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UMBC Facilities Master Plan Draft Report

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Title: UMBC Facilities Master Plan Draft Report


1
UMBC Facilities Master Plan Draft Report
UMBC Facilities Master Plan
Draft Report December 2003
2
Report Organization
Report Organization
  • Description of Master Plan Process and Schedule
  • Observations
  • History
  • Regional Context Scale
  • Natural Systems
  • Built Systems
  • Summary of Observations
  • Guiding Principles
  • Concept Development
  • Analytical Diagrams
  • Programming Adjacencies Dot Diagrams
  • Campus Core Conceptual Schemes
  • 4. Final Plan
  • Taming Hilltop Circle
  • Whole Campus Master Plan

3
1. Description of Master Plans Benefits of a
Master Plan
1. Description of Master Plans Benefits of a
Master Plan
The master planning process examined how the
physical plan can reflect and facilitate UMBC's
academic mission and institutional values. To
address this question, the master planning team
studied the universitys near-term academic and
physical plant needs plus additional "beyond the
horizon" needs. The final product is a road map
guiding immediate additions and renovations to
UMBCs campus buildings, grounds, and
infrastructure, as well as anticipated long-term
campus growth.
  • Four Main Reasons to Create a Campus Master Plan
  • To plan for growth in an efficient and elegant
    way
  • To create a unified level of aesthetic quality
    throughout the campus
  • To attract and retain the best faculty, staff and
    students
  • To realize and facilitate UMBCs aspirations

4
1. Description of Master Plans Benefits of a
Master Plan
1. Description of Master Plans Benefits of a
Master Plan
5
1. Master Plan Schedule 2003
1. Master Plan Schedule 2003
March 17 Town Hall 1
April 8 Master Planning Team Work Session at UMBC
April 8 Meeting with Resident Student Association
(RSA) Representatives (evening meeting)
April 10 Facilities Committee
Observations
April 13 Meeting with President Hrabowski
April 14 Town Hall 2
April 21 Meeting with Vice Presidents
May 2 Master Planning Team Work Session at
Ayers/Saint/Gross
May 5 Town Hall 3
May 8 Facilities Landscape Committee
Concept Development
May 21 Master Planning Team Work Session at
Ayers/Saint/Gross
May 29 Review Session with VP for Administration
and Finance
June 24 Master Planning Team Work Session at
Ayers/Saint/Gross
July 10 Facilities Landscape Committee
Sept 8 Master Planning Team Work Session at UMBC
Sept 29 Meeting with President Hrabowski and Vice
Presidents
Final Plan
Sept 29 Town Hall 4
Oct 9 Facilities Landscape Committee
6
2. Observations
2. Observations
  • History
  • Regional Context Scale
  • Natural Systems
  • Built Systems
  • Summary of Observations
  • Guiding Principles

7
2.a. Observations History
2.a. Observations History
Hillcrest
8
2.a. Observations History farm Spring Grove
2.a. Observations History farm Spring Grove
Previous to the establishment of UMBC, this site
was an agricultural landscape that provided food
for the nearby Spring Grove State Hospital.
Wilkens Avenue was the original front door to
the farm and UMBC.
9
2.a. Observations History farm UMBC
2.a. Observations History farm UMBC
10
2.a. Observations History farm Spring Grove
2.a. Observations History farm Spring Grove
Wilkens
Hillcrest
Academic Core
Looking West
11
2.a. Observations History UMBC 1960s
2.a. Observations History UMBC 1960s
Hillcrest
Wilkens
Looking SE
12
2.a. Observations History UMBC 21st
century
2.a. Observations History UMBC 21st
century
Hillcrest
Looking NW
13
2.a. Observations History UMBC 2003
2.a. Observations History UMBC 2003
14
2.b. Observations Regional Context Scale
2.b. Observations Regional Context Scale
Baltimore
DC
15
2.b. Observations Regional Context Scale
2.b. Observations Regional Context Scale
Baltimore
Baltimore
Washington, DC
DC
UMBC is located at the juncture between
Marylands rocky piedmont and coastal plane. The
Fall Line, the point along inland rivers where
the waters are no longer navigable, was the
traditional location for 18th and 19th century
American cities on the Atlantic coast, such as
Baltimore. UMBCs rolling topography and
landscape are characteristic of this locations
unique geological composition.
16
2.b. Observations Regional Context Scale
2.b. Observations Regional Context Scale
This location is a strength that gives UMBC a
high profile in the metropolitan area and attract
new entrepreneurial partnerships.
UMBC is strategically located on Interstate 95
between Washington, DC and Baltimore.
17
2.b. Observations Regional Context Scale
2.b. Observations Regional Context Scale
UMBC is adjacent to a rich network of green
spaces along rivers leading to the Chesapeake
Bay. These areas are important sources of
beauty, recreation, and biodiversity in and
around Baltimore.
The Patapsco Valley State Park is a long series
of parklands and trails from Sykesville to the
Patapsco River. UMBCs woodland CERA trails are
separated from the State Park by I-195.
Sykesville
UMBC
Ellicott City
UMBC CERA Trails
Patapsco Valley State Park Trails
18
2.b. Observations Regional Context Scale
2.b. Observations Regional Context Scale
Within the Baltimore region, UMBC offers easy,
quick access to Interstate 95, the Baltimore
Beltway (695), and BWI Airport.
19
2.b. Observations Regional Context Scale
2.b. Observations Regional Context Scale
UMBCs campus is comprised of 544 acres in two
major parcels. The campus core is located on 143
acres inside Hilltop Circle. The size of
UMBCs campus could cover the heart of
Baltimores Inner Harbor. The campus grounds are
large enough to meets UMBCs future building
needs. However, creating a sense of
connectedness throughout the campus length is
a challenge.
20
2.b. Observations Regional Context Scale
2.b. Observations Regional Context Scale
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE
COUNTY Baltimore, Maryland (Founded
1961) Undergraduate 9,549 Graduate 2,162
Total Student Population 11,711 Faculty 786
Staff 1,221 Total Campus Population 13,718
On-Campus Housing Undergrad 3,700
Graduate/Married 0 Faculty 0 Buildings
3,029,636 gsf Land 544 acres Parking 6,823
spaces
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK College
Park, Maryland (Founded 1856) Undergraduate
24,638 Graduate 8,551 Total Student
Population 33,189 Faculty 2,467 Staff
4,520 Total Campus Population 40,176 On-Campus
Housing Undergrad 8,266 Graduate/Married 0
Faculty 0 Buildings 11,538,833 gsf Land
1,212 acres Parking 18,368 spaces
21
2.c. Observations Natural Systems
2.c. Observations Natural Systems
  • Topography
  • Water
  • Impervious Surfaces
  • Trees
  • CERA Existing Tree Canopy
  • Natural Systems Potential Limiting Factors for
    Future Development

22
2.c. Observations Natural Systems topography
2.c. Observations Natural Systems topography
looking north UMBCs land slopes continuously
to the southeast with a flat northeast/southwest
shelf where the Academic Complex was built.
UMBCs sloping topography divided into three
zones. The cream color represents the highest
area the darker brown represents the lowest
area.
  • Marylands native topography guided the campus
    development since UMBCs inception.
  • The Academic Core is located on a flat shelf
    between the steady slopes from Wilkens Avenue and
    through the athletic complexes. Future building
    development should take the continuous
    northwest/southeast slope into consideration when
    selecting building sites and creating outdoor
    spaces between buildings.

23
2.c. Observations Natural Systems water
2.c. Observations Natural Systems water
Perennial streams and springs naturally flow
through the campus. These water bodies present
opportunities for unique campus areas that
highlight UMBCs native woodland landscape.
24
2.c. Observations Natural Systems impervious
surfaces trees
2.c. Observations Natural Systems impervious
surfaces trees
Pervious Surfaces in the UMBC campus core
Pervious surfaces, such as turf, mulch, and some
gravel paving, allow water to percolate through
soil before reaching the stormwater management
system or groundwater repositories. This helps
filter out pollutants while reducing the waters
temperature and velocity before it enters local
streams. Traditionally impervious surfaces, like
roofs and roads, can be made pervious though
green roof and pervious paving technologies.
With the exception of large surface parking lots,
large roofs, and Hilltop Circle, UMBCs campus
enjoys sizeable areas of pervious surface.
Through logging associated with agricultural uses
that predate UMBC, the native tree canopy has
been reduced to following stream valleys and a
few major patches within the campus core. Adding
to the tree canopy will soften the campus
appearance, provide more shaded gathering spaces,
increase the campus plant and animal
biodiversity, and help reduce the heat island
effect that is created by pervious surfaces
radiating heat generated by sunlight.
25
2.c. Observations Natural Systems CERA
2.c. Observations Natural Systems CERA
Established in 1997, the Conservation and
Environmental Research Areas (CERA) of UMBC, were
created to support environmental education and
conservation at UMBC. At present, CERA covers
about 50 acres of the UMBC landscape, and is
located in two different areas. The larger tract,
covering approximately 45 acres of the south end
of the main campus, is comprised of a wide
variety of ecological conditions mature upland
forest, early- and mid- successional forest, and
riparian and wetland environments. The second,
and much smaller CERA area (about 3 acres),
surrounds Pigpen Pond. There are also several
areas within CERA where evidence of previous
human occupancy and use can be found. In addition
to teaching opportunities for faculty, CERA
offers a wide range of opportunities for students
and faculty to undertake short and long term
research projects in a variety of disciplines.
Management of CERA is guided by the need to
maintain these landscapes as natural areas to be
preserved and protected for approved uses in
education, research and wildlife observation.
Source
http//www.umbc.edu/cera/index.html
CERA
26
2.c. Observations Natural Systems
CERA Native Forest, Hiking Trails, Academic
Research, Animal Habitat
2.c. Observations Natural Systems
CERA Native Forest, Hiking Trails, Academic
Research, Animal Habitat
27
2.c. Observations Natural Systems CERA
Opportunities for Increasing CERAs Health,
Use, Appeal
2.c. Observations Natural Systems CERA
Opportunities for Increasing CERAs Health,
Use, Appeal
The functionality, accessibility, and aesthetic
quality of CERA entrances should be improved
through better lighting, paving and signage.
Wildlife management best practices are needed to
curb the destructive capabilities of some animals
e.g. beavers, left and invasive plants e.g.
Ailanthus altissima below.
Some CERA paths are degraded, eroding, and not
accessible to everyone
Eroding stream beds, sometimes caused by the
failure of erosion control measures upstream,
threaten the stability and health of CERA stream
valleys
28
2.c. Observations Natural Systems CERA
Existing Tree Canopy
2.c. Observations Natural Systems CERA
Existing Tree Canopy
  • Today, existing corridors of non-urbanized
    lands are poorly connected. These areas are
    vulnerable to becoming increasingly degraded in
    health and aesthetic quality. Isolated patches
    of native landscape are incapable of performing
    biologically as they did in their pre-development
    state. Landscape patches require healthy,
    diverse edges and interiors appropriate to the
    soil, sun, water, and topographical settings.
  • Plant and animal communities are affected by
  • 1) the size and quality of their Habitat Areas,
    and
  • 2) the Distance between Habitat Areas.
  • Generally, greater connectivity leads to more
    robust health.

29
2.c. Observations Natural Systems Natural
Areas Outside of CERA
2.c. Observations Natural Systems Natural
Areas Outside of CERA
30
2.c. Observations Natural Systems
Natural Systems Potential Limiting Factors for
Development
2.c. Observations Natural Systems
Natural Systems Potential Limiting Factors for
Development
Analysis of the natural systems on campus helps
establish areas that may need careful analysis
when building, no build areas, and the
responsible capacity of the land for future
development proposals. Here are illustrations
of five broad factors that may have significant
impacts on selecting future building sites.
2. 50 non-disturbance zone adjacent to
perennial streams water bodies
1. 100 and 500-Year Flood Plains
5. Tree Canopy Follows Undeveloped Areas, Water
Ways, Protected Areas
4. Protected Lands -- CERA The Knoll
3. Slopes equal to or greater than 25
31
2.c. Observations Natural Systems
Natural Systems Potential Limiting Factors for
Development
2.c. Observations Natural Systems
Natural Systems Potential Limiting Factors for
Development
6. Summary of areas that may have significant
impacts on selecting and/or designing future
building projects.
7. UMBCs constantly sloping topography makes
the campus hard to comprehend as a whole. This
diagram generalizes the high crème color,
middle honey color, and lower dark brown
parts of campus. The Academic Core sits on a
relatively flat northeast-southwest shelf in
the middle ground. Future campus building
should make walking across campus accessible
while providing a continuous campus experience
that bridges the high, middle, and lower grounds.

32
2.d. Observations Built Systems
2.d. Observations Built Systems
  • Circulation
  • Parking
  • Buildings

33
2.d. Observations Built Systems circulation
2.d. Observations Built Systems circulation
Pedestrian paths throughout campus
Vehicular circulation
The Academic Core and Central Green already
exhibit a fine network of pedestrian paths.
Future campus development should build on this
strength by creating pedestrian paths that
connect all parts of the campus in a safe,
accessible, and enjoyable manner. These paths
should also extend into the CERA parcels and the
wooded stream valley north and east of the campus
core.
Vehicular circulation allows ample access to all
parts of the campus. In order to create a campus
core emphasizing the pedestrian experience,
future campus development should seek to separate
pedestrian and vehicular circulation, especially
inside Hilltop Circle.
34
2.d. Observations Built Systems surface
parking
2.d. Observations Built Systems surface
parking
Existing parking Surface Lots red and Garage
gray
Aggregated Parking All Surface Parking Lots
Grouped
Surface parking lots require a significant amount
of UMBCs land. The image showing aggregate
parking indicates the total amount of land
currently consumed by surface parking lots.
Although some surface parking will always be
needed on campus, the amount of existing surface
parking represents an inefficient use of land at
a time when UMBCs future development will
require maximizing efficiency to create a
cohesive, coherent, and connected campus.
35
2.d. Observations Built Systems parking
2.d. Observations Built Systems parking
Surface Parking Lots 5,365 spaces
3 Parking Garages 1,458 spaces
UMBCs origins as a commuter school required
ample parking near all major academic buildings.
Now, large parking lots at key entrances create a
negative first impression of the campus. These
lots also reach far enough into campus to
interrupt a cohesive pedestrian experience.
Although much parking has been relocated or
transformed into more efficient parking decks,
there are still large parking lots at key
entrances that contribute to a negative first
impression of the campus. Future campus
development should reduce the visual impact of
parking on UMBCs arrival experience while
maximizing efficient land use through additional
parking structures.
36
2.e. Summary of Observations
2.e. Summary of Observations
37
2.e. Summary of Observations Mission Vision
2.e. Summary of Observations Mission Vision
  • UMBCs Mission and Vision
  • To become one of the nations best public
    research universities
  • To combine the traditions of the liberal arts
    academy, the creative
  • intensity of the research university, and
    the social responsibility of the
  • public university
  • To cultivate the life of the mind

The Goal To create an institution known for
academic excellence, high standards, and a deep
commitment to the common good.
38
2.e. Summary of Observations Development Goals
2.e. Summary of Observations Development Goals
UMBC has already made significant progress
towards the Mission and Goals. The master plan
and future development proposals should reflect
and facilitate the mission and vision. To ensure
this outcome, UMBCs leadership has created
development goals that specifically address the
physical development of the campus.
  • Campus Development Goals
  • Create a sense of warmth on a campus that is
    relatively young and with a scientific emphasis
    and approach, by
  • Creating more residential spaces courtyards
  • Creating more gathering places, both formal and
    informal
  • Landscaping to soften hard building exteriors
  • Creating more pedestrian walkways and paths
  • Closing off more roads in the campus interior

39
2.e. Summary of Observations Additional
Considerations
2.e. Summary of Observations Additional
Considerations
  • Additional Considerations for the Master Plan
  • Enrollment is expected to grow to a maximum
    headcount of 16,000 (1,000 over the next ten
    years)
  • A new Humanities / Fine Arts building
  • A new Science building
  • A new Meeting Venue
  • Potential for a new convocation center
    (multi-functional)
  • Consider needs identified in the Athletic Master
    Plan
  • Consider the potential and locations for
    additional retail clustered to create more
    options for services and leisure on campus a
    retail village or college town

40
2.e. Summary of Observations Building on
Strengths
2.e. Summary of Observations Building on
Strengths
  • Current Strengths
  • Clarity of UMBCs Mission Statement and Culture
  • Intensity and vibrancy of the Academic Core
  • Recent residential life improvements
  • Recent landscape improvements
  • UMBCs excellent location near BWI airport,
    downtown Baltimore, 30 minutes from the
    Washington, DC area, and adjacent major roadways
  • CERA and other areas of campus with a the native
    plant and animal communities
  • Areas for Improvement
  • The quality of the entry sequence does not match
    UMBCs reputation and aspirations
  • Traffic and parking dominate the loop
  • Academic and residential areas could be more
    interwoven
  • Ecological communities could be better
    integrated into the campus
  • The campus could be warmer
  • Clarification of UMBCs face relationship to
    surrounding communities
  • Outward-Looking plan (TRC and South Campus)

41
2.f. Guiding Principles
2.f. Guiding Principles
42
2.f. Guiding Principles
2.f. Guiding Principles
  • Plan the Entire Campus
  • Consider the entire property
  • Get past the Loop
  • Connect the Campus
  • Academic
  • Residential / Student Life
  • Athletics
  • Research
  • Inside to Outside the Loop
  • Environment
  • Community
  • New Facilities Must Support UMBCs Mission By
  • Helping build community
  • Being both functional aesthetically rich
  • Attracting the best students to the hot school
  • Attracting top research faculty
  • Helping UMBC connect/partner with corporate and
    scientific communities
  • Encouraging a spirit of entrepreneurship
  • Supporting the emphasis on interdisciplinary
    interaction

43
3. Concept Development
3. Concept Development
  • Analytical Diagrams
  • Programming Adjacencies Dot Diagrams
  • Campus Core Conceptual Schemes

44
3.a. Concept Development Analytical Diagrams
3.a. Concept Development Analytical Diagrams
This later diagram shows the desire to pull the
campus cores fabric across Hilltop Circle by
Wilkens Avenue and towards Arbutus. In
addition, there are sections of Hilltop Circle in
lighter blue that indicate a more urban character
for The Loop. In these areas, buildings might
line both sides of the street. Other parts of
The Loop might receive another kind of
landscape treatment with a softer, more wooded
feeling on both sides of the road and within the
median. Finally, the light green areas show a
continuum of open spaces acting as connective
tissue throughout the campus core. The dark
green hatching shows CERA and other natural areas
becoming more connected and integrated into the
campus core.
45
3.b. Concept Development Programming
Adjacencies Dot Diagrams
3.b. Concept Development Programming
Adjacencies Dot Diagrams
  • Master plans are concerned with Programming the
    kinds of activities that will occur within
    buildings and outdoor spaces and creating
    appropriate Adjacencies for those activities.
  • During the Observations Phase, five major
    building or development projects were mentioned
  • Humanities / Fine Arts
  • Science Building
  • Meeting Venue
  • Convocation Center
  • Mixed-Use Retail/Office
  • During the Concept Development Phase, the master
    planning team considered the size, location, and
    adjacencies that might be most appropriate for
    each of these potential projects. Three
    scenarios provided diverse approaches to
    addressing the project needs.

46
3.b. Concept Development Programming
Adjacencies Dot Diagrams
3.b. Concept Development Programming
Adjacencies Dot Diagrams
Meeting Venue
Retail
Retail
Retail
Convocation Center
Humanities/ Fine Arts
Humanities/ Fine Arts
Humanities/ Fine Arts
Meeting Venue
Science
Science
Science
Meeting Venue
Convocation Center
Convocation Center
Scenario 1
Scenario 2
Scenario 3
47
3.c. Concept Development Campus Core
Conceptual Schemes
3.c. Concept Development Campus Core
Conceptual Schemes
48
3.c. Concept Development Campus Core
Conceptual Schemes
3.c. Concept Development Campus Core
Conceptual Schemes
This conceptual scheme became widely accepted as
a plan that expressed many of the UMBC
communitys concerns, including
  • Extending the campus core across The Loop
  • Inter-weaving academic and residential areas
  • Integrating natural areas into the campus core
  • Creating a sense of connectedness throughout
    the campus core
  • Extending the strength of the Academic Core
    through a compact and coherent arrangement of
    buildings around a series of connected open spaces

49
4.a. Concept Development Taming Hilltop Circle
4.a. Concept Development Taming Hilltop Circle
Throughout the Observations and Concept
Development Phases, the master planning team
heard that the UMBC community wanted to soften
or even eliminate! the unofficial border
created by Hilltop Circle, A.K.A. The Loop.
This road was described as cold, encouraging
high speeds because of its wide width, and
dangerous for pedestrians crossing the road.
Careful consideration led to the conclusion
that eliminating large sections of The Loop
would likely have serious negative effects on the
campus vehicular circulation and access to
parking, especially during peak driving
periods. The master planning team considered
altering the character of Hilltop Circle to
create a softer feeling that would also act as
traffic calming measures for the too-wide and
too-fast road. This image (left) shows Hilltop
Circles existing conditions in both plan and
section. The two schemes that follow show
proposals for treating The Loop as 1) a
heavily wooded Parkway when adjacent to CERA
and other natural areas, or 2) an Urban Street
in areas where campus buildings line both sides
of Hilltop Circle.
Existing Conditions
50
4.a. Concept Development Taming Hilltop Circle
4.a. Concept Development Taming Hilltop Circle
Parkway
Urban
51
4.a. Concept Development Taming Hilltop Circle
medians as native landscapes
infiltration strips
4.a. Concept Development Taming Hilltop Circle
medians as native landscapes
infiltration strips
If the character of Hilltop Circles medians are
softened through planting, they might also
perform important aesthetic and ecological
functions. Native trees, shrubs, flowers, and
grasses planted in medians or by major roads can
create a warm and welcoming atmosphere while
celebrating UMBCs native landscape. Many native
flowers and grasses also require less maintenance
mowing and irrigation than the typical turf
grasses. In addition, median strips can be
designed to receive stormwater runoff. As
infiltration strips, the medians would slow
down, filter, and cool off polluted rainwater
from major roadways before that water enters
nearby streams and rivers.
Wildflower Meadow, St. Marys Seminary on
Northern Parkway, Baltimore, MD Mown once a
year only (Autumn)
(left) Median Strip with native plants,
Presidents Street, Baltimore, MD
52
4.b. Final Plan Whole Campus Master Plan
4.b. Final Plan Whole Campus Master Plan
53
4.b. Final Plan Whole Campus Master Plan
4.b. Final Plan Whole Campus Master Plan
Long Term Buildout The complete campus master
plan reflects a comprehensive, long-term vision
of UMBCs campus development. This drawing shows
an amount of development that exceeds the
immediate needs of the UMBC community. However,
master plans are most effective when they test
the responsible capacity of the land for future
development. Locating more buildings sites than
are immediately needed for a variety of programs
means that UMBC has maximum flexibility in case
some building sites become encumbered through
unforeseen circumstances. Also, this plan
guides long-term future development in a way that
protects and enhances natural areas, such as CERA
and the stream valley along the campuss eastern
edge.
54
4.b. Final Plan Whole Campus Master Plan UMBC
long-term
4.b. Final Plan Whole Campus Master Plan UMBC
long-term
55
4.b. Final Plan Phasing existing conditions
4.b. Final Plan Phasing existing conditions
56
4.b. Final Plan Phasing existing conditions
4.b. Final Plan Phasing existing conditions
57
4.b. Final Plan Phasing meeting current
deficiencies
4.b. Final Plan Phasing meeting current
deficiencies
58
4.b. Final Plan Phasing meeting current
deficiencies
4.b. Final Plan Phasing meeting current
deficiencies
Physics 70,000 gsf
Physics 70,000 gsf (4 levels)
Humanities/Fine Arts Life Sciences 273,700 gsf
(4 levels)
RAC addition 16,800 gsf (2 levels)
Police Parking Services 54,600 gsf (4
levels) Parking 4 levels 177 spaces per level
to replace the 234 spaces in Lots 3 and 12
59
4.b. Final Plan Phasing for 16,000 students
residence halls
4.b. Final Plan Phasing for 16,000 students
residence halls
60
4.b. Final Plan Phasing for 16,000 students
residence halls
4.b. Final Plan Phasing for 16,000 students
residence halls
Residence Halls 329 beds 98,800 gsf (4 levels,
350 gsf / bed)
61
4.b. Final Plan Phasing for 16,000 students
- parking
4.b. Final Plan Phasing for 16,000 students
- parking
62
4.b. Final Plan Phasing for 16,000 students
- parking
4.b. Final Plan Phasing for 16,000 students
- parking
2003 parking
63
4.b. Final Plan Phasing for 16,000 students
- parking
4.b. Final Plan Phasing for 16,000 students
- parking
607spaces
748 spaces
464 spaces
451 spaces
589 spaces
  • 2003 7,359 spaces Goal 10,000 spaces
  • 7,359 existing spaces
  • 3,260 spaces to be demolished
  • 4,099 remaining spaces
  • 4,099 remaining spaces
  • 5,566 spaces in proposed parking structures
  • 9,665 total spaces in Long-Term Master Plan
  • 5,566 spaces in proposed parking
    structures
  • - 3,260 spaces to be demolished
  • 2,306 net gain

709 spaces
503 spaces
784 spaces
711 spaces
381,800 gsf
64
4.b. Final Plan Whole Campus Master Plan
parking demolition
4.b. Final Plan Whole Campus Master Plan
parking demolition
Parking Removed from Hilltop Circle and Surface
Lots Existing parking spaces July 2003 7,359
Less Total Parking Spaces Removed -
3,260 - Hilltop Circle - 480 - Surface Lots
- 2,780 Subtotal 4,099 Plus Proposed
Parking Structure Spaces 5,566 Total
Parking Spaces After Build Out 9,665
65
4.b. Final Plan Phasing for 16,000 students
other buildings
4.b. Final Plan Phasing for 16,000 students
other buildings
66
4.b. Final Plan Phasing for 16,000 students
other buildings
4.b. Final Plan Phasing for 16,000 students
other buildings
67
4.b. Final Plan Whole Campus Master Plan UMBC
long-term
4.b. Final Plan Whole Campus Master Plan UMBC
long-term
68
4.b. Final Plan Whole Campus Master Plan more
new buildings
4.b. Final Plan Whole Campus Master Plan more
new buildings
  • New Buildings Bldgs GSF
  • Academic - Humanities / Fine Arts
    1 142,000 (4 stories)
  • Life Sciences 1 132,000 (4 stories)
  • Additional 12 1 million (4 stories)
  • 14 1.27 million
  • Residential 22 1.06 million (4 stories)
  • General
  • - Back of House 14 693,900 (2 - 4
    stories)
  • - Mixed Use Retail/Office 1 22,000 (3
    stories)
  • - Auxiliary
  • - Meeting Venue 1 70,000
    142,000 92 (2 - 4 stories)
  • - Convocation Center 1 168,000
  • - Additional 8
    370,000
  • Total 24 1 (mtg venue) 1.2 million
  • Total Proposed Bldgs at Full Build Out 3.5
    million gsf in 60 buildings

Meeting Venue is listed under Academic in
spreadsheet
69
4.b. Final Plan Whole Campus Master Plan more
new residential
4.b. Final Plan Whole Campus Master Plan more
new residential
Bldgs GSF Beds 22 new 1.06 mill 3,549
gross (350 gsf/bed, 4 story bldgs) - 22
demo 215,213 - 921 Hillside, Terrace, West
Hill 2,628 net beds added
Existing residential halls to be demolished over
time Hillside Apartments, Terrace
Apartments, West Hills Apartments
Proposed new residential halls
Insert updated drawing
70
4.b. Final Plan Comparison with Previous
Housing Study
4.b. Final Plan Comparison with Previous
Housing Study
The Master Plans proposed addition of 2,105
net residential hall beds exceeds the number of
new beds 1,528 to 1,768 net proposed during
both phases of UMBCs previous residential life
plan. This excess capacity built in to the
Master Plan gives UMBC flexibility when it comes
to developing new residential halls over time.
71
4.b. Final Plan Whole Campus Master Plan
residential demolition
4.b. Final Plan Whole Campus Master Plan
residential demolition
  • Buildings Removed/Renovated
    Bldgs GSF
  • Residential 22 184,619
  • Back of House 8 61,800
  • Total GSF Demolished 246,419
  • Fine Arts Renovation 1
    86,173
  • Total GSF Demolished and Renovated 579,011

72
5. Projected Acquisitions Spring Grove
5. Projected Acquisitions Spring Grove
Hillcrest
Academic Core
73
5. Projected Acquisitions Spring Grove
5. Projected Acquisitions Spring Grove
Spring Grove State Hospital is a large tract of
land adjacent to UMBCs campus across Wilkens
Avenue. When thinking of UMBCs potential
expansion needs over the next 20-50 years, the
Spring Grove parcel is a logical choice to
consider. Its location near 695, BWI Airport,
and downtown Baltimore, plus the parcels size,
could make Spring Grove ideal for UMBC/corporate
partnerships, as well as for academic and
administrative needs. Spring Grove and UMBC have
a shared history dating back over 60 years.
UMBCs land was originally the farm that fed the
patients and staff at the Spring Grove State
Hospital. In addition, Wilkens Avenue was the
original front door to both Spring Grove and
the farm that was located on the current UMBC
site. The next image shows the 1949 plan for
Spring Grove.
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UMBC Facilities Master Plan Draft Report
UMBC Facilities Master Plan
Draft Report December 2003
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