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PROFILE OF THE LONG TERM CARE REGISTERED NURSE IN VERMONT University of Vermont Office of Nursing Wo

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Title: PROFILE OF THE LONG TERM CARE REGISTERED NURSE IN VERMONT University of Vermont Office of Nursing Wo


1
PROFILE OF THE LONG TERM CARE REGISTERED NURSE IN
VERMONTUniversity of Vermont Office of Nursing
WorkforceBurlington, VT Mary Val Palumbo DNP,
APRN McNair Scholar Jennifer Abustan
  • Background
  • Work dissatisfaction and turnover continue to
    contribute to a serious nursing shortage,
    especially in long term care facilities. A
    paucity of research existed which examines
    demographics, satisfaction, and intent to leave
    of the long term care registered nurse in
    comparison to a statewide nurse workforce.
  • Purpose
  • Information about the existing long term care
    (LTC) nurse workforce will help inform retention
    and recruitment initiatives in this setting. An
    adequate registered nurse workforce in long term
    care settings is necessary to meet the growing
    health care needs of our aging society.
  • Recommendations
  • Robert Wood Johnson Foundations Wisdom at
    Work The Importance of the Older and Experienced
    Nurse in the Worksite (2006) offers these Best
    Practices for recruitment and retention that may
    be very appropriate for this particular nurse
    workforce
  • Career development and support at any age
  • Adequate financial support for continuing
    education/tuition
  • Lifestyle support (i.e. support for caregivers)
  • Skills update in formats that are older worker
    friendly
  • Further research may clarified what type of
    managerial conflict have an impact on nurse
    stress level.
  • Limitations
  • One small rural state, lacking in diversity, was
    used, therefore generalization is limited. Small
    sample size makes multivariate analyses
    difficult.

Methods A survey of 301 registered nurses working
in long term care facilities in rural Vermont use
conducted. The survey instrument included
recommended elements of the minimum data set for
nursing workforce analysis. Reliability was not
determined content validity was established by
expert panel review. Statistical (t-tests and chi
square analyses) and descriptive statistics were
used.
Results (n 301) Surveys were mailed to 13,321
and 5,803 were returned (51 of active RNs). Of
these, 4,061 reported that they worked as an RN
in Vermont and 301 reported working in a long
term care facility. In comparison with the
working statewide sample (n 3,760), LTC RNs
(n301) are significantly older (p .04), more
likely to be prepared at the diploma and AD
levels (plt.0001), less satisfied (plt.0001). The
LTC sample had a higher percent of nurses with
36 years of experience (20) compared to the
whole sample (15). However, most nurses in LTC
(64) reported being in their current position
for five years or less. Thirty-six percent of
the LTC RNs reported being likely to leave their
current position in the next year (plt.0001
compared to statewide sample). Those likely to
leave (n107) cited the following top reasons 1.
change positions, 2. stress, 3. management, 4.
salary and benefits.
Conclusions As the care demands in LTC settings
increase, attention should be paid to the
registered nurse workforce to ensure that they
have the adequate knowledge and skills to improve
satisfaction in their work environment. This
study suggests that this sample may have unmet
needs related to professional growth in
comparison to the statewide sample. Kovner et al.
(2006) identified high autonomy, high
distributive justice, high group cohesion, high
promotional opportunities, high variety of work,
low work-to-family conflict, and low
organizational constraint significantly
contribute to satisfaction. Increasing
satisfaction and decrease intention to leave
might be achievable with attention to these
important factors at the workplace.
Funding Acknowledgement HRSA  Grant
D65HP05247-01-00, Nurse Education, Practice and
Retention Career Ladders, Mission Essential
Ladders for a Lifetime References Hatcher BJ,
Bleich MR, Connolly C, Davis K, O'Neil Hewlett P,
Stokley Hill K. Wisdom at Work The Importance of
the Older and Experienced Nurse in the Workplace.
Vol. 2006 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
20061-74. Kovner C, Brewer C, Wu Y, Cheng Y,
Suzuki M. (2006) Factors Associated With Work
Satisfaction of Registered Nurses. Journal of
Nursing Scholarship, 38(1), 71-79.
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