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holy Joe: see quots. ... Holy Roller see ROLLER n.1 17b .

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holy Joe: see quots. ... Holy Roller (see ROLLER n.1 17b) ... b. = holy of holies: see 5. C. Comb. a. adverbial, with other adjs. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: holy Joe: see quots. ... Holy Roller see ROLLER n.1 17b .


1
  • Coming to you from the OED, the AHD, the MWO,
  • and
  • Betsy Williams

2
The American Heritage Dictionary of the English
Language Fourth Edition.  2000
  • ADJECTIVE
  • 1. Belonging to, derived from, or associated with
    a divine power sacred.
  • 2. Regarded with or worthy of worship or
    veneration revered a holy book.
  • 3. Living according to a strict or highly moral
    religious or spiritual system saintly a holy
    person.
  • 4. Specified or set apart for a religious
    purpose a holy place.
  • 5. Solemnly undertaken sacrosanct a holy
    pledge.
  • 6. Regarded as deserving special respect or
    reverence The pursuit of peace is our holiest
    quest.
  • 7. Informal. Used as an intensive raised holy
    hell over the mischief their children did.
  • ETYMOLOGY Middle English holi, from Old English
    halig. See kailo- Whole, uninjured, of good
    omen. From Old Norse heill, healthy. Holy
    holiday, hollyhock, from Old English hälig, holy,
    sacred hallow Allhallowmas, Halloween, from Old
    English hälgian.
  •  

3
  • Function adjectiveEtymology Middle English,
    from Old English halig akin to Old English hal
    whole -- more at WHOLEDate before 12th
    century1 exalted or worthy of complete
    devotion as one perfect in goodness and
    righteousness2 DIVINE holy -- Psalms 999 (Authorized Version)3
    devoted entirely to the deity or the work of the
    deity 4 a
    having a divine quality b venerated
    as or as if sacred relic5 -- used as an intensive mess Thomas Wolfe -- often used in combination as a
    mild oath

4
  • A. adj.
  •     1. Kept or regarded as inviolate from
    ordinary use, and appropriated or set apart for
    religious use or observance consecrated,
    dedicated, sacred.  (This sense blends
    eventually with 3b.)
  •     2. As applied to deities, the development of
    meaning has probably been Held in religious
    regard or veneration, kept reverently sacred from
    human profanation or defilement hence, Of a
    character that evokes human veneration and
    reverence and thus, in Christian use, Free from
    all contamination of sin and evil, morally and
    spiritually perfect and unsullied, possessing the
    infinite moral perfection which Christianity
    attributes to the Divine character. Cf. sense
    4.  Its earlier application to heathen deities
    is found in ON., but app. not in OE. in later
    use (see b) it renders Latin sanctus, sacer, so
    applied.
  •     3. Hence,    a. Of persons Specially
    belonging to, commissioned by, or devoted to God
    (or so regarded) e.g. angels, the Virgin Mary,
    prophets, apostles, martyrs, saints, popes,
    bishops, etc. the holy souls, the souls of the
    faithful departed, the blessed dead.
  •     b. Of things Pertaining to God or the Divine
    Persons having their origin or sanction from
    God, or partaking of a Divine quality or
    character. the Holy Name, the name of Jesus as an
    object of formal devotion among Catholics, as in
    the Litany of the Holy Name and the festival of
    the Holy Name of Jesus.  See also M.E.D. s.v.
    holi adj.2 2a.
  •     c. More generally Of high and reverend
    excellence formerly said of things highly
    esteemed for their qualities or virtues.
  •    

5
  •   4. Conformed to the will of God, entirely
    devoted to God in earlier times often connoting
    the practice of asceticism and religious
    observances now usually Morally and spiritually
    unstained free from sinful affection of godly
    character and life sanctified, saintly
    sinless.    a. Of persons.
  •     b. Of actions, feelings, etc.
  •     c. Used trivially    (a) with horror or the
    like (orig. U.S.), expressing intensity    (b)
    with unfavourable implication of piety or
    sanctimoniousness (colloq.)    (c) used with a
    following word as an oath or expletive, as holy
    cow!, holy Moses!, holy smoke!  holy Joe see
    quots. holy terror a person of exasperating
    habits or manners holy Willie a hypocritically
    pious person.
  •    5. a. In special collocations.  Holy
    Alliance an alliance formed in 1815, after the
    fall of Napoleon, between the sovereigns of
    Russia, Austria, and Prussia, with the professed
    object of uniting their respective governments in
    a Christian brotherhood. Holy bone tr. L. os
    sacrum cf. Ger. das heilige bein the SACRUM.
    holy brotherhood tr. Sp. Santa Hermandad
    HERMANDAD. holy doors in the Greek Church, the
    doors in the screen which separates the altar and
    sanctuary from the main body of the church. holy
    laugh U.S., a laugh by a person in a state of
    religious fervour. holy oak an oak marking a
    parish boundary, at which a stoppage was made for
    the reading of the Gospel for the day in the
    beating of the bounds during the Rogation days
    called also gospel-oak, gospel-tree. Holy One a
    holy person used as a title of God or Christ
    one dedicated to or consecrated by God. Holy
    Roller (see ROLLER n.1 17b). holy seed the seed
    of some species of Artemisia, also called
    Wormseed.  

6
  •    b. In names of plants holy basil, the common
    Indian species of basil, Ocimum sanctum. holy
    grass, a grass of genus Hierochloe, esp. northern
    h. g., H. borealis (quot. 1842) also, rarely
    holy-hay holy hay, Sainfoin applied both to
    Onobrychis sativa and Medicago sativa see
    LUCERNE, SAINFOIN holy hemp, an old name for
    Galeopsis Ladanum (Miller) See also HOLY GHOST,
    holy THISTLE.
  •     c. Compar. holier in colloq. phr.
    holier-than-thou characterized by an attitude of
    superior sanctity. (Cf. Isaiah lxv. 5.)
  •     B. absol. or as n.
  •     1. That which is holy a holy thing.
  •     2. A holy place, sanctuary. Obs. (exc. as in
    5).
  •     3. A holy person, a saint HALLOW n. Obs.
  •     4. pl. Sacred rites, devotions. Obs.
  •     5. holy of holies. A Hebraism, q desh haqq d
    sh m, rendered in Exod. xxvi. 34 most holy
    place, but literally reproduced in LXX and
    Vulgate , sanctum sanctorum, whence in Wyclif,
    etc.    a. The most holy place, the inner
    chamber of the sanctuary in the Jewish tabernacle
    and temple, separated by a veil from the outer
    chamber or holy place.    b. transf. The inner
    part of any temple the sanctuary or bema of a
    Christian church, esp. in the Greek Church a
    small recess containing a cross at the east end
    of a Nestorian church.    c. fig. A place of
    special sacredness, an innermost shrine.
  •     6. sup. holiest, used absol.    a. As a title
    of God or Christ.
  •     b. holy of holies see 5.
  •     C. Comb.    a. adverbial, with other adjs.,
    as holy-cruel, -proud, -wise.    b.
    parasynthetic, as holy-eyed, -minded, -rolling,
    -tempered, -thoughted adjs. hence
    holy-mindedness, etc.    c. holy-maker,
    sanctifier also holy-making, sanctification.

7
OED Etymology
A native word OE. hálig , also Northumbrian 
(whence northern ME. hely), OFris. hêlech, OS.
hêlag, -eg (MDu. heilech, -egh-, Du. heilig),
OHG. heilag MHG. heilec, Ger. heilig), ON.
heilagr (Sw. helig, Da. hellig)  
A derivative of the adjective hailo-, OE. hál,
free from injury, whole, hale, or of the
derivative noun hailoz-, hailiz-, in OHG. heil,
ON. heill health, happiness, good luck, in ON.
also omen, auspice. OTeut. type hailag-oz, the
sense of which is expressed in the Gothic of
Ulfilas by weihs (but hailag, app. consecrated,
dedicated, is read on a Runic inscription
generally held to be Gothic).
8
First Sense
  • In the AHD
  • 4. Specified or set apart for a religious
    purpose a holy place.
  • In the OED
  •   1. Kept or regarded as inviolate from ordinary
    use, and appropriated or set apart for religious
    use or observance consecrated, dedicated,
    sacred. (This sense blends eventually with 3b.)
  •  3. b. Of things Pertaining to God or the
    Divine Persons having their origin or sanction
    from God, or partaking of a Divine quality or
    character. the Holy Name, the name of Jesus as an
    object of formal devotion among Catholics, as in
    the Litany of the Holy Name and the festival of
    the Holy Name of Jesus.

9
Sense Two
  • 2. As applied to deities, the development of
    meaning has probably been Held in religious
    regard or veneration hence, Of a character that
    evokes human veneration and reverence and thus,
    in Christian use, Free from all contamination of
    sin and evil, morally and spiritually perfect and
    unsullied, possessing the infinite moral
    perfection which Christianity attributes to the
    Divine character.   Its earlier application to
    heathen deities is found in ON., but app. not in
    OE.
  •     3. Hence,  a. Of persons Specially belonging
    to, commissioned by, or devoted to God (or so
    regarded) e.g. angels, the Virgin Mary,
    prophets, apostles, martyrs, saints, popes,
    bishops, etc. the holy souls, the souls of the
    faithful departed, the blessed dead.

10
Sense Four
  • OED
  • 4. c. Used trivially    (a) with horror or the
    like (orig. U.S.), expressing intensity 
  • (b) with unfavourable implication of piety or
    sanctimoniousness (colloq.)
  • (c) used with a following word as an oath or
    expletive, as holy cow!, holy Moses!, holy
    smoke!,
  • holy terror a person of exasperating habits or
    manners.
  • AHD
  • 7. Informal. Used as an intensive raised holy
    hell over the mischief their children did.
  • MWO
  • 5 -- used as an intensive
    Wolfe
  • -- often used in combination as a mild oath

11
  • From AHD
  • ETYMOLOGY Middle English holi, from Old English
    halig. From Old Norse heill, healthy. Holy
    holiday, hollyhock, from Old English hälig, holy,
    sacred hallow Allhallowmas, Halloween, from Old
    English hälgian.
  • From OED
  •    1. A consecrated day, a religious festival.
    Now usually written HOLY-DAY. OE. háli dæ
    (dat. pl. háli da um), found beside the
    uncompounded háli dæ in two words (dat. pl. hál
    um da um). In the combined form OE. á instead of
    being rounded to ME. ô, was shortened to a (cf.
    HALLOW, HALLOWMAS, HALIBUT, HALIDOM), giving
    halidai, halliday, until, in the 16th century,
    holy day or holy-day became the usual form.
  • About the same time holiday (holliday), with o
    short, being a later combination and shortening
    of holy day, rare in late ME., took the place of
    the earlier haliday, which however remained in
    the northern dialects, where also (esp. in
    Scotland) the uncombined form was haly day.  It
    is thus difficult to divide holiday and holy-day
    . Under this article are included the combined
    forms haliday, holiday the uncombined forms, as
    well as those in which the vocalization shows
    that the word was analyzed, are treated under
    HOLY-DAY. But mediæval scribes as to the
    combination or separation of the elements of
    compounds were so irregular, and modern editors
    so uncertain, that many ME. instances might be
    placed under either article. 

12
All Hallows Eve
  • Shortened from All-Hallow-mass The feast of All
    Hallows or All Saints. Also attrib., as
    Hallowmas-day, -eve.
  • 1389 in Eng. Gilds (1870) 60 Ye soneday be-forn
    halwemesse day

ALL-HALLOW
  4. All Hallow Eve the eve of All Saints. See
also HALLOW-E'EN
Shortened from All-Hallow-Even.  The eve of All
Hallows' or All Saints' the last night of
October.. In the Old Celtic calendar the year
began on 1st November, so that the last evening
of October was old-year's night, the night of
all the witches, which the Church transformed
into the Eve of All Saints.
Etymology ALL- E1 hallows pl. of hallow, OE.
hálga, a holy (man), a saint. The nom. pl. hálgan
passed through the forms halwen, halowen, halowe,
halowes. The gen. pl. hálgena with -tide, -day,
became halwene, halwen, halowen, hallowen,
hallown, hallon, hollan, holland. 
13
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