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Disaster Giving 5302006 Heidi Frederick Research Development Specialist

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Explore individual giving for disaster relief ... Compare disaster relief giving to national giving ... Match your interests (even with disaster giving) ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Disaster Giving 5302006 Heidi Frederick Research Development Specialist


1
Disaster Giving 5/30/2006 Heidi
Frederick Research Development Specialist
2
The Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University
  • Largest, most comprehensive academic center
    devoted to increasing the understanding of
    philanthropy and improving its practice.
  • Staff 50
  • Faculty 60
  • The Fund Raising School faculty 50
  • Budget 10 million a year
  • Core program areas include academic program (M.A.
    Ph. D. programs), the Fund Raising School,
    Public Affairs, Philanthropic Services, and
    Research.

3
Overview
  • Magnitude of disaster relief giving
  • Who gives for disaster relief
  • Explore individual giving for disaster relief
  • How donations are made by individuals for
    disaster relief
  • Compare disaster relief giving to national
    giving
  • What to look for in giving to nonprofit
    organizations
  • Laws governing disaster relief giving

4
Comparing Disaster Giving
05 Hurricanes data are preliminary, do not
publish Source Center on Philanthropy at Indiana
University, 9/11 figures from Chronicle of
Philanthropy
5
Disaster Donations 6 Month Timeline
Source Center on Philanthropy at Indiana
University, Chronicle of Philanthropy figures for
9/11
6
American Red Cross Largest Donations to
International Disasters (in Millions)
Source Associated Press and Center on
Philanthropy at Indiana University
7
American Red Cross Donations to Domestic
Disasters (in Millions)
Source Center on Philanthropy at Indiana
University, American Red Cross, Chronicle of
Philanthropy
8
Gulf Coast Hurricanes U.S. Private Contributions
- Preliminary ( in Millions)
TOTAL ESTIMATE 5.3 billion
Preliminary data do not publish Source, Center
on Philanthropy at Indiana University The
Foundation Center Snapshot of philanthropys
response to the Gulf Coast Hurricanes US Chamber
of Commerce, From Relief to Recovery
9
September 11th Giving U.S. Private
Contributions ( in Millions)
TOTAL ESTIMATE 2.8 billion
Data The Foundation Center September 11 The
Philanthropic Response
10
Individual Giving for Katrina, Rita, and Wilma
relief efforts
  • 63 gave money for hurricane relief in 2005
  • 33 of households gave more than 100.
  • 36 gave between 26 and 99.
  • 31 gave under 25.

Source The Conference Board, survey of 5,000
households, April 2006.
11
Comparing Giving by Disasters -Individual
Donations
Tsunami data is preliminary, do not publish
Source Katrina- The Conference Board, survey of
5,000 households Tsunami -Center on Philanthropy
Panel Study 9/11 Center on Philanthropy,
America Gives 2001
12
September 11th Giving Average and Median Giving
by Income Level
Source Center on Philanthropy at Indiana
University
13
How Donations Are Made Asian Tsunami -Preliminary
Results Do not publish
Source The Center on Philanthropy Panel Study,
2005.
14
Effects of Disaster on Giving
  • 75 of households reported 9/11 giving was in
    addition to other giving in 01 (INDEPENDENT
    SECTOR).
  • 84 of foundations reported their 9/11 giving was
    in addition to other giving in 01 and 02
    (Foundation Center).
  • 72 of corporations reported their giving was in
    addition to other giving in 01 and 02
    (Conference Board).
  • Our research shows that giving to disasters may
    have short term effects on fundraising for some
    organizations, but has little effect even six
    months later.

15
Effect of Disasters on Nonprofit Organizations
  • Based on research examining total giving in the
    years before and after disasters from 1955 to
    1999, after controlling for changes in the
    economy, they found no increases or decreases in
    total U.S. giving associated with disasters
    (Brown Rooney, 2002).
  • Among international relief and development
    organizations the effect of 1 being donated to
    organization A, leads to a decrease in
    donations of .05 to organization B doing
    similar international relief work (Wilhelm
    Ribar, 2002).

16
National Averages
  • - Of those households that made donations
  • National Donations
  • 69 of households donated at least 25 in
  • 2000, 67 in 2002.
  • Mean household donation was 2,140 in 2000,
  • 1,872 in 2002.
  • Disaster Relief Donations
  • 64.5 of households donated to the Gulf Coast
    Hurricanes and/or 9/11
  • Mean household donations were 126-135

17
United States Total 2004 Contributions 248.52
Billion by Sources of Giving
Foundations 28.80 11.6
Corporations 12.00 4.8
Bequests 19.80 8.0
Individuals 187.92 75.6
Source Giving USA Foundation AAFRC Trust for
Philanthropy/ Giving USA 2005
18
2004 Contributions 248.52 Billion By Type of
Recipient
International affairs 5.34 2.1
Public-society benefit 12.96 5.2
Environment/ animals 7.61 3.1
Foundations 24.00 9.7
Arts, culture, and humanities 13.99 5.6
Unallocated giving 21.36 8.6
Religion 88.30 35.5
Human services 19.17 7.7
Health 21.95 8.8
Education 33.84 13.6
Source Giving USA Foundation AAFRC Trust for
Philanthropy/ Giving USA 2005
19
Total Giving As a Percentage of Gross Domestic
Product, 1964-2004
2.2
2.1
2.1
2.0
1.8
1.8
1.7
1.7
1.7
Data are rounded.
Source Giving USA Foundation AAFRC Trust for
Philanthropy/ Giving USA 2005
20
Giving As A Share of Personal and Disposable
Personal Income 1964-2004
Source Giving USA Foundation AAFRC Trust for
Philanthropy/ Giving USA 2005
21
Organizations Receiving the Largest Amount of
Private Support (2004, in Million)
  • United Way 3,884
  • Salvation Army 1,546
  • Feed the Children 888
  • American Cancer Society 868
  • AmeriCares Foundation 801
  • YMCA 773
  • Gifts In Kind Foundation 750
  • Lutheran Services in America 723
  • Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund 683
  • Catholic Charities USA 581

22
Organizations Receiving The Most Funds for the
Gulf Coast Hurricanes Relief Efforts
  • American Red Cross 2.116 billion
  • Salvation Army 325 million
  • Catholic Charities USA 133 million
  • Bush-Clinton Katrina Fund 100 million
  • Habitat for Humanity 78 million

23
The Number of 501(c)(3) Organizations
Source Giving USA Foundation AAFRC Trust for
Philanthropy/ Giving USA 2005
24
The Number of 501(c)(3) Organizations
  • The number of registered charities increased by
    4.8 percent between 2003 and 2004.
  • This number includes some, but not all, religious
    congregations. Some scholars estimate that there
    are 300,000 to 350,000 congregations in addition
    to registered charities, making an official count
    of charitable subsector approximately 1.3 to 1.35
    million entities.
  • A study by Kirsten Gronbjerg at Indiana
    University found one-third more nonprofit
    organizations operating in the state of Indiana
    than were registered at the federal level. If
    the same is true for other states, the number of
    registered charities, congregations, and not-yet
    registered charities could be as high as 1.7 to
    1.8 million.

25
What to Look for In Nonprofits
  • 4,000 websites collected money for Hurricane
    Katrina and 60 were oversees suggesting they may
    be fraudulent (FBI).
  • Always go to the official website for an
    organization.
  • Match your interests (even with disaster
    giving).
  • Relief vs. Rebuilding, Kidney Disease vs. Animals

  • You can go to the Network for Good Interaction
    to find out what organizations are doing for
    disaster relief.
  • Check out an organizations website for situation
    reports (the timing and thoroughness will tell
    you quite a bit about an organization) or check
    out groups like the Better Business Bureau (BBB)
    Wise Giving Alliance, But….
  • Dont worry so much about what of your gift
    goes for administrative costs, consider making
    the gift unrestricted.

26
The Law
  • Any individual can give money to any person or
    any organization.
  • When the donor desires a tax deduction for that
    gift that is when the law comes into play.
  • To receive a tax deduction (which means you have
    to itemize your deductions on your taxes), you
    must give to an IRS designated 501(c)(3)
    organization or its equivalent.
  • Organizations must apply for articles of
    incorporation from the State and for
    tax-deductibility status (501(c)(3)) from the
    IRS.
  • After a disaster this process is usually
    fast-tracked.
  • Organizations are then required to use your gift
    as they said they would when you gave.
  • This means gifts for Katrina relief cannot be
    spent on gifts for Rita relief.
  • Because giving is located in the tax code that
    defines charity, giving must be for a charitable
    purpose. Loosely defined, but had consequences
    for 9/11.
  • American Red Cross troubles in 9/11
  • Reason why many organization stopped requesting
    funding for the Tsunami
  • Your gift must be irrevocable in order to get a
    tax-deduction.
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