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VITAMIN

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Vitamin A deficiency impairs the immune systems of 40% of the developing world's ... By ending vitamin A deficiency, more than. one million child deaths can be ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: VITAMIN


1
VITAMIN MINERAL DEFICIENCY
  • A devastating force threatens the lives of
    billions

2
  • Vitamin and Mineral Deficiency prevents more than
    two billion people from achieving their full
    intellectual and physical potential
  • It imposes a heavy toll on national economies
    and on health care systems
  • It condemns billions of people to lives lived in
    poverty

3
A bigger problem, a greater challenge
  • Threat larger than ever imagined
  • What weve learned is the tip of the iceberg
  • Even moderate and invisible levels of deficiency
    is devastating

4
A Global Summary
  • Iodine deficiency lowers the intellectual
    capacity of nations by as much as 10-15
    percentage points
  • Iron deficiency impairs the mental development of
    40-60 of the developing worlds children
  • Vitamin A deficiency impairs the immune systems
    of 40 of the developing worlds children

5
A Global Summary
  • Every Year
  • Iodine deficiency causes 18 million babies to be
    born with mental impairment
  • Iron deficiency causes the unnecessary deaths of
    60,000 women
  • Folate deficiency causes approximately 200,000
    preventable birth defects
  • Nations unnecessarily lose more than 2 of their
    gross national products

6
In COUNTRY NAME
  • Here insert specific damage statements and
    protection summaries from the DAR and other
    sources that are specific to your country and
    region

7
The cost of the deficiency is hugeThe cost of
the solution is miniscule
  • Billions of dollars are lost every year in lost
    productivity, medical care and care for disabled
    individuals
  • Fortifying wheat flour in the 75 most needy
    countries would cost 4 cents per person. The
    return on this investment alone would be close
    to half a billion dollars

8
VM Deficiency and the UN Development Goals
  • Controlling Vitamin and Mineral Deficiency lies
    at the heart of development. It directly feeds
    into the Millennium Development Goals
  • Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger
  • Reduce child mortality
  • Improve maternal health
  • Develop a global partnership for development

9
VM Deficiency and the UN Development Goals
  • Controlling Vitamin and Mineral Deficiency lies
    at the heart of development. It directly feeds
    into the Millennium Development Goals
  • Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger
  • By controlling vitamin and mineral deficiency,
    nations around the world will have the potential
    to increase Gross Domestic products by 2 to 3
  • The link between anemia and iodine deficiency and
    productivity is very well established

10
VM Deficiency and the UN Development Goals
  • Controlling Vitamin and Mineral Deficiency lies
    at the heart of development. It directly feeds
    into the Millennium Development Goals
  • Reduce child mortality
  • By ending vitamin A deficiency, more than one
    million child deaths can be averted every year
  • Vitamin A deficiency is known to be a significant
    contributing factor to child mortality
  • Vitamin A deficiency compromises the immune
    systems of approximately 40 of the developing
    worlds children

11
VM Deficiency and the UN Development Goals
  • Controlling Vitamin and Mineral Deficiency lies
    at the heart of development. It directly feeds
    into the Millennium Development Goals
  • Improve maternal health
  • By controlling anemia in women, 50,000 maternal
    deaths can be averted every year
  • Severe anemia in pregnancy is known to contribute
    to increasing maternal death rates and to
    compromising the outcomes of pregnancy

12
VM Deficiency and the UN Development Goals
  • Controlling Vitamin and Mineral Deficiency lies
    at the heart of development. It directly feeds
    into the Millennium Development Goals
  • Develop a global partnership for development
  • Ending vitamin and mineral deficiency lies at the
    heart of development. The best hope for sustained
    progress resides in the idea of national
    alliances to press for, plan, implement and
    monitor specific national solutions
  • Such alliances are most effective when they
    represent the range of those who have experience,
    authority and means to put particular solutions
    into effect on a national scale

13
VM Deficiency and the UN Development Goals
  • These goals will not be achieved, and the impact
    of VM Deficiency will not be significantly
    reduced, without a more ambitious, visionary, and
    systematic commitment to deploy known solutions
    on the same scale as the known problems.

14
VM Deficiency and the Copenhagen Consensus
  • In the recent Copenhagen Consensus Project, a
    panel of distinguished economists were asked to
    select a set of top priorities for investment in
    areas representing the ten greatest global
    challenges in development
  • Investing in vitamin and mineral programming
    ranked second on their priority list
  • Only stopping the spread of HIV/AIDS was a
    higher priority

15
Solutions
  • Vitamin and mineral deficiency represents a much
    greater problem than was imagined even a decade
    ago
  • For once the world is confronted by a problem for
    which there are available and affordable
    solutions

16
Solutions
  • Fortification
  • Supplementation
  • Education
  • Disease control

Combined, these methods have brought vitamin and
mineral deficiency under control in developed
countries. It is time now to deploy these
solutions for the benefit of developing nations.
17
Solutions
  • Fortification
  • Adding essential vitamins and minerals to foods
    that are regularly consumed by a significant
    proportion of the population (such as flour,
    salt, sugar, oil and margarine)
  • The cost can be as low as a few cents per person
    per year

18
Solutions
  • Supplementation
  • Reaching out to vulnerable groups (particularly
    children and women of childbearing age) with
    vitamin and mineral supplements in the form of
    tablets, capsules and syrups
  • The cost can be as low as a few cents per person
    per year

19
Solutions
  • Education and food based approaches
  • Informing communities about the kinds of foods
    that can increase the intake and absorption of
    vitamins and minerals

20
Solutions
  • Disease control
  • Controlling diseases like malaria, measles,
    diarrhea, and parasitic infections can also help
    the body to absorb and retain essential vitamins
    and minerals

21
A decade of progress
  • Prevalence of iodine deficiency halved
  • Close to 70 of the worlds households have
    access to iodized salt
  • Severe vitamin A deficiency largely controlled
  • Close to 70 of the developing worlds children
    receive vitamin A supplements
  • Fortification movement gaining momentum
  • 40 countries now have food fortification programs
  • Recognition of the VM Deficiency problem is
    growing

22
Current State of Progress in INSERT COUNTRY NAME
HERE
  • Here outline progress to date made in your
    country towards ending vitamin and mineral
    deficiency

23
A job less than half done
  • Despite the achievements, few nations have moved
    decisively to end vitamin and mineral deficiency
  • Action has often lacked the ambition and vision
    necessary to control vitamin and mineral
    deficiency across entire populations
  • If the goals accepted by the international
    community are to be achieved, action against
    vitamin and mineral deficiency needs to move on
    to a new level

24
A job less than half done
  • Despite the achievements of the past decade, one
    million children still die needlessly every year
  • Reaching 60 or 70 of children is not good
    enough. Stopping here will result in VM
    Deficiency becoming a problem only for the poor
    and will make it significantly more difficult to
    commit more resources to end it

25
  • To end vitamin and mineral deficiency,
    governments, industry, UN agencies,
    non-governmental agencies and media need to shed
    the old thinking
  • Integrated national-level policies need to be
    developed that reach out to whole populations to
    protect them against the consequences of vitamin
    and mineral deficiency

26
  • Use this section to outline specific actions that
    can be taken nationally towards ending vitamin
    and mineral deficiency in your country Add a
    few country-specific slides if necessary.
  • Use and customize the next slides to create a
    specific call for action by specific sectors in
    your country.

27
Everyone can join the effortTools do exist to
initiate policy dialogue
  • Vitamin and Mineral Deficiency A Global Progress
    Report
  • Damage Assessment Reports for 80 developing
    nations
  • A Challenge to the Worlds Food companies
  • A Guide to Media Professionals
  • Other resources are available at
  • www.micronutrient.org
  • www.unicef.org

28
How the tools can be used
  • By national authorities to review existing
    activities to reach the agreed upon goals (UNGASS
    and MDGs)
  • By national authorities including civil, civic
    and educational to review current understandings,
    and make adjustments to assure wide public and
    consumer understanding of the solution
  • By the food industry, nationally, which can
    develop market and distribute low cost fortified
    food products and supplements
  • By communication outlets in public, private
    media, cultural media, scientific and other
    journals. The effort here is not just to repeat
    whats in the DAR documents, but to institute
    investigative reporting and analysis nationally

29
How the tools can be used
  • By UN agencies in their annual reviews of
    development cooperation with governments
  • By bilateral and multilateral aid agencies in
    their annual reviews of development cooperation
    with governments
  • By national non-governmental organizations in
    their development cooperation within the country,
    and
  • By international NGOs in their development
    cooperation plans

30
What Private food companies can do
  • Food companies have played an historic role in
    controlling vitamin and mineral deficiencies in
    industrialized countries
  • It is now a matter of urgency that the benefits
    of food fortification be extended to the
    developing nations
  • Food companies can use and share their technical
    expertise with those in developing nations
  • Food companies can apply their production,
    distribution and marketing skills to make
    fortified foods widely available and affordable
    in developing countries

31
How governments can help
  • Governments can
  • Help build public demand for fortified foods
    through health and education services
  • Assist with start-up financing and product
    development
  • Endorse approved food products
  • Allow distribution of certain fortified foods
    through schools, hospitals and clinics
  • Reduce duties on imported vitamins and minerals
    or on essential machinery used for fortification
  • Legislate in support of food fortification

32
  • Controlling vitamin and mineral deficiency is an
    affordable opportunity to improve the lives of
    two billion people and strengthen the pulse of
    economic development.
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