Colorados Health Emergency Line for the Public COHELP: Addressing Surge Capacity Through Information - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Colorados Health Emergency Line for the Public COHELP: Addressing Surge Capacity Through Information PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 4a13a-OGFjZ



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Colorados Health Emergency Line for the Public COHELP: Addressing Surge Capacity Through Information

Description:

Originally for Smallpox Vaccination program. Toll-free telephone lines ... Call type (WNV, Influenza, Smallpox, etc) Call reason (info, report case, provider ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:63
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 38
Provided by: RMP4
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Colorados Health Emergency Line for the Public COHELP: Addressing Surge Capacity Through Information


1
Colorados Health Emergency Line for the Public
(COHELP)Addressing Surge Capacity Through
Information Exchange
  • Gregory M. Bogdan, PhD, Research Director
  • Rocky Mountain Poison Drug Center Denver
    Health
  • Denver, Colorado
  • NACCHO Metro Preparedness Challenges Webcast -
    November 16, 2004
  • The Demand Side of Surge Capacity
  • How the Public Will Make or Break a Public Health
    Response

2
Presentation Objectives
  • Describe the COHELP infrastructure and services
    provided.
  • Demonstrate the need and utility of medical call
    centers providing information and decision
    support during health events
  • Demonstrate the strength of partnerships between
    public health agencies and medical call centers
    in community preparedness and response efforts

3
Background
  • January 2003 CDPHE RMPDC began a partnership
    to establish a standardized public preparedness
    and response system for Colorado
  • Originally for Smallpox Vaccination program
  • Toll-free telephone lines
  • COHELP - Colorado Health Emergency Line for the
    Public (using information providers)
  • COPHIL - Colorado Provider Hospital Information
    Line (using information providers and nurses)
  • Website - www.cohelp.us

4
COHELP Objectives
  • Develop a standardized and prepared response to
    public health events
  • Provide consistent, accurate information
  • Collect and maintain structured data to better
    characterize events and responses
  • Develop capability and capacity to adapt to other
    public health emergencies

5
COHELP Service Users
Public
Healthcare Providers
COHELP
Clinics
Schools
Health Agencies
Hospitals EDs
6
Standardized Response
  • Call handling procedures
  • Call center infrastructure/technology
  • Toll-free lines with up-to-date recordings
  • Integrated website (www.cohelp.us)
  • Trained information providers
  • Defined referral procedures
  • Consistent, accurate information delivery
  • Structured data collection and reporting

7
Call Handling Procedures
8
Call Center Infrastructure
9
Updated Recordings
  • Consistent, accurate information delivery
  • Customized to address most frequent concerns and
    issues
  • WNV symptoms protective measures
  • Influenza symptoms immunizations
  • Reduces need to speak with person
  • Assists with call volume surges
  • Directs callers to internet for additional
    information (via www.cohelp.us)

10
Integrated Website
Colorado Health Emergency Line for Public
Information - Web Links The Colorado Health
Emergency Line for Public Information (COHELP) is
a public support service sponsored by the
Colorado Department of Public Health and
Environment to keep you informed on current
public health or bioterrorism issues. The COHELP
toll free line (1-877-462-2911) is staffed by
trained information providers who give
information on the following topics Smallpox,
West Nile Virus, MOLD, Influenza and Pneumonia.
For more information about these topics, Please
click on the links below. To schedule a flu or
pneumonia shot go to www.immunizecolorado.com
11
Trained Staff
  • Standardized training program
  • Customer service skills
  • Technology skills
  • Content education
  • Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC)
  • Supervisor listening-in on calls
  • Supervisor case review
  • Co-worker case review

12
Information Delivery
  • All content approved by CDPHE
  • Structured as Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
    and their answers
  • Information Not Available procedures
  • Consistency assured through training and QA/QC
    reviews

13
Information Topics
  • Smallpox information/vaccination support
  • West Nile Virus (WNV)
  • Mold
  • Influenza/Pneumonia
  • Hantavirus
  • White Powder
  • Tuberculosis
  • Topics in progress
  • Anthrax
  • SARS
  • Avian Flu
  • Ricin

14
Information Types
  • General topic information
  • Public health messages
  • Personal/family protection
  • State/local health department specifics
  • Point of contact information for local health
    depts
  • Provider guidelines and information
  • Clinical decision support

15
FAQ Example
Personal Protection (PPFAQ1) How can
I protect myself from West Nile virus?
  • The best way to protect you and your family is to
    limit mosquito exposure.
  • Limit outside activity around dawn and dusk when
    mosquitoes feed.
  • Wear protective clothing such as lightweight long
    pants and long sleeve shirts when outside.
  • Apply insect repellant to exposed skin when
    outside. Repellents with DEET are effective, but
    should be applied sparingly.
  • Make sure that doors and windows have tight-
    fitting screens. Repair or replace screens that
    have tears or holes in them.
  • Drain and prevent formation of all standing
    water. Stock permanent ponds or fountains with
    fish that eat mosquito larvae.
  • Change water in birdbaths or wading pools and
    empty flowerpot saucers of standing water at
    least once a week.
  • Remove items that could collect water such as old
    tires, buckets, empty cans, and food and beverage
    containers.

16
Referral Procedures
Caller
COHELP
Poison Center
Nurse Line
Local Health Agencies
Healthcare Providers
CDPHE
17
Data Collection
  • Structured software
  • Caller demographics (zip code, county, city)
  • Call type (WNV, Influenza, Smallpox, etc)
  • Call reason (info, report case, provider info,
    etc)
  • Surveys (dead bird reports, VAERS)
  • Information management and documentation (FAQ
    libraries, LHD points of contact)
  • CDPHE notifications referrals (per protocols)

18
Structured Software
19
Data Reporting
  • Reporting
  • Call metrics (volume, disposition)
  • Caller demographics
  • Information delivered (specific FAQs)
  • Customized for recipient needs
  • Surveillance signals
  • Information Not Available
  • Survey data

20
Reporting Examples
  • CDPHE
  • Weekly
  • Call volumes
  • Counties calling
  • Seasonal issues (WNV calls total, Dead Bird
    Reports)
  • Monthly
  • All call types, FAQs given, caller zip codes
    counties
  • Local Health Departments
  • Weekly
  • Dead Bird Reports (including address of find)
  • Ad Hoc Reports
  • Call stats by specific countiesNumber of calls,
    FAQs given
  • Top ten counties calling
  • Number of out-of-state calls
  • Top ten reasons for call

21
Call Volume Disposition
2003 Total Calls 36,361 Smallpox 193
WNV 12,555 (2,850 Dead Bird Reports)
Influenza/Pneumonia/Mold 23,613
22
Call Types Agent Handled
23
WNV Call Types Issues
2003 (07-22-03 to 10-14-03) 2004 (06-01-04
to 09-27-04) Calls 6971 2993 DBR 2850
(1 Mesa) 817 (24 Mesa) Top 3 Dead Bird
Reports Information Types Information
Dead Bird Reports Human WNV Human WNV Top
3 WNV symptoms WNV symptoms FAQs
Handling dead birds Medical decision
support Duration of symptoms
Child/community protection New
Support groups FAQs Ongoing WNV
effects Herbal repellents
24
WNV Supporting Data
  • Decreased neuro-invasive disease (621 in 2003 and
    25 in 2004)
  • Decreased fatalities (63 in 2003 and 2 in 2004)
  • Large corvid bird die off in 2003
  • Changing public concerns
  • DEET use in children
  • Larvacides for ponds, pools, horse troughs
  • Community spraying

25
Surveillance Dead Bird Reports
26
Influenza Calls Nov03 to Jan04
27
Mold Calls July 2004 (close-up)
28
TB Calls Jan to Jun 2004 (close-up)
29
Adaptability/Capability
  • Can rapidly change FAQ content and recordings
  • Can handle surge responses
  • Recordings/Announcements
  • Partnering with media to deliver info
  • Capacity pooltrained ancillary staff
  • Can learn from experiences

30
Hourly Call Volumes
Call surges were directly related to media
announcements including the hotline.


31
Lessons Learned
  • Call volume driven by event and media attention
  • Adaptation to local and state health department
    specifics are necessary to meet both public
    health and public needs
  • Surveillancenot the original purpose of line,
    became an important function
  • Ongoing surveillance
  • WNVDead Bird Reports
  • Mold Calls
  • Sentinel event system (identified new health
    concerns)
  • Tuberculosis
  • Hantavirus
  • White Powder
  • Mold clusters (encephalitis, county-specific)

32
Service Benefits
  • Addresses public concerns
  • Supports public decision making
  • Promotes appropriate care delivery
  • Relieves demand on health system
  • State and local health departments
  • Hospitals, clinics, physician offices
  • Helps state local health officials identify
    needs
  • Supports state local surveillance efforts
  • Provides early warning/sentinel system
  • Addresses critical benchmarks required for
    continued funding

33
Strengths of Partnership
  • Model for Poison Center/State Health partnerships
  • Improves information support for public and
    providers
  • Improves surge capacity for health events
  • Expands surveillance signals and data collection
  • Assists the New Public Health Environment
  • Increases visibility (extends response
    capabilities outside of Mon to Fri 8 am to 5 pm,
    improves access)
  • Handles rapidly evolving info while maintaining
    control (assists info management, improves
    dissemination)
  • Aids decision support (can help with health
    disparities and control of healthcare costs)

34
Why this response capability?
  • Public health events will continue to occur and
    will require a response
  • Need structured, coordinated systems for these
    event responses
  • Cost-effective
  • Efficient
  • Accurate
  • Consistent
  • Adaptable

35
SARS Outbreak 2003
  • Mar 13 WHO international health alert issued
  • Mar 14 Toronto (pop. 4.6 million) confirms
    cluster related to WHO alert
  • Mar 15 Hotline established, 0800-1100 daily
  • SARS Hotline receives gt300,000 calls from Mar 15
    to Jun 24 peak daily volume of 47,567 calls
  • Primarily staffed by public health nurses, 46 on
    day and 34 on evening shifts (gt200 total)
  • Aug 30 44 deaths and 438 SARS cases

36
That is why!
  • The SARS outbreak in Toronto demonstrated how
    important a structured hotline capability aided
    response efforts during a major health event
  • PUBLIC HEALTH AGENCIES
  • MUST BE PREPARED -
  • PARTNERSHIPS CAN HELP

37
Acknowledgements
  • RMPDC - DH Collaborators
  • Anna Seroka, MEd RN
  • Diane Swanson
  • Kathy Wruk, MHA RN
  • Richard Dart, MD PhD
  • CDPHE Collaborators
  • Chris Lindley, MPH
  • Barbara Beiser
  • Partners
  • Funding CDPHE, AHRQ, Avaya, Castle Rock
    Foundation
  • Development CDPHE, Local Health Departments
About PowerShow.com