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Charting Progress for Babies: What State Policies Can Best Promote Child Development from Birth

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Build the supply of high quality infant and toddler care for low-income ... Source: National Infant and Toddler Child Care Initiative. As of March 2007. 14 ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Charting Progress for Babies: What State Policies Can Best Promote Child Development from Birth


1
Charting Progress for BabiesWhat State Policies
Can Best Promote Child Development from Birth?
Rachel Schumacher, Senior Fellow, Center for Law
and Social Policy 11th Annual Birth to Three I
nstitute
June 28, 2007
2
Presentation Overview
  • Where are babies and what are their early care
    and education needs?
  • State policies and the Charting Progress for
    Babies in Child Care project
  • Overview and key principles
  • State policies to promote child development birth
    to through early care and education policy
  • Additional resources from CLASP and ZTT

3
Where are Babies?
Primary child care arrangements for children
birth to 3
with employed mothers
Source Urban Institute, 2002 National Survey of
Americas Families.
4
Babies in Child Care Need
  • Warm, nurturing caregivers they can trust to care
    for them as they grow.
  • When relationships are nurturing,
    individualized, responsive, and
    predictable, they increase the
    odds of desirable outcomesbuilding healthy brain
    architecture that provides a strong foundation
    for learning, behavior, and health. The Science
    of Early Childhood Development. National
    Scientific Council on the Developing Child. 2007
  • Infants with secure attachment relationships with
    their caregivers are more likely to play,
    explore, and interact with adults in their child
    care setting.Raikes, Helen. A Secure Base for
    Babies Applying Attachment Theory Concepts to
    the Infant Care Setting. Young Children.
    1996.

5
Connecting Research to Policy
  • Research shows that factors that promote strong,
    secure relationships and high-quality
    interactions between caregiver and child are
  • Low staff-child ratios
  • Well-trained caregivers
  • Adequate compensation
  • Good relationships with parents/involvement
  • Cohen, Julie, Onunaku, Ngozi, Clothier,
    Steffanie, and Poppe, Julie. Helping
    Young Children Succeed Strategies to
    promote Early Childhood Social and Emotional
    Development. 2005.
  • Relationships cannot be legislated, but policies
    to better support them can through
  • Early care and education policy
  • Supportive governance and finance systems

6
Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care
Project
  • Identify a set of state policy recommendations to
    increase the odds that infants and toddlers
    experience positive early learning experiences
    that include warm, responsive, and nurturing
    interactions with their non-parental caregivers
    in child care settings. Look at
  • Licensing
  • Subsidy
  • Quality Enhancement
  • Steps
  • Solicit input from the field
  • Develop top recommendations and menus of
    potential state policy strategies
  • Gather information on state progress toward
    goals
  • Provide information and assistance to state
    leaders

7
Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care
Principles
  • State policies can promote the quality and
    continuity of early childhood experiences and
    positively impact the healthy growth and
    development of babies and toddlers in child
    care.
  • Principles
  • Families need
  • Options to access high quality, affordable
    child care for their babies and toddlers
  • Babies and toddlers in child care need
  • Nurturing, responsive caregivers they can trust
    to care for them as they grow
  • Safe and healthy environments in which to learn
    and explore
  • Parents supported and linked to community
    resources through their caregivers

8
TARGET RECOMMENDATION
  • Build the supply of high quality infant and
    toddler care for low-income families in
    underserved communities, including those in poor,
    rural, and/or immigrant and language
    minority communities.
  • State Policy Ideas
  • Give funding and technical assistance to expand
    access for low-income children 0-3 to programs
    meeting Early Head Start Program Performance
    Standards.
  • Create and sustain high quality, 0-5 early
    childhood development program sites in low-income
    communities.
  • Contract directly with child care providers to
    provide subsidized high quality child care to
    low-income infants and toddlers.
  • Support networks of family child care providers
    to serve infants and toddlers and include
    additional support to improve quality.
  • Give grants to pay for start-up costs.

9
State Policy Idea
  • Give funding and technical assistance to expand
    access for low-income children 0-3 to
    programs meeting Early Head Start Program
    Performance Standards.
  • Overview
  • 20 states provide funding or implement policies
    to expand access to Early Head Start. For
    example, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Maryland,
    Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and
    Vermont.
  • Approaches that build child care quality
    include
  • Direct grants and support to child care programs
    to meet federal Program Performance Standards
  • Support collaboration between Early Head Start
    and child care centers and family child care
    homes to bring services closer to federal Program
    Performance Standards
  • Funds to federal grantees to expand capacity
  • Funds and policies that help expand the EHS
    day/year of services

10
State ProfileKansas Early Head Start (KEHS)
  • Started in 1998 with funding from a transfer of
    state TANF
  • funds and the CCDBG infant and toddler earmark
  • In 2007, added 1.85 million in state general
    revenue
  • Serves 825 children in 150 child care partners,
    benefits
  • extend to 2,000 more
  • Provides full-day, full-year care for children
    birth to age 4
  • Parents required to be in work or school
    activities
  • Programs meet federal Program Performance
    Standards
  • for education and comprehensive services and are

  • required to
  • Coordinate service provision with existing
    community-based child care settings
  • Share training and resources with the child care
    partner
  • State collaborates with ACF Region VII office,
    which
  • provides funding for technical assistance to KEHS

11
Babies in Child Care Need Nurturing, Responsive
Caregivers
States can
  • Use scholarship and wage enhancement strategies
    that include infant-toddler teachers
  • Establish a state infant-toddler credential and
    supports for participating teachers
  • Create a statewide network of infant-toddler
    specialists
  • Reach out to home-based family, friend, and
    neighbor caregivers

12
Many States have Scholarship and Wage Enhancement
Initiatives that Can Support Infant-Toddler
Teachers
North Carolina and Wisconsin tailored their
initiatives to encourage infant-toddler teachers
to participate.
Scholarship and Wage Incentive Program
Wage incentive program
Scholarship program
Source Center for the Child Care Workforce, 2006.
13
States with Infant and ToddlerSpecialist Networks
Source National Infant and Toddler Child Care
Initiative. As of March 2007.
14
Babies in Child Care Need Safe and Healthy
Environments
  • States can
  • Ensure that all infant and toddler caregivers
    receive age-specific training and have access to
    technical assistance on health and safety
    issues.
  • Require and provide incentives for infants in
    center-based programs to be cared for in groups
    no larger than six children, with ratios of one
    teacher to no more than three children.
  • Conduct rigorous monitoring of infant and toddler
    child care settings and provide technical
    assistance to assist providers with compliance.

15
Babies in Child Care Need Parents Supported and
Linked to Community Resources through their
Caregivers
States can
  • Expand access to comprehensive services using
    Early Head Start standards
  • Build a network of trained mental health
    consultants available to providers and parents
  • Make developmental and health screenings for
    infants and toddlers available through child care

16
CLASP Starting Off Right State Initiative
Profiles http//www.clasp.org/publications/state_
infanttoddler_profiles.htm
17
Additional Resources from CLASP
Reaching All Children? Understanding Early Care
and Education
Among Immigrant Families
Starting Off Right Promoting Child Development fr
om Birth in State Early Care and Education Initi
atives
NEW Challenges of Change Learning from the Child
Care and Early Education Experiences of Immigrant
Families NEW All available at http//childcarea
ndearlyed.clasp.org
18
ZERO TO THREE Resources
  • For more information
  • Go to www.zerotothree.org (click on public
    policy)
  • Sign up for The Baby Monitor, a bi-weekly
    e-newsletter of the State Policy Network

19
Contact Information
  • Rachel Schumacher
  • Senior Fellow
  • Child Care and Early Education
  • Center for Law and Social Policy
  • 1015 15th Street NW Suite 400
  • Washington, DC 20003
  • (202) 906-8005
  • rschumacher_at_clasp.org
  • www.clasp.org
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