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WHAT IS ADVOCACY, WHAT IS NOT ADVOCACY

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Kathy Swan, District Governor. July 2009. Legislative Awareness is knowing the process by which laws ... This awareness or discipline is referred to as the ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: WHAT IS ADVOCACY, WHAT IS NOT ADVOCACY


1
  • WHAT IS ADVOCACY, WHAT IS NOT ADVOCACY?
  • Legislative Awareness and Advocacy 101
  • Created by Denise Conroy
  • Chairman
  • Zonta International LAA Committee
  • March 2009
  • Adapted for District 7
  • Kathy Swan, District Governor
  • July 2009

2
LEGISLATIVE AWARENESS
  • Legislative Awareness is knowing the process by
    which laws are created at the local, state and
    federal (national) level of government.
  • This awareness or discipline is referred to as
    the public policy process. It is the starting
    point for advocacy.

3
LEGISLATIVE AWARENESS
  • IT IS HELPFUL TO KNOW ABOUT
  • The Constitution
  • Federal (National) and State legislature
    processes
  • Local Government processes
  • How laws are made
  • The agencies/departments which implement and
    enforce laws
  • How and when you can participate in the
    legislative process

4
SO...HOW CAN WE INFORM OURSELVES ON LEGISLATIVE
MATTERS?
  • Run a seminar session with invited
    (knowledgeable) speakers
  • Ask someone in your State who lectures in
    politics or public policy or who has a Masters
    Degree in these fields
  • Ask a senior politician how laws are made and to
    explain the legislative process
  • Better still, recruit people in these occupations
    as members

5
ADVOCACY
ADVOCACY
  • Advocacy is an action directed at change.
  • putting a problem on the agenda, providing a
    solution to that problem, building support for
    that solution and for the action necessary to
    implement that solution.
  • expression of support for or opposition to a
    cause, argument or proposal. Advocacy may
    include influencing laws, legislation or
    attitudes.

6
ADVOCACY
ADVOCACY
Zonta International, its districts, and its
clubs are urged to express themselves about and
become involved in issues which Improve the
legal, political, economic, educational, health
and professional status of women Advance
understanding, goodwill, and peace through a
world fellowship of executives in business and
the professions and Promote justice and
universal respect for human rights and
fundamental freedoms.
7
  • Zonta International
  • ADVOCACY GOALS
  • 1. Nonpartisan and nonsectarian - Zonta
    International, its districts, and its clubs shall
    be nonpartisan and nonsectarian.
  • 2. Advance the Objects of Zonta - Zonta
    International, its districts, and its clubs are
    encouraged to support legislation submitted to a
    legislative body for its consideration ,which
    advances the implementation of the Objects of
    Zonta.

8
  • 3. Cooperate with other organizations - Zonta
    International, its districts, and its clubs may
    cooperate with these other like-minded
    organizations and individuals when appropriate.
  • 4. Educate - work in cooperation with other
    organizations to educate people (including
    ourselves) about the legal, political, economic,
    educational, health and professional issues which
    affect the lives of women and the actions we must
    initiate to effect a positive change.

9
  • 5. Well-balanced - When clubs host or sponsor
    educative activities, every effort should be made
    for a well-balanced presentation of the facts and
    viewpoints.
  • 6. Expression of positions involving other
    countries -
  • a. Clubs shall not otherwise express positions
    on issues involving a country other than their
    own, except with the prior approval of the
    International President through the International
    United Nations Chairman.

10
  • Districts shall not otherwise express positions
    on issues involving countries other than their
    own, except with the prior approval of the
    International President through the International
    United Nations Chairman.
  • c. Individual Zonta members shall not otherwise
    express positions on issues involving a country
    other than their own, except with prior approval
    of the International President through the
    International United Nations Chairman.

11
  • 7. Nonpartisan and nonsectarian - Do not
    advocate on behalf of or endorse a political
    candidate, political party or any religious
    denomination. Clubs may endorse qualified
    individuals for nonpartisan positions.
  • 8. Expression of Opinion -
  • a. Clubs may express their opinion on issues
    only as clubs.
  • b. Districts may express their opinions only as
    districts.
  • c. Individual members may express their
    personal views on issues only as private
    citizens.

12
ZONTA INTERNATIONALLetter Signing Protocol
13
  • Club vote - Club Presidents can only sign on
    behalf of club if a motion is passed by a
    majority of members at a club meeting. (Club
    Boards of Directors cannot make policy/pass
    motions or take action binding a club).
  • Advance notice - On advocacy matters to be
    decided by the club, advance notice of discussion
    should be given (agenda items) and any papers
    distributed to all members before any vote is
    taken.
  • Advocate on own jurisdiction - Clubs and
    individuals should only advocate on matters
    pertaining to their own jurisdictions.

14
  • Do not sign petitions in Zontas name - Clubs and
    members should not sign petitions in Zontas
    name.
  • Send a copy of your letter/action to your
    District LAA Chairman and to the International
    Chairman of the Legislative Awareness and
    Advocacy Committee.
  • District LAA Committee Chair Sherrill Mulhern
  • sherrillmulhern_at_yahoo.com
  • ZI LAA Committee Chair Denise Conroy
  • d.conroy_at_qut.edu.au

15
Linking ADVOCACY With Service and
Awards AWARDS/COMMITTEES PROGRAMS
16
What is Lobbying?
WHAT IS LOBBYING?
Lobbying is an organized attempt by an
individual, an organization or groups of
individuals and/or organizations to influence on
behalf of a particular interest all the
stakeholders involved in preparing and passing
legislation. It also means seeking the support of
an influential person or persons and providing
accurate information which legislators can use in
their decision-making. Such stakeholders include
legislative staff, legislative drafters, policy
makers, state legislators, federal legislators,
the staff of various committees, experts and
consultants serving those committees, etc.
17
What is the difference between lobbying and
advocacy?

18
ZONTA DOES NOT LOBBY
We must not use the L word Lobby. We must
remain independent of all political parties and
lobby groups in order to maintain our
non-partisan stance. Lobbying tactics usually
involve giving support either money, votes,
endorsements - or suggesting that support will
be directed elsewhere. It is a political
tactic and NOT one endorsed by Zonta
International. We must use the word advocate in
all correspondence and presentations.
19
In the USA, direct lobbying is defined as
communication with either a legislator, an
employee of a legislative body or any other
government employee who may participate in the
formulation of the legislation. There is usually
a reference to a specific piece of legislation
and a view on it is taken/expressed. This action
is NOT to be undertaken in Zontas name unless
agreed to by the Zonta International LAA/UN
Chair.
20
All Zonta Clubs in the US are regarded as tax
exempt (Section 501c(4)). Any Zonta Clubs
with tax deductible status (Section 501c(3))
should seek professional advice from tax advisors
BEFORE undertaking any activity which meets the
IRS/Treasury definition of direct lobbying, as
this can affect your status in these categories.
21
How do clubs engage in LAA?
  • LEGISLATIVE AWARENESS
  • a. Form a club LAA Committee
  • b. Invite a legislator or other informed
    speaker to present a club program on the
    legislative process.
  • c. Keep watch on local policymaking activities
  • d. Keep watch on state legislative activities
    volunteer as a state coordinator

22
How do clubs engage in LAA?
How do clubs engage in LAA?
  • ADVOCACY
  • a. Do you have an elevator speech for What is
    Zonta?
  • b. Use www.zonta.org as a resource to
    understand how club projects ZI projects link
    to our ZI objects
  • Have you identified a problem/initiative?
  • Does the problem/initiative advance the status
    of women?
  • Does it advance or impede the implementation of
    the objects of ZI?
  • Avoid partisan, sectarian or
    other issues that may divide the membership
    (e.g. abortion, euthanasia, legalized
    prostitution, genetic research, etc.)

23

How do clubs engage in LAA?
How do clubs engage in LAA?
  • If so, (1) Bring the problem to the club for
    consideration according to proper
    procedure. Determine what action will be
    taken.
  • (2) Is there another like-minded
    organization with which to cooperate?
  • (3) Discuss club-approved action
    plan with District LAA Chair
  • Celebrate UN Day
  • e. Participate in 16 Days of Activism

24
Need Help?
District LAA Committee Chair Sherrill Mulhern
sherrillmulhern_at_yahoo.com Zonta International
LAA Committee Chair Denise Conroy
d.conroy_at_qut.edu.au
25
To learn more Visit LAA Committee page
www.zonta.org
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