INFORMATION SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS (WHAT the system
is and must do independent of technology)
System Designer
INFORMATION SYSTEM DESIGN (HOW the system will be
implemented using technology)
System Builders
INFORMATION SYSTEM COMPONENTS (the actual,
technical implementation of the system)
Source Whitten, J.L. and L.D. Bentley(1998),
Systems Analysis and Design Methods,
Fourth Edition Irwin McGraw-Hill, Boston
17
CLASSIFICATION OF STAKEHOLDERS
  • System owners pay for the system to be built and
    maintained
  • System users are the people who actually use the
    system to perform or support the work to be
    completed
  • System designers are the technical specialists
    who design the system to meet the customer
    requirements
  • System builders are the technical specialists who
    construct, test and deliver the system into
    operation

18
MAIN IDEA DISCUSSED BY ZACHMAN
  • The same product can be described, for different
    purposes, in different ways, resulting in
    different types of descriptions.

19
DIFFERENT DESCRIPTIONS OF THE SAME PRODUCT
  • Material description It talks about

    WHAT the thing is made of
  • Functional Description It talks about HOW the
    thing works
  • Location Description It talks about WHERE the
    flows exist

20
I/S ANALOGS FOR THE DIFFERENT DESCRIPTIONS
21
FOCUSES
  • DATA the raw material used to create useful
    information
  • PROCESSES the activities that carry out the
    mission of the business
  • INTERFACES how the system interacts with people
    and other systems
  • GEOGRAPHY where the data is captured and stored
    where the processes happen where the interfaces
    happen

22
WHITTEN-BENTLEYS ADAPTATION OF ZACHMANS
FRAMEWORK
System Data
System Processes
System Interfaces
System Geography
Methodology
S Y S T E M A N A L Y S T S
System Owners
Business Subjects
Business Functions
System Context
Operating Location
Survey Phase
System Users
Data Requirements
Business Processes
Interface Requirements
Communica- tion Requirements
Study Phase
System Designer
Database Schema
Application Schema
Interface Schema
Network Schema
Configuration Phase
System Builders
Database Programs
Application Programs
Component Programs
Network Programs
Construction Phase
23
WHITTEN-BENTLEYS ADAPTATION OF ZACHMANS
FRAMEWORK
System Data
System Processes
System Interfaces
System Geography
Methodology
S Y S T E M A N A L Y S T S
System Owners
Business Subjects Information about the
resources to be managed
Business Functions Ongoing activities that
support the business
System Context Unit/business the new system
should interface with
Operating Location Not synonymous with
computer center
Survey Phase
System Users
Data Requirements How the data is or should be
implemented
Business Processes Discrete activities having
inputs, outputs and start/end times
Interface Requirements How users interact with
the system
Communica- tion Requirements Technology
independent information resource requirements
Study Phase
24
WHITTEN-BENTLEYS ADAPTATION OF ZACHMANS
FRAMEWORK
System Data
System Processes
System Interfaces
System Geography
Methodology
S Y S T E M A N A L Y S T S
System Designer
Database Schema Translation of data
requirements into databases
Application Schema Implementa- tion of
bus.processes using computers
Interface Schema Properties, system
states, events and their responses
Network Schema Model indentifying all centers
involved in an application
Configuration Phase
System Builders
Database Programs Closest to database technology
foundation
Application Programs Language based representati
on of what a process should do
Component Programs GUIs - Visual
BASIC Delphi Powerbuilder
Network Programs Machine readable
specifications of computer communication paramete
rs
Construction Phase
25
INTERESTING FEATURES OF THE FRAMEWORK
  • Each element on either axis of the matrix is
    explicitly differentiable from all other elements
    on that one axis.
  • These representations are not merely successive
    levels of increasing detail but are actually
    different representations.

Source Whitten, J.L. and L.D. Bentley(1998),
Systems Analysis and Design Methods,
Fourth Edition Irwin McGraw-Hill, Boston
26
SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT PHASES
Source Whitten, J.L. and L.D. Bentley(1998),
Systems Analysis and Design Methods,
Fourth Edition Irwin McGraw-Hill, Boston
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