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Spring 2009 Evaluation Highlights: North Carolina Virtual Public School

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Are Students Successful in NCVPS Courses? ... 92% of students agreed courses taught them technology literacy skills using such ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Spring 2009 Evaluation Highlights: North Carolina Virtual Public School


1
Spring 2009 Evaluation HighlightsNorth Carolina
Virtual Public School
  • Kevin Oliver, Assistant Professor of
    Instructional Technology
  • NC State University

2
Background
  • Friday Institute has received annual contracts
    from DPI to assist with the evaluation of the
    North Carolina Virtual Public School (NCVPS)
  • recurring surveys of stakeholder groups (i.e.,
    students, teachers, distance learning advisors,
    and high school principals) (Sum 07, 09 Spring
    08, 09)
  • also, focused studies of NCVPS pilot initiatives
  • efforts to design and develop course modules for
    elementary-middle school
  • student success course to transition 8th graders

3
Spring 2009 Surveys
  • questions about student learning, barriers to
    success, teacher preparation and quality, advisor
    preparation and quality, curriculum and teaching
    quality, and leadership support
  • similar questions to spring '08, allowing for
    comparison of cohorts
  • spring 2009 response rates

4
Are Students Successful in NCVPS Courses?
  • more than 75 of students, teachers, and advisors
    agreed or strongly agreed that students were
    succeeding in NCVPS courses
  • AP teachers were the most likely to agree
    students were succeeding at 100 while only 55.6
    of credit recovery teachers reported the same

5
Are Students Learning More Online Compared to
Face-to-Face?
  • when asked if students were learning less or
    learning more online, compared to similar
    face-to-face courses, 43 of teachers reported
    students were learning more online
  • significant increase from lt 25in 2008

6
Are Students Gaining Tangential Skills from
Participation in NCVPS Courses?
  • 97 of students agreed courses taught them
    learning and innovation skills (e.g., creativity,
    critical thinking, problem solving)
  • significant increase from 88 in 2008
  • 92 of students agreed courses taught them
    technology literacy skills using such tools as
    Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Web development
    software, audio/video editors, photo editors
  • significant increase from 87 in 2008

7
Are Students Gaining Tangential Skills from
Participation in NCVPS Courses?
  • 79 of students agreed courses taught them
    information literacy skills (e.g., online
    research skills)
  • significant increase from 68 in 2008
  • nearly two-thirds of students and more than
    three-fourths of teachers and advisors agreed
    that NCVPS courses were supporting student
    attainment of five of the seven 21st century
    skill areas (exceptions civic literacy, global
    understanding)

8
Are Stakeholders Satisfied with Curriculum
Quality?
  • 95.2 of teachers agreed course content was
    sufficiently rigorous
  • significant increase from 90.6 in 2008
  • 92.9 of teachers agreed course assignments were
    sufficiently rigorous
  • significant increase from 88.4 in 2008
  • 90.9 of teachers agreed that they provided
    differentiated content and assignments
  • significant increase from 79 in 2008

9
Are Stakeholders Satisfied with Curriculum
Quality?
  • 88 of teachers agreed they leveraged 21st
    century tools such as wikis, blogs, and podcasts
    in their courses
  • significant increase from 54 in 2008

10
Are Stakeholders Satisfied with the Availability
of Courses Offered by NCVPS?
  • only 10 of students reported problems getting
    into courses they wanted to take
  • only 11 of students reported NCVPS was not
    offering the courses they needed to take

11
Are Stakeholders Satisfied with Teaching Quality?
  • 76 of students and 81 of advisors agreed that
    teachers were appropriately prepared to teach an
    online course
  • 100 of teachers agreed that they participated in
    NCVPS professional development in the past year
  • 50.2 of students agreed that teachers posted
    their own audio-visual presentations to explain
    content such elaborations were requested by many
    students in written comments

12
Are Stakeholders Satisfied with Advising Quality?
  • 26.6 of students agreed that a lack of distance
    learning advisor support was a barrier to taking
    NCVPS courses
  • 85.3 of teachers agreed it was a barrier for at
    least some students

13
Are Stakeholders Satisfied with Advising Quality?
  • DLA role is only full-time for 27 of advisors
    (typically media coordinators or counselors)
  • advisors report four time-consuming tasks
    marketing courses, registering students,
    monitoring student grades, and counseling
    students to stay on task
  • some comment it can be difficult to manage
    regular job role and advising role simultaneously
    (mean of 73 advisees per advisor)

14
Do Stakeholders Encounter Technical Barriers When
Using NCVPS Courses?
  • 41 of students agreed that technical problems
    affected their experiences taking online courses
  • significant decrease from 52 in 2008
  • 52 of teachers agreed that technical problems
    affected their experiences teaching online
    courses
  • significant decrease from 77 in 2008

15
Do Stakeholders Encounter Technical Barriers When
Using NCVPS Courses?
  • credit recovery students were significantly more
    likely to agree at 27.7 that a lack of technical
    expertise was a barrier to taking NCVPS courses
    compared to the three other course levels between
    11-17
  • some credit recovery students may require more
    technical support than students at other course
    levels

16
Do Stakeholders Encounter Infrastructure Barriers
When Taking NCVPS Courses?
  • more than 80 of students indicated they had
    appropriate access to computers and the Internet
    to take NCVPS courses, so adequate infrastructure
    appears to be available to most students
  • school-based computers are the primary source of
    access for more than 47 of students only 34
    primarily use home-owned computers

17
Do Stakeholders Encounter Infrastructure Barriers
When Taking NCVPS Courses?
  • 26.3 of credit recovery students agreed that a
    lack of access to computers at school was a
    barrier--significantly more than students at
    other course levels (general, honors, AP)
  • credit recovery students were significantly more
    likely than students at other levels to report
    Internet connectivity as a barrier to using NCVPS
    courses, both at school (27.1) and in the home
    (30.3)

18
Are School and LEA Administrators Strong
Advocates for NCVPS?
  • only about one-half of students and teachers
    agreed that school-level and LEA administration
    were enthusiastic and supportive of online course
    opportunities
  • more than 88 of principals surveyed indicated
    they were enthusiastic about offering online
    course opportunities to students (n 47)

19
Do Stakeholders Personally Advocatefor NCVPS?
  • percent who agree/strongly agree they would
    recommend more students take NCVPS courses

20
Subject Area Close-UpForeign Language
  • significantly fewer foreign language students
    agreed they were successful in NCVPS courses at
    68.3
  • significantly fewer foreign language students
    agreed they were learning more online compared to
    face-to-face at 18.9
  • significantly fewer foreign language students
    agreed that their courses supported the seven
    21st century skill areas

21
Subject Area Close-UpForeign Language
  • significantly fewer foreign language students
    agreed that their teachers were adequately
    prepared at 71.7
  • significantly fewer foreign language students
    agreed with a number of teacher quality variables
    (e.g., differentiation, using 21st century tools,
    encouraging study strategies)

22
Subject Area Close-UpMath
  • significantly fewer math students would recommend
    more students take NCVPS courses at 47.5
  • significantly fewer math students agreed that
    their courses supported the seven 21st century
    skill areas
  • significantly fewer math students agreed with a
    number of teacher quality variables (e.g.,
    differentiation, using 21st century tools,
    encouraging study strategies)

23
Subject Area Close-UpsDiscussion
  • follow-up summer survey inquiring into subject
    area discrepancies
  • English/Language Arts courses among the most
    highly rated
  • could be problematic teaching foreign languages
    and math online, supporting synchronous dialogue
    and teachers visually working out problems
  • OR, students may just like these subjects less
    overall
  • results might be the same if we compared foreign
    language and math to other subjects in
    face-to-face environments
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