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200304 TECH PREP ANNUAL PLAN FOR MEETING MS' GOALS FOR ACHIEVING ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

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Title: 200304 TECH PREP ANNUAL PLAN FOR MEETING MS' GOALS FOR ACHIEVING ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE


1
Independence High School
2
2003-04 TECH PREP ANNUAL PLAN FOR MEETING
MISSISSIPPI GOALS FOR ACHIEVING ACADEMIC
EXCELLENCE
3
2003-04 SCHOOL PLANNING TEAM
  • Name
  • Al Reed
  • Gary Walker
  • Shelly Scott
  • Markesha Lee
  • Peggy Quinn
  • Marty Mc Farlin
  • Nancy Smith
  • Gale Crockett
  • Position
  • Principal
  • Superintendent
  • IHS Tech Prep Contact/Chemistry
  • Pre-Algebra, Algebra II
  • English IV
  • Geometry/Advanced Math
  • Career Center Technician
  • Academic Counselor

4
Our Goals
  • In the fall, all teachers were surveyed regarding
    the indicators that should be marked for the
    goals in this plan. Using the results of the
    survey and much debate, our school planning team
    choose the following indicators.

5
High Expectations
  • Goal 1 Setting higher expectations and getting
    students to meet them.
  • Required and Chosen Indicators
  • Require relevant homework in all classes,
    including vocational.
  • Require more reading, writing, and oral
    presentations in all academic and vocational
    classes.
  • Require students to complete a Senior Project
    that includes research, a product or service, a
    written report, and an oral presentation
    (exhibition of mastery) to a group of teachers
    and/or other experts.
  • Require students to complete missed assignments
    and adhere to school district guidelines
    regarding make-up work.

6
High Expectations
  • In an effort to require more reading in class,
    many teachers developed lesson plans that both
    set aside time for students to read aloud in
    class as well as read to the students.
  • Some teachers required reports that became
    integration projects. For example, 8th grade
    English students did a report on Anne Frank and
    typed it in Computer Discovery using guidelines
    learned.
  • High School teachers utilized our upgraded
    Computer Lab (Business Courses) assigning reports
    Mrs. Brinkley allowed them to type.

7
High Expectations
  • Oral presentation examples include the Senior
    Project of Macbeth which required students to
    role play which dressed up as a witch. Also in
    Macbeth, students are given the opportunity to
    make up a rap to arouse interest in the play.
  • Or simpler examples such as Outstanding Student
    in American History. Students line the front of
    the room answering questions on the current
    chapter, until all students have answered one
    correctly.
  • In Science Skills and Chemistry, students
    presented N.E.R.D. s to the class by making a
    baseball card with information about their
    assigned N.E.R.D. (Names Earning Respect
    Dignity). This project also afforded students
    the opportunity to learn how to research using
    internet biography websites and Current Biography
    periodicals.
  • English teachers at the high school level
    required students to memorize and recite passages
    of literature. For example, Caesar in English II
    and Canterbury Tales in English IV.
  • In Mississippi Studies, a student was selected
    each nine weeks to teach a chapter. The
    student is responsible for conveying the
    information to the students under the supervision
    of Mr. Harris. They provide daily assignments
    for the class as well as submit a list of
    potential questions for the test.

8
High Expectations
  • Teachers indicated they adhered to the district
    policy on missed work by requiring an excuse slip
    in order for the student to be allowed to submit
    the assignment as well as making sure it was done
    by the guidelines outlined in the student
    handbook.
  • Some teachers used a written request detailing
    the work missed and the date due in order to
    avoid miscommunication.

9
VOCATIONAL STUDIES
  • Goal 2 Increasing access to challenging
    vocational and technical studies, with a major
    emphasis on using high-level mathematics,
    science, language arts, and problem-solving
    skills in the context of modern workplace
    practices and in preparation for continued
    learning.
  • Required and Chosen Indicators
  • Train vocational teachers to reinforce academic
    skills in vocational classes.
  • Require Career, Computer, and Technology
    Discovery teachers to meet state licensure
    guidelines.
  • Provide funds in the local district budget to
    maintain Career, Computer, and Technology
    Discovery labs.
  • Document two meetings per year for discovery
    Craft/Advisory Committeesfall and spring.
  • Require oral presentations in each vocational
    class.

10
Vocational Studies
  • There are five vocational programs at IHS and
    seven others at the Tate County vocational center
    in Coldwater. After meeting with these teachers
    last fall, it was decided the indicator that
    could be addressed the most successfully was
    requiring oral presentations. Several of the
    vocational teachers required them. At IHS, Mr.
    Malone, our Agricultural Teacher required his
    students to memorize the FFA creed and recite it
    in class.

11
ACADEMIC STUDIES
  • Goal 3 Increasing access to academic studies
    that teach the essential concepts from the
    college preparatory curriculum through applied
    strategies that enable students to see the
    relationship between course content and future
    roles they envision for themselves.
  • Required and Chosen Indicators
  • Train academic teachers in contextual methodology
    and the use of technology.
  • Provide resources, manipulatives, and consumables
    needed to change classroom methodology.
  • Require teachers to enhance classroom instruction
    by including applied teaching strategies.
  • Require oral presentations in each class of 7th
    through 12th grades.
  • Require 12th grade students to complete a Senior
    Project.

12
Academic Studies
  • Initially, all teachers hired in a Tech Prep
    class are sent to training specific to their
    class.
  • Several staff developments have been held where
    teachers shared new or unique ideas (i.e. lesson
    plans) in order to reach students on their level.
  • Some teachers from other districts have presented
    during staff development time in order to provide
    teachers with training.
  • Teachers have also attended workshops on an
    individual basis to gather new techniques.

13
Academic Studies
  • As per the initial memorandum of agreement signed
    between the county and the state, resources,
    manipulatives, and consumables were provided for
    the designated classes.
  • Our district continues to set aside monies to
    purchase items needed.

14
Academic Studies
  • The usage of applied academic instruction has
    gradually increased at IHS. Here are a few
    examples
  • Music and physics classes worked together to
    learn about sound using various instruments.
  • Biology classes made cells out of clay and DNA
    from marshmallows and toothpicks.
  • Genetic principles are taught in Biology I, II
    and Science Skills by flipping coins and making
    babies.
  • Chemistry, Science Skills and Physical Science
    students learned about percent composition of
    substances by counting M Ms.
  • Physics students learned about aerodynamics using
    model airplanes.
  • Math students learn by making fraction folders in
    class. Measurement is practiced by using rulers.
    Students are required to work problems at the
    board. Students worked in groups to make a
    survey that addressed new terms such as
    population and random sample. They were required
    to administer that survey to someone outside of
    school and present the results to their
    classmates.

15
PROGRAM OF STUDY
  • Goal 4 Having students complete a challenging
    program of study with an upgraded academic core
    and a major. An upgraded academic core includes
    at least four years of college preparatory
    English and three years each of mathematics and
    science, with at least two years in each area
    equivalent in content to courses offered in the
    college preparatory program. Students should
    also complete at least four Carnegie units in a
    career or academic major and two Carnegie units
    in related technical core courses.
  • Required and Chosen Indicators
  • Enroll all academic and vocational students in a
    rigorous sequential course of study based upon
    their career cluster.
  • Participate in articulation team meetings with
    local community college and share information
    with students and parents.
  • Provide a copy of the sequential courses of study
    in registration information and materials.

16
PROGRAM OF STUDY
  • At the onset of Tech Prep, five cluster areas
    were identified as paths to assist students in
    obtaining their goals past high school.
  • Planning teams were asked to compile a guide
    unique to the classes offered at their school
    called the Sequential Course of Study. This guide
    would be used as a focal point in making class
    choices during the registration process.
  • Although the clusters have been expanded upon,
    the guide is still used and progress is being
    made on expanding it to accommodate the change in
    cluster areas.

17
PROGRAM OF STUDY
  • Successfully Choosing Your Classes
  • Although the state requires each student
    successfully complete specific classes, the path
    you choose in order to complete those
    requirements can vary. Depending upon your grade
    level, you may or may not have chosen a specific
    career but know what general area you would like
    to focus on. A career educational plan with an
    occupational goal enables you to focus on what
    you want to pursue. This plan, your parents, the
    counselor and your advisor can help you select
    the appropriate courses for that end. A
    sequential course of study focusing on the Career
    Clusters initiated by the Tech Prep program has
    been developed to assist you. This course of
    study is not only designed to graduate students
    with marketable skills in order to obtain a
    position in todays workforce but to also prepare
    a student to articulate successfully with a
    junior college.

18
PROGRAM OF STUDY Example Sequential Course of
Study
19
Five Career Clusters Expanded to Sixteen
  • Agriculture/Natural Resources Technology
  • Construction
  • Arts, Audio-Video Technology Communications
  • Business Administrative Services
  • Education Training Services
  • Financial Services
  • Public Administration/Government
  • Health Science
  • Hospitality Tourism
  • Human Services
  • Information Technology Services
  • Legal Protective Services
  • Manufacturing
  • Retail/Wholesale Sales Services
  • Scientific Research, Engineering Technical
    Services
  • Transportation, Distribution Logistics Services

20
WORKPLACE EXPERIENCES
  • Goal 5 Providing students access to a
    structured system of work-based and high status
    school-based learninghigh school and
    postsecondarycollaboratively planned by
    educators, employers, and workers, and resulting
    in an industryrecognized credential and
    employment in a career pathway.
  • Chosen Indicators
  • Develop a resource file of individuals in your
    community who are willing to serve as mentors,
    speakers, sponsors for shadowing experiences and
    tours, and worksite hosts for student interns.
  • Utilize local business and industry
    representatives to assist educators in preparing
    students for workplace experiences.

21
WORKPLACE EXPERIENCES
  • We have created a small resource file of
    individuals in our community willing to become
    involved at school.
  • Several Job Shadowing trips have allowed groups
    of students to observe first hand various
    occupations.
  • Speakers have been engaged to talk to classes.

22
TEACHERS WORKING TOGETHER
  • Goal 6 Having an organizational structure and
    schedule enabling academic and vocational
    teachers to have the time to plan and provide
    integrated instruction aimed at teaching high
    status academic and technical content.
  • Required and Chosen Indicators
  • Provide time for academic and vocational teachers
    to meet and plan activities together.
  • Require academic and vocational teachers to
    enhance classroom instruction by including
    integrated strategies. (NOTE Integrated
    activities must be academic to vocational 50 of
    the district or consortium requirement.)
  • Provide professional development to support
    teachers in integrating academic and technical
    studies.
  • Exchange teaching assignments between academic
    and vocational teachers when appropriate.
  • Provide academic teachers with list of academic
    skills needed in each vocational program.
  • Require students to complete a Senior Project.

23
TEACHERS WORKING TOGETHER
  • Time is provided by the district each semester to
    allow academic and vocational teachers to meet
    and discuss potential integration ideas.
    Something as simple as swapping lesson plans on
    the objective vs. exchanging classes and teaching
    them. As our number of meetings grows, so does
    our ability to communicate with each other.

24
TEACHERS WORKING TOGETHER
  • It is required that academic and vocational
    teachers complete integration projects. Many
    are simple and only require exchange of lesson
    plans to gather different ways to teach an
    objective.
  • English II and BCT
  • Consumer Science and Biology I
  • Technology Discovery and Biology I and Science
    Skills and Reasoning

25
TEACHERS WORKING TOGETHER
  • However, the number of integration projects
    between two academic teachers is much higher.
  • Music class and physics
  • Chemistry and English
  • Biology II and Algebra
  • American History and Science
  • Computer Applications and Business

26
TEACHERS WORKING TOGETHER
  • Integration is present at the junior high level
    as well.
  • Career Discovery and Math
  • Computer Discovery and English
  • Computer Discovery and Social Studies

27
Teachers Working TogetherAcademic Skills Needed
for Vocational Classes (as suggested by Tate
County Vocational Teachers)
  • The following skills were chosen to be the most
    important
  • Reading with comprehension
  • Being able to summarize
  • Writing Abilities
  • Spelling
  • Research Papers
  • Math Abilities
  • Fractions, decimals
  • Measurement
  • Percentage
  • Critical Thinking Skills
  • Reasoning out problems
  • Teachers felt that attendance honesty played an
    integral role in successful completion of their
    class as well.

28
STUDENTS ACTIVELY ENGAGED
  • Goal 7 Having each student actively engaged in
    the learning process.
  • Required and Chosen Indicators
  • Train teachers to implement critical thinking,
    problem-solving skills, project-based learning,
    senior project, etc.

29
STUDENTS ACTIVELY ENGAGED
  • Teachers have incorporated critical thinking and
    problem solving ideas into their lesson plans.
  • Senior projects such as Mrs. Quinns on Product
    Development engage students to the fullest.
    Groups are assigned a product to create such as a
    new shoe, cereal, or childs toy. Students are
    required to research production costs, market
    costs and target consumers. A sample product has
    to be created and presented to the class. The
    class represents the CEO and board of a
    multi-million dollar company. Physical
    appearance is graded as well.

30
GUIDANCE AND ADVISEMENT
  • Goal 8 Involving each student and his/her
    parent(s) in a career guidance and individualized
    advising system aimed at ensuring the completion
    of an accelerated program of study with a career
    or academic major.
  • Required and Chosen Indicators
  • Provide adequate funding to keep the Career
    Center open with a full-time, trained technician.
  • Provide a schedule, which enables students to
    complete grade-level activities in their
    computerized career education plans.
  • Train academic/vocational counselors and career
    center technicians to coordinate the activities
    related to career development.
  • Implement a well-planned system for getting
    parents involved in their childs career planning
    process, including a parent conference.
  • Provide time in schedule for teacher-advisor
    meetings.

31
Guidance and Advisement
  • IHS has a funded, functional Career Center.
  • Our Technician and Counselor attend various
    meetings on updates and new ideas.
  • They plan for 10th-12th grade students to
    complete the computerized portions of their CEP
    during either non subject area test classes or by
    scheduling them time in the Career Center.
  • 7th-9th grade students are able to complete their
    activities in their Discovery class.

32
Guidance and Advisement
  • Although the majority of our CEP activities have
    become computerized, a few advisor meetings are
    held throughout the year.
  • On these days, our bell schedule is adjusted and
    students attend a 20-30 minute meeting to receive
    information, update their CEP and complete any
    activities necessary.

33
Guidance and Advisement
  • Step 1
  • In the spring of each school year, students are
    encouraged to begin contemplating what classes
    they should take in the fall. Classes that are
    needed for the career they have chosen.

34
Guidance and Advisement
  • Step 2
  • Our counselor discusses with students the courses
    offered and guides them to chose classes that
    will help them achieve their goal past
    graduation. Since this goal may or may not be
    college, our ninth grade classes are taken on a
    tour of the vo-tech center so they may learn
    about the classes offered that will provide them
    with job skills employers are looking for. For
    the college bound student it is shown to them how
    the vocational classes can be a stepping stone in
    preparation for college.

35
Guidance and Advisement
  • Step 3
  • Students are provided with current graduation
    requirements, classes offered, etc., and are
    asked to complete a scheduling sheet which is
    taken home to the parents for a signature.

36
Guidance and Advisement
  • Step 4
  • Students write the preliminary schedule in their
    CEP. Then parents are sent a letter with time
    choices and an appointment is made for the
    parents to come to the school and approve their
    childs schedule. This is a day-long event that
    all advisors participate in. Current report
    cards, Subject Area Test information, and other
    graduation information is provided to the advisor
    so they can make sure each parent understands
    exactly how their child is progressing.

37
Guidance and Advisement
  • If at this time, there are parents who were
    unable to keep their appointment, efforts are
    made to contact and reschedule. The first
    contact is by sending a letter home. If that is
    not successful, attempts are made to contact by
    phone.
  • Over the last several years, our parent signature
    rate has varied between 85 and 92 percent.

38
Extra Help
  • Goal 9 Providing a structured system of extra
    help to enable all career-bound students to
    successfully complete an accelerated program of
    study that includes high-level academic content
    and a major.
  • Chosen Indicators
  • Provide a resource/computer lab for remediation
    and extra help.
  • Develop and publicize to all students and parents
    a schedule for teachers to be available before
    and after school to assist students in weak
    areas.
  • Offer extra help to all students who need
    assistance by qualified personnel.
  • Supplement pay or reduce number of classes taught
    for teachers to provide extra help to
    low-achieving students before or after school
    hours.
  • Arrange transportation for students who
    participate in the extra help program.

39
Extra Help
  • Our After School Program was implemented through
    a grant written by our Technology Discovery
    Teacher, Mr. Bryant. He schedules teachers to
    help students along with coordinating
    transportation home. On an average, there are
    27-30 students that take advantage of our
    program however, there have been as many as 60
    on a given day.

40
After School Program
  • The program meets Monday Thursday
  • Help is provided by teachers for
  • Biology I
  • English
  • All areas of math
  • Other subjects are addressed on a case by case
    basis.
  • All students may sign up for transportation home.

41
USING TEST DATA
  • Goal 10 Using student assessment and program
    evaluation data to continuously improve
    curriculum, instruction, school climate,
    organization, and management to advance student
    learning.
  • Chosen Indicators
  • Develop a plan to improve curriculum and
    instruction based on test results.
  • Share the results of student assessments, how to
    interpret those results, and how those results
    will be used for school improvement with parents,
    teachers, and the community.

42
Using Test Data
  • Troubled students are identified by test scores.
  • Some students are able to enroll in the after
    school program for help.
  • 7th and 8th grade students identified as having
    difficulties are able to utilized the junior high
    computer lab to work on tutorial programs.
  • Standardized score reports are sent home so
    parents are aware if there is a problem.

43
  • CAREER DEVELOPMENT REQUIREMENTS
  • 7TH 12TH GRADE

44
Involving Parents in Career Planning
  • Parent Conference are held on a yearly basis to
    cover 4-year plans, career reports, test scores,
    and other relevant issues.
  • Dates
  • 2000-2001 April 13th
  • 2001-2002 April 23rd
  • 2002-2003 April 22nd
  • 2003-2004 April 21st
  • 2004-2005 April 12th

45
Activities required of Discovery Students
  • For the Discovery classes, many of the CEP
    activities are done as a part of the regular
    curriculum.
  • 10th, 11th and 12th Grade levels utilize
    non-subject area test classes as well as the
    career center to complete their activities.
  • All grade levels attend scheduled advisor
    meetings.

46
Seventh Grade
  • Use Career Futures in 7th Career Discovery.
    Place work in Journals (already part of the
    curriculum)
  • REQUIRED SECTIONS
  • Looking at Me (Likes/Dislikes, Life on a
    Budget, Climbing Skills Mountain)
  • Looking at Occupations (Detailed Job
    Descriptions related to Discovery Modules,
    Clusters)
  • SUGGESTED SECTIONS
  • Looking at Me (Flight School-Education/Abilities
    required in Jobs) (Picture of Me-Basic Resume)

47
Eighth Grade
  • Use Career Futures in 8th Computer Discovery.
    Place work in Journals (already part of
    curriculum)
  • REQUIRED SECTIONS
  • My Portfolio (On to High School-Career Pathway
    4-year Plan) (Whats Next Career Goals)
  • SUGGESTED
  • My Portfolio (Printables Certificates,
    Letters to Parents)

48
Ninth Grade
  • REQUIRED ACTIVITIES
  • Post-Secondary Planning Sheet for 9th (Discuss in
    advisory group Aug/Sept))
  • Interest Profiler (Job Description for preferred
    occupation)
  • Planner (High School Education Plans 4-year
    plan) (Will need Graduation Requirements)
  • Occupations (Job Description for each Technology
    Discovery module and place in Journal)
  • SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES
  • Planner (Challenges)

49
Tenth Grade
  • REQUIRED ACTIVITIES
  • Planner (Post-Secondary Planning Sheet for 10th)
    (Discuss with students in Aug/Sept)
  • Interest Profiler (Job Description for preferred
    occupation) (if not already completed in 9th)
  • Work Importance Locator
  • Planner (SCANS Foundation Skills/Basic/Thinking/
    Personal)
  • SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES
  • Planner (Accomplishments)
  • Planner (Challenges)

50
Eleventh Grade
  • REQUIRED ACTIVITIES
  • Planner (Post-Secondary Planning Sheets) (Discuss
    with students in Aug/Sept)
  • Planner (Personal Information) (provides detailed
    information ideal for resumes and scholarships)
  • Planner (Resume) (produces a scanable resume
    complete with cover letters)
  • Post-Secondary/Graduate Schools Search
  • Planner (Post-Secondary Two Year Plan)
  • Planner (Employability Workplace
    Skills/Resources/Interpersonal/Information/Systems
    /Tech)
  • SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES
  • Planner (Accomplishments)
  • Planner (Challenges)

51
Twelfth Grade
  • REQUIRED ACTIVITIES
  • Planner (Post-Secondary Planning Sheets) (Discuss
    with students in Aug/Sept)
  • College Search/Selection (can print reports, can
    apply on line, can prepare form letters
    personalized with students information)
  • Planner (Interview/Job Applications)
  • Planner (Post-Secondary Paths with Alternative
    Options College, Military, and Apprenticeship)
  • Planner (Resumeupdate)
  • SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES
  • Scholarship Search (continued) Planner (Job
    Search)
  • Financial Aid Awards (see Financial Calculator
    available under EXTRAS button in this section)

52
What has this program provided?
  • T - Technology
  • E - Enabling
  • C - Children to
  • H - Heighten
  • P Performance in order to
  • R Resolve
  • E Everyday
  • P Problems
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