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Fire Safety

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Fifty-eight students and firefighters were injured - four seriously enough to ... If the cord is hot then it is a fire hazard ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Fire Safety


1
Fire Safety
  • Health Safety Environment
  • UBC Okanagan

2

3
Agenda
  • Case Study
  • Fire Drill Results (05-07)
  • Basic Fire Science
  • Prevention and Preparation
  • Fire Extinguisher Theory
  • Evacuation
  • Disability Awareness

4
Case Study
  • Seton Hall

5
Seton (Boland) Hall Fire
http//www.nj.com/news/setonhallfire/
6
The Blaze
  • The fire began around 430 A.M.
  • Occurred in the third floor lounge and approached
    temperatures of up to 1500 degrees Fahrenheit in
    less then five minutes.
  • Though no accelerant was used, the fire burned
    hot enough to melt the synthetic carpet of the
    hall, causing severe burns to students attempting
    to crawl on the floor to reach the stairs.
  • Most students on the third floor evacuated in the
    thick smoke using the staircases a few jumped
    over 40 feet to the ground.
  • Three students died Aaron Karol, John Giunta
    (smoke inhalation), and Frank Caltabilota
    (thermal injuries). Fifty-eight students and
    firefighters were injured - four seriously enough
    to require lengthy hospital stays and
    rehabilitation.

"http//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boland_Hall_Fire"
7
Seton Hall - Went Wrong?
  • Some beliefs include
  • Complacent attitude towards fire alarms
  • Over 18 false alarms since Sept. 1999
  • Inadequate procedures
  • Delay in reporting (10 min) to FD
  • Inability to hear fire alarms
  • Smoke obscured exit signs
  • Lack of training in evacuation procedures
  • Inadequate fire suppression
  • No sprinklers (pre-dated 1984)

8
Compounding Factors
  • Interfering With Safe Escape Include
  • Panic and confusion
  • Poor visibility
  • Lack of information
  • Misinformation
  • These factors frequently cause more injuries and
    fatalities than the hazard itself

9
Fire Drill Results
  • 2005 / 2006 / 2007

10
(No Transcript)
11
Fire Science
12
THE FIRE TETRAHEDRON
FUEL
13
Fire Prevention Preparation
14
Fire Safety Plan
  • Ensure the safety of the building occupants
    through
  • Fire Prevention Prevent or reduce the incidence
    of fire by controlling fire hazards and
    maintaining facilities
  • Emergency Evacuation Establish a systematic
    method of safe and orderly evacuation of an area
    or building in case of emergency

15
Fire Prevention
  • Check area for
  • Accumulation of combustible material, rubbish, or
    flammable liquids in excess quantities allowed by
    permit
  • Dangerous Ignition Sources
  • Wall combustibles (gt20)
  • Smoking materials
  • Candles and incense
  • Cooking
  • Halogen lights
  • Space heaters
  • Extension cords
  • Flammable liquids
  • Overheating equipment
  • Oily rags
  • Lint traps

16
Extension Cords
  • Rated for temporary use only
  • If the cord is hot then it is a fire hazard
  • The smaller the gauge number the more amperage it
    can handle (10, 12, 14, 16 gauge are most common)
  • 16 gauge handles upto 7amps 14 gauge upto 15
    amps
  • To determine amps for a given electrical device
    consult the owners manual or divide the wattage
    by 120
  • Do not link extension cords together
  • Do not coil/bunch up the cord as this can cause a
    hot spot
  • Look for safety label (CSA or ULC)

17
SSC Fire Jan 18th, 20071130 pm
  • Faulty undersized extension cord feeding
    cafeteria equipment overheated and started a
    plastic container on fire.
  • Sprinkler system extinguished fire quickly and
    water kept flowing until shut off by Engineers.
  • Local Fire Department attended.

18
SSC Fire Jan 2007
19
Fire Prevention (cont.)
  • Exit signs in good order and adequate lighting in
    public corridors and stairwells
  • Fire and exit doors and their self-closing
    hardware in good operating condition
  • Fire hoses and portable extinguishers not
    obstructed, in good order and ready to use.
  • Ensure exit routes unobstructed

20
Maintaining Portable Fire Extinguishers
  • Fully charged and operable
  • Located in designated places at all times except
    during use
  • Requires a monthly check
  • Annual maintenance check record kept

21
Fire Extinguisher Theory
22
Fire Extinguisher Anatomy
PRESSURE GAUGE (not found on CO2 extinguishers)
DISCHARGE LEVER
CARRYING HANDLE
DISCHARGE LOCKING PIN AND SEAL
DISCHARGE HOSE
DATA PLATE
DISCHARGE NOZZLE
BODY
DISCHARGE ORIFICE
23
Extinguisher Classification
  • Class A ordinary combustibles (wood, cloth,
    paper)
  • Class B flammable liquids, gases, greases
  • Class C energized electrical equipment
  • Class D combustible metals (magnesium, sodium,
  • potassium, titanium)

Combustible
Flammable
Electrical
Ordinary
C
B
A
D
Liquids
Equipment
Combustibles
Metals
24
Fire Classes (cont.)
CLASS K FIRES
  • Recently recognized by NFPA 10.
  • Fires involving combustible vegetable or animal
    non-saturated cooking fats in commercial cooking
    equipment.

K Cooking Media
25
Portable Fire ExtinguisherTraining and Education

26
Portable Fire ExtinguisherTraining and Education
  • WHEN IN DOUBT, GET OUT!
  • If the fire is small and you feel you can safely
    fight the fire, use the portable fire
    extinguishers
  • Remember the PASS acronym

27
Fighting the Fire
Pull the pin
Aim low at the base of flames
Squeeze the handle
Sweep side to side
28
Multipurpose Dry Chemical
  • Class A, B, or C fires.
  • 2.5-20 lb. dry chemical (ammonium phosphate)
    pressurized to 50-200 psi by nitrogen gas (8-25
    seconds discharge time).
  • Has pressure gauge to allow visual capacity
    check.
  • 5-20 ft. maximum effective range.
  • Extinguishes by smothering burning materials.

29
Firefighting Decision Criteria
  • Dont attempt to fight fire unless
  • Alarm is sounded
  • Fire is small and contained
  • You have safe egress route
  • Available extinguisher is rated for size and type
    of fire
  • If in doubt, evacuate

30
If Caught in a Fire
  • Stay low smoke rises, clean cool air will be
    near the floor
  • Test door before opening feel the door and knob
    for heat feel the door cracks with the back of
    your hand for heat
  • If you cannot escape seek out refuge area
  • If you cannot get to a refuge area go to room
    with outside window seal door cracks with damp
    cloth material
  • attempt to contact emergency services

31
If On Fire
  • STOP, DROP, ROLL
  • This will smother the flame running will only
    fuel the flames
  • Help smother the flames with blanket, towel or
    some other heavy cloth

32
Emergency Director Responsibilities
  • Maintain the Emergency / Fire Safety Plan
  • Recruit Emergency Wardens
  • Advise wardens on evacuation issues (quality of
    drills) and recommendations
  • Assist in the identification of individuals that
    may need assistance during an evacuation
  • Report inspection and maintenance issues to
    Facilities Management
  • Collect information from Wardens during an
    evacuation and communicate to emergency personnel
  • Report to HSE officer post-event
  • Attend to their station during an alarm, vest on
  • Receive the all clear from Security and relay
    to rest of wardens

33
Emergency Wardens
  • Facilitate evacuation during an alarm by
  • sweeping their designated zone
  • Check unlocked rooms and close doors behind them
  • Knock on locked doors
  • Exit the building through designated exit point
  • Act as the eyes and ears during a building
    evacuation
  • Report to Emergency Director and prevent re-entry
    when building is in alarm
  • Facilitate movement of evacuees to the
    pre-determined assembly area(s)
  • Await the all clear from Emergency Director or
    designate

34
Campus Security
  • Direct Fire Department / Emergency Services to
    the location of emergency
  • Alarm will show on their pager
  • Identify Director or assume Director role in the
    collection of critical information and
    dissemination to KFD
  • Assist Wardens where necessary
  • Ensure occupants remain 200ft or greater from
    building
  • Obtain the all clear from KFD and relay to
    Emergency Director

35
Facilities Workers
  • Alarm will show on their pager
  • Identify Emergency Director seek information
  • Enter the building if safe to do so and check the
    alarm panel
  • Must identify themselves to the fire warden
  • Fire warden will allow entry after informing of
    any hazards

36
Instructors, Supervisors, Event Coordinators
  • Ensure students/participants
  • are aware of evacuation procedures (including
    exit and alternate exit) and location of fire
    suppression equipment/alarms
  • Know how to summon help
  • Shut down equipment (i.e. gas)
  • Report suspicious activities/observations to
    Warden
  • Reach pre-determined assembly area
  • Assist wardens with crowd control

37
What to do when things go wrong
38
Procedures Emergency Wardens
(EYES EARS)
  • Put on vest
  • Evacuate area
  • Check unlocked rooms (do not go in)
  • Close doors behind you
  • Knock on locked doors
  • Leave by pre-determined stairwell
  • Report to Emergency Director
  • Status of evacuation
  • Suspicious activities
  • Go back to post (pre-determined exit)

39
Procedures Emergency Director
(COLLECTIVE VOICE)
  • Put on vest and obtain list of Wardens (with
    areas of responsibility)
  • Evacuate responsible area if applicable
  • Go to post
  • Collect information from Wardens
  • Advise Security, Facilities, and/or Emergency
    Personnel on status of evacuation and any
    suspicious observations reported
  • Forward concerns re evacuation to Health, Safety
    and Environment

40
DISABILITY AWARENESS FOR EVACUATION SAFETY
  • Preplanning - Procedures for transporting
    personnel with disabilities
  • Develop individual procedures in advance with the
    assistance of the Disability Resource Centre
    and/or the Health Safety and Environment Office
  • May include placing individual on non-fire side
    of fire separation under the supervision of a
    buddy or Warden until Fire Department arrives OR
  • In life threatening situations, evacuate
  • Wheelchair bound individuals should not use
    elevator but go into stairwell. Do not stay in
    their room.

41
DISABILITY AWARENESS FOR EVACUATION SAFETY
  • When there is no pre-plan, follow general
    guidelines for assisting people with
    disabilities
  • Identify yourself and offer to assist. Give
    assistance as directed by the person with the
    disability within reason and where circumstances
    permit.
  • Guide persons who are unable to leave the
    building to a designated refuge area or a safe
    place such as a landing inside a fire exit
    stairwell.
  • Inform emergency personnel of the refuge
    location. Do not stay behind emergency personnel
    will take care of the situation.
  • Once the emergency is over, assist the person
    back into the building.

42
Assisting a Person who uses a Wheelchair
  • Some wheelchairs have parts that are not designed
    for lifting.
  • Do not attempt to lift power chairs up and down
    stairs.
  • DO NOT USE THE ELEVATOR.

43
Assisting a Person with Blind/Low Vision
  • After identifying yourself, allow the person to
    take your elbow.
  • Alert the person to upcoming stairs or other
    obstacles.
  • Guide dogs are the responsibility of their owner.
  • Avoid leaving a person who is blind in an open
    space. Guide them beside a wall or near a chair
    as a point of reference.

44
Assisting a Person who is Deaf/Hard of Hearing
  • Alert the person to the nature of the emergency
    using notes or gestures.
  • Assist them to a safe location outside the
    building.

EMERGENCY The right 'E' hand is positioned above
the head. It rotates in imitation of a flashing
emergency light.
45
Contacts
  • Health, Safety and Environment
  • Shelley Kayfish 807-8621
  • shelley.kayfish_at_ubc.ca
  • Dave Cavezza 807-8821
  • dave.cavezza_at_ubc.ca
  • Disability Resource Centre
  • Jess Roebuck _at_ 807-9263  jess.roebuck_at_ubc.ca
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