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CALLICPEC WRITING WORKSHOP

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B Identify basic vocabulary, mechanics and sentence structures in a piece of writing ... Will you look for content as well as the writing process? ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: CALLICPEC WRITING WORKSHOP


1
CALLI/CPEC WRITING WORKSHOP
  • In collaboration with DJUHSD
  • 9/30/06

2
Quick Write
  • Write two paragraphs about the content you are
    teaching right now Possible questions
  • --What topic does the author write about or
    describe the basic concept we are learning
  • --What information do I want to share?
  • --What would I like to know more about?

3
  • --What information did I learn?
  • --What was interesting about the book (or what I
    learned)?
  • --Where could I go to learn more information?
  • --One interesting thing I learned was
  • --Id like to learn more about
  • --One thing I did not know was.
  • --The information was valuable because..

4
  • --One question I would like to ask the author,
    scientist, mathematician is
  • --From the photos and illustrations I learned.
  • Look to see how many transition and academic
    words you used
  • Check the readability level of your writing.

5
Student Writing Assessment
  • ELD standards Writing Conventions, Cluster 1
  • B Identify basic vocabulary, mechanics and
    sentence structures in a piece of writing
  • EI Use clauses, phrases, and mechanics of
    writing with consistent variations in grammatical
    forms

6
  • I Use sentences wit consistent variations in
    grammatical forms.
  • EA Create coherent paragraphs through effective
    transitions
  • A Create coherent paragraphs through effective
    transitions and parallel constructions
  • What level is student A? B?

7
ASSESSMENT
  • Assessment is authentic when we directly examine
    student performance on worthy intellectual tasks
    Grant Wiggins
  • Paper and pencil assessments only recall what was
    learned and what they are able to plug in and out
    of context

8
  • Authentic, or performance based assessment
    requires that students actually perform the task
    by demonstrating the acquired (not learned)
    knowledge.
  • It enhances validity and reliability
  • It promotes engagement with the content area
  • It also requires use of higher order thinking
    skills (evaluation and synthesis) and
    metacognitive thinking
  • Writing and portfolio assessment are tools for
    authentic assessment

9
PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT
  • A method of showcasing ones work--who uses
    portfolios in the real world?
  • Demonstrates how and what students are doing,
    what they can do and how well they can do it
  • They show process as well as product, show growth
    over time, create collection of work, are useful
    to review work
  • They provide evidence (for parents and
    administration of student performance

10
Journaling (Teachers Handbook, CLI Shrum and
Glisan
  • Dialogue Journals
  • --Write to teacher or friend to clarify
    information from instruction
  • Notebook writing
  • --record info re math concepts or science
    experiments

11
More on Journals
  • Learning logs to discuss and process information
    from class
  • --Write what one does and does not understand re
    the instruction
  • --clarify concepts info for oneself or another

12
Response Journals
  • Respond openly to any content related topic
  • --respond to feelings regarding use of
    experimentation (animals) or other information
  • --respond to people who say they can read but
    brag about not being able to understand math

13
TASK LEVELS (Shrum Glisan)
  • Beginner can do paragraph completion, cloze
    passages, filling out forms
  • Intermediate can combine sentence elements, write
    descriptions of visuals, write dialog journals
  • Grade level can write journals, short
    compositions and essays with more advanced
    writing research reports, using peer editing, etc.

14
Purpose for Writing
  • Function What is the problem we are responding
    to? What type of writing will we use,
    persuasive, memo, report, etc.
  • Context Did the writer address the problem,
    issue, response
  • Accuracy Grammatical context
  • See writing rubric

15
Design a Writing Activity
  • Select a unit you are studying and design a
    writing assessment for it--a process orientated
    writing task.
  • Make sure the assessment has clearly articulated
    goals
  • What goals will represent students knowledge of
    the subject matter?

16
  • How will you differentiate this assessment for
    special populations?
  • Will this assessment be a group or individual
    project?
  • What kind of assistance will you give the
    students (graphic organizers, research
    information, notes, etc.?
  • How will you assess the work? What kind of
    rubric will you give them? How will you define
    what is important, relevant and acceptable?

17
  • How will you build your students confidence in
    their ability to successfully complete this
    assignment? Create opportunities for them to
    succeed.
  • Will you look for content as well as the writing
    process?
  • If so, carefully delineate what you expect for
    content and what you expect in word choice
    organization usage and mechanics (grammar).
  • Remember that informal writing activities
    strengthen the ability to complete formal writing
    activities

18
  • Remember that informal writing activities
    strengthen the ability to complete formal writing
    activities
  • Look for
  • CLARITY
  • COHESION
  • CORRECTNESS (Larry Lewin)

19
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20
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21
  • Computer game reviews (probability?)
  • Essays (compare contrast, cause effect,
    analogy, classification, process analysis, etc.)
  • Letters of complaint or inquiry
  • Summaries
  • Personal reflections

22
CONTENT AREA KEY PHRASES
  • Anticipate
  • Describe.
  • Compare.
  • Associate.
  • Analyze.
  • Apply.
  • Argue for or against it.(Richardson, Morgan and
    Fleener)

23
I-SEARCH PAPER
  • Extends research to what the student is
    interested in. For example, give a topic in
    genetics, the student may want to research how
    genetics has affected their physical traits. (A
    side investigation.) Application of a math
    theory in real lifetravel, home building, etc.

24
  • What I know, and what I want to know
    (Blasingame and Bushman, pg 87) (KWL chart)
  • Students write a topic paper and get feedback
    from their peers to get feedback and ideas from
    them
  • Teachers have a list of questions the peers will
    ask to guide them.
  • Proper internet search techniques need to be
    taught.

25
  • Sources need to be documented
  • The write-up will be less formal than a research
    paper and can be in the narrative (I) format.
  • What I know, what I want to know and what I
    learned.

26
GIVE STUDENTS A CHANCE TO
  • Make a contribution, share what they know, be
    respected
  • Speak up, provide their opinions, critique
    others, be honest
  • Entertain, get attention, act clever, get others
    to laugh

27
STUDENTS NEED TO
  • Identify the topic
  • Demonstrate their interest/prior knowledge,
    ability to relate to the topic
  • Demonstrate, to the best of their ability, proper
    grammar and writing conventions.

28
MORE LATER
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