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CFAR Social and Behavioral Sciences Research Network SBSRN 1st Scientific Meeting Summary Philadelph

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Title: CFAR Social and Behavioral Sciences Research Network SBSRN 1st Scientific Meeting Summary Philadelph


1
CFAR Social and Behavioral Sciences Research
Network (SBSRN)1st Scientific Meeting
SummaryPhiladelphia, PA October 10 -13, 2006
  • SBSRN Executive Committee

2
SBSRN Executive Committee
3
CFAR Representation
  • Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Montefiore
    Medical Center
  • Baylor College of Medicine/University of Texas
  • Brown University/Tufts University/Lifespan
  • Case Western Reserve University/University
    Hospitals of Cleveland
  • Duke University
  • Emory University
  • Harvard University Medical School
  • John Hopkins University
  • New York University College of Medicine
  • University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • University of California, Los Angeles
  • University of California, San Francisco
  • University of Colorado
  • University of Massachusetts Medical Center
  • University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • University of Pennsylvania
  • University of Washington

4
Other Institutions Represented
  • Center for AIDS Intervention Research (CAIR)-
    Medical College of Wisconsin
  • Yale University
  • Temple University
  • Rutgers University
  • SUNY- Downstate
  • amfAR
  • Pangaea
  • CDC
  • NIAID
  • NICHD
  • NIMH
  • OAR
  • NIDA
  • HVTN
  • Philadelphia Department of Public Health

5
Conference Attendees
  • 120 Attendees
  • 17 CFARs represented
  • 14 other institutions represented
  • Characteristics of Attendees
  • 65 (54 ) PhD
  • 1 (.008) PsyD
  • 1 (.008) ScD
  • 16 (13) MD
  • 12 (10) MPH
  • 3 (.02 ) RN/MSN
  • 3 (0.2) MSW/LCSW
  • 9 (7) Students
  • 20 (17) Unknown degree status

6
Mentoring Day Participating CFARs
  • University of Pennsylvania
  • Harvard University
  • Brown University
  • Emory University
  • University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Montefiore Medical Center
  • University of Colorado
  • Duke University
  • University of Washington
  • SUNY Downstate

Not a CFAR
7
Mentoring Day Participants
  • 16 Mentees
  • 9 CFARs represented
  • 1 other institution represented
  • Characteristics of Attendees
  • 9 (56) PhD
  • 4 (25) MD
  • 3 (19) MPH
  • 1 (.06) DrPH
  • 1 (.06) PsyD
  • 1 (.06) MS
  • 1 (.06) MSN/NP
  • 1 (0.6) LCSW
  • 5 (31 ) Males
  • 11 (69) Females
  • 6 (38) Ethnic/Racial minorities

8
Early Career and Transitional Investigators
Mentoring DayOctober 10, 2006
  • Mentoring Day Goals
  • to provide a team mentoring, supportive and
    collegial atmosphere where early career and
    transitional SBS investigators can meet and
    discuss common challenges they confront in
    establishing interdisciplinary HIV research
    careers
  • to assist in addressing this gap by identifying
    promising early career and transitional
    investigators from CFARs around the country,
    providing a daylong orientation and facilitating
    early career and transitional investigator
    linkages with senior CFAR scientists
  • to expose early career and transitional
    investigators to a variety of seminars
    specifically tailored to their needs these
    seminars include crafting a successful NIH
    grant mechanisms for support for early career
    and transitional investigators HIV research
    priorities and a brief review of HIV prevention
    research among (a) adolescents, (b) substance
    users, (c) mental health aspects of HIV, (d)
    women, and (e) international HIV prevention
    research
  • to provide the opportunity to meet with
    senior-level researchers, and prosper from their
    experiences both successes and failures

9
Early Career and Transitional Investigators
Mentoring DayOctober 10, 2006
10
Early Career and Transitional Investigators
Mentoring DayOctober 10, 2006
11
What Participants Liked Most About Mentoring Day
  • The perspective from what really happens at a
    review session and how to write for the reader.
    I have been to many grant writing seminars and
    this was the most helpful for understanding our
    role in writing for the entire process.
  • Individualized attention
  • Tips on grant writing multiple voices and
    perspectives clarity
  • Opportunity to network and connect with other
    early investigators. The video on the grant
    evaluation process was useful

12
Mentoring Day Comments
  • I wanted to give you a heart felt thanks for
    organizing and carrying out the mentoring day
    last week.  I got a lot out of it, from the
    presentation on writing NIH grants, to our break
    out discussion, to meeting so many people.  I
    imagine that it took a lot of effort to make the
    day happen, and I wanted to let you know that it
    was a very successful experience for me.  I even
    came up with a new K award idea!
  • Again, many thanks, Rae Jean

13
Mentoring Day Comments
  • I found the meeting stimulating and was glad to
    have met so many folks with whom I share
    interests/goals. I know that it is extremely
    tough to carve out a 2-day period to accomplish a
    great deal of work, but felt that our working
    group was able to get a good start and make some
    connections with one another. You all did a
    beautiful job of pulling things together.
  • Thank you again,
  • Cynthia

14
SBSRN Scientific SessionsOctober 11th 12th
  • Global Perspective of the HIV Pandemic - Chris
    Beyrer, MD, MPH (Director, Johns Hopkins Fogarty
    AITRP
  • Cost Effectiveness Trials in HIV Prevention
    Studies - Stephen Pinkerton, PhD, Center for
    AIDS Intervention Research (CAIR), Medical
    College of Wisconsin)
  • Factors Impacting on HIV Prevention and Treatment
    Effectiveness - James Walkup, PhD (Associate
    Professor, Institute for Health, Health Care
    Policy and Aging Research, Rutgers University)
  • Examining and Reducing HIV Disparities in Race,
    Class, Gender, and Age - Sevgi Aral, PhD, MSc, MA
    (Associate Director for Science, Division of STD
    Prevention at the Centers for Disease Control
    and Prevention)
  • Looking Toward the Future Strategies to
    Identify and Intervene with Persons at Greatest
    Risk of HIV Infections - Thomas Coates, PhD
    (Professor, Division of Infectious Diseases,
    Prevention and Policy Research at the UCLA David
    Geffen School of Medicine Core Scientist,
    CHIPTS)
  • Defining, Designing, Implementing and Evaluating
    Effectiveness Trials for
  • Vulnerable Populations - Jeffrey Kelly, PhD
    (Director, CAIR, Medical College of Wisconsin)

15
SBSRN Scientific Topics (continued)
  • Community Involvement in HIV Research - Steve
    Wakefield (Director, HVTN Legacy Project HIV
    Vaccine Trials Network Hutchinson Cancer
    Research Center)
  • Government and Foundations Funding Priorities
    and Strategies for Cross- CFAR Integrated
    Research
  • NIH representatives
  • Christopher Gordon, PhD (Chief, Secondary HIV
    Prevention Treatment Adherence Div of Mental
    Disorders, Behavioral Research AIDS NIMH)
  • David Burns, MD, MPH (DAIDS, Prevention Sciences
    Branch NIAID)
  • William Grace, PhD (Behavioral and Social Science
    Research, OAR)
  • Susan Newcomer, PhD (Demographic Behavioral
    Science Branch, NICHD)
  • Richard Jenkins, PhD (Health Scientist
    Administrator, Prevention Research Branch, NIDA)
  • Foundations
  • Rowena Johnston, PhD (Acting Director, Public
    Policy AmfAR
  • Eric Goosby, MD (Chief Executive Officer Chief
    Medical Officer, Pangaea Global AIDS Foundation)

16
Conference Participants
17
More Conference Participants
18
Scientific Speakers
Jeff Kelly, CAIR
Eric Goosby, Pangaea
Steve Wakefield, HVTN
Thomas Coates, UCLA
19
NIH Representatives
Chris Gordon, NIMH
Susan Newcomer, NICHD
William Grace, OAR
David Burns, NIAID
Richard Jenkins, NIDA
20
Scientific Speaker Evaluations
Did the speakers
A. Deliver the information clearly?
E G 85.8
B. Appear knowledgeable about the information?
E G 95.9
N 120
21
Speaker Evaluations (continued)
Did the speakers
C. Make the information meaningful to your
professional life?
N 119
E G 89.9
D. Provide opportunities for discussion?
E G 94.0
N 117
22
Speaker Evaluations (continued)
Did the speakers
E. Deliver the information in a way for you to
understand?
E G 89.1
N 120
23
Evaluations (continued)
2. What is your overall rating of the Scientific
Session?
E G 90.0
N 118
  • How much did the Scientific Session increase your
    interest and
  • knowledge regarding HIV/AIDS?

24
Preliminary Outcomes
  • Cross-CFAR analysis of mentoring strategies
    James Kahn, UCSF
  • Minority investigator recruitment/mentoring
    initiative Michael Marmor, NYU
  • Identified 2 sources to develop and host SBSRN
    collaborative website (UAB, UW)
  • Identified tentative host sites for annual SBSRN
    conference (UAB 2007, UW 2008, Brown/Harvard
    collaboration 2009)

25
Proposed Action Plan
  • JAIDS Journal Supplement (August 2007)
  • R13 Conference grant
  • SBSRN Listserv
  • SBSRN website/web-based directory

26
  • Proposed JAIDS Supplement
  • Social and Behavioral Sciences Research Network
    Research Lessons Setting the Social and
    Behavioral Sciences Agenda for Future HIV/AIDS
    Research
  • Introduction - Metzger, Blank, Wingood,
    DiClemente
  • NIH Perspectives on Social Behavioral Science
    Research in the Context of CFAR - Gordon, Young,
    Newcomer, et al.
  • Guest Editorial - Hoxie, Curran
  • Mentoring the Next Generation of CFAR HIV
    Investigators - Kahn
  • Global Perspective of the HIV Pandemic - Beyrer,
    et al.
  • Cost Effectiveness Trials in HIV Prevention
    Studies - Pinkerton, et al.
  • Factors Impacting on HIV Prevention and Treatment
    Effectiveness
  • (Mental Health and Substance Abuse) - Walkup, et
    al.

27
  • Examining and Reducing HIV Disparities in Race,
    Class, Gender and Age
  • Aral, et al.
  • Looking Toward the Future Strategies to
    Identify and Intervene with Persons at Greatest
    Risk of HIV Infections (Prevention with
    Vulnerable Populations)
  • Coates, et al.
  • Defining, Designing, Implementing, and Evaluating
    Effectiveness Trials for Vulnerable Populations
    (Translational Research and Effectiveness Trials)
  • Spielberg, Kelly, et al.
  • HIV/AIDS Foundations - Goosby, et al.
  • Community Involvement in HIV Research -
    Wakefield, Grundy, et al.
  • Recruitment and Training of Minority
    Investigators - Marmor, et al.
  • Adapting Evidence-based HIV Prevention Programs
    for Diverse Populations - Wingood, DiClemente
  • Conclusions Acknowledgements - DiClemente,
    Wingood, Metzger, Blank

28
What participants liked most about the Scientific
Session
  • Cost effectiveness is a new topic for behavioral
    science meeting
  • Linking this to the need for research in less
    than ideal conditions
  • The development of issues about disparities that
    went beyond blaming the person or the society.
  • Stimulated new ways of organizing how to think
    about inputs into disparity excellent,
    stimulating session

29
What Participants Liked Most about the Scientific
Session
  • Stimulating thought, discussion, protocol/trial
    development
  • Brought out the importance and current lack of
    effectiveness trials
  • Attention to structural factors at the same time
    the speaker attended to individual factors. Very
    complex understanding, which is necessary
  • Excellent session. Very thoughtful presentation
    implemented by new data linking HIV genetic
    diversity and demographic/ epidemiologic-based
    statistics

30
What Participants Liked Most about the Scientific
Session
  • Thoughtful review of the issues and provided some
    new insights on the topic
  • Stimulated a lot of thinking
  • Clear, up to date, included critical assessments
    of the state of the field
  • Forcing me to rethink ideas that I thought I had
    already resolved in my mind.

31
Acknowledgements
  • NIH Representatives
  • Scientific Speakers
  • SBSRN Planning Committee
  • All participants
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