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Bilingual Education Program at Texas A

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Title: Bilingual Education Program at Texas A


1
Creating Partnerships of Success
Email bilingual_at_tamu.edu
2
Parental Involvement
More than PTA...
3
Parental Involvement
  • Texas AMs Bilingual Program is a partner with
    three strong parental involvement projects that
    serve over 250 parents weekly.

4
Timeline with Parental Involvement
  • Aldine ISD
  • 1995 to date
  • Bryan ISD
  • 2000-to-date
  • Cypress-Fairbanks ISD
  • 1996 to 2000
  • Waller ISD
  • 2001- to date

5
Funding
  • Part of OELA School-Wide Improvement Grants to
    Districts
  • State and District Funds
  • Qualified Volunteers

6
Benefits of Parental Involvement
  • Affective Motivation for children
  • (Crawford, 1989, Connell Wellborn, 1990)
  • Promotes Academic Achievement
  • (Epstein, 1990, 1992, Hidalgo, et al., 1995
    Suárez-Orozco Suárez-Orozco, 2001)

Parent involvement reinforces L1 development
  • Empowers Parents by Promoting Their Own
    Linguistic, Academic, and Technology Skills

7
Barriers to Overcome
  • Barriers may be in place that serve to limit some
    Hispanic parents involvement (Bermúdez,
    Márquez, 1996 Cummins, 2001 Inger, 1992
    Suárez-Orozco Suárez-Orozco, 2001).

8
Threats
  • inconvenient times such as during working hours
  • material is sent home in English only
  • school personnel that rarely speaks Spanish
  • few administrators or teachers are offered
    guidance or training to help them understand and
    reach Hispanic families
  • often both parents work, and may work a long
    distance from the school
  • intense financial pressures and work
  • long hours

9
Threats, cont.
  • Improperly lit campuses in inner city or rural
    communities may deter participation, particularly
    at night
  • child care arrangements
  • some parents may have had bad experiences with
    schools themselves
  • reluctant to question school personnel
  • lack of understanding of the school system
  • perceive the schools role as
  • that of instilling knowledge
  • often parents do not feel needed or wanted in
    their children's schools

10
We Can Overcome
  • Vargas and Fultz (2001) found that parents were
    highly motivated to
  • obtain better jobs,
  • to help their children with their homework and
    school success
  • the third prevailing theme was
  • parental self improvement.

11
  • Parents needs may need to be met before they can
    fully contribute to their childs education
  • This is not to imply that these can not all
    coexist and develop concurrently.

12
A Successful Parent Involvement Model
Parenting Classes GED ESL Technology
13
CLD families need a new parental involvement
paradigm which broadens the repertoire of the
family capital
  • (a) increasing parental awareness of school
    procedures and community resources
  • (b) providing self-improvement training where
    parents can acquire skills that may help them
    secure jobs outside of low-paying jobs
  • (c) Increasing awareness of their rights and
    responsibilities.

14
NEEDS
15
  • Opportunity for social gatherings and
    celebrations
  • Programs and meetings that directly made parent
    concerns
  • Classes on helping their children in a fun and
    non academic way, yet in a manner that complies
    with the state mandated objectives and school
    goals.
  • Evaluation instruments for the program
  • Constant program evaluation and restructure as
    deemed necessary and according to parental needs.

16
Hispanics Need Technology Access and Training
  • Vast inequities in access to technology for
    Hispanic parents and children

17
Technology Literacy is a Necessity Beyond
Functional Literacy
18
with Home Computers US
1999 National study

19
with Online Services US
1999 National Study

20
Academic and Literacy Skills
  • GED in Spanish - one of our programs is the only
    site w/i a 75 mile radius that offers such
    classes. Over 30 GED graduates. Many have
    improved vocational status greatly due to GED.
  • Individual tutoring for some parents with lower
    levels of literacy

21
English Classes
  • Beginner Intermediate
  • Theme based that focus on real-world needs and
    family issues.
  • Such as jobs, interviewing, health care,
  • shopping, housing, drivers license.

22
Parenting Classes
  • See PDF files

23
Success Stories
  • Diana passed all portions of the GED this
    semester
  • Enrolling in Community College in the Fall
  • At current Teachers Aid Diana wants to be a
    certified bilingual teacher

24
Success Stories
  • Rosalba graduated with GED and is attending
    college
  • Claudia graduated and is now working for the
    school district and attending college to become a
    certified bilingual teacher

25
(No Transcript)
26
Helpful References
  • Cummins, J. (2001). Negotiating Identities
    Education for empowerment in a diverse society.
    (2nd ed.). Los Angeles, CA California
    Association for Bilingual Education.
  • Henderson, T. A. Berla, N. (1994). A New
    Generation of Learners Collaboration among
    Teachers, Students, Families and Communities. NY
    St. Martin Press.
  • Lara-Alecio, R., Irby, B. Ebener, R. (1997).
    Developing Academically Supportive Behaviors
    Among Hispanic Parents. Preventing School
    Failure, 42(1), 28-34.
  • Parker, R., Lara-Alecio, R., Ochoa, S.H., Bigger,
    M., Hasbrouck, J. Parker, W. (1996). School
    improvement ideas Guidance from parents and
    students from three ethnic groups. The Journal of
    Educational Issue of Language Minority Students,
    16. Retrieved March 15, 2002, from
    http//www.ncbe.gwu/miscpubs/jellms/vol16/
  • Sosa, A.S. (1997). Involving Hispanic parents in
    education and activities through collaborative
    relationships. Bilingual Research Journal, 21,
    (23)
  • Suárez-Orozco, C. Suárez-Orozco, M.M. (2001).
    Children of immigration. Cambridge, Mass.
    Harvard University Press.
  • Vargas, P. Fultz, M. (2001). Factors that
    influence the decision making process of parents
    of Bilingual/ESL students to improve their
    English language skills. In Language Diversity
    Network On-line. Available http//ldn.edu/awres
    earch/papers.html

27
Language Diversity Network

28
Language Diversity Network
  • National Bilingual Education Website
    http//ldn.tamu.edu/ (federally funded)
  • National Parent Information Network
  • http//npin.org/
  • National Center on Adult Literacy
    http//ncal.literacy.upenn.edu/

29
  • For further information
  • Martha M. Galloway
  • Bilingual Program TAMU
  • 979-845-5625
  • FAX 979-458-0192
  • Email bilingual_at_tamu.edu
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