CORPORATE PERSPECTIVE ON THE SKILLS GAP ISSUE IN THE SOUTH AFRICAN TRAVEL INDUSTRY - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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CORPORATE PERSPECTIVE ON THE SKILLS GAP ISSUE IN THE SOUTH AFRICAN TRAVEL INDUSTRY

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Reasons for the lack of fresh blood' in the industry ... Glamour has gone no more or very few industry. functions, FAM trips, or incentives ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: CORPORATE PERSPECTIVE ON THE SKILLS GAP ISSUE IN THE SOUTH AFRICAN TRAVEL INDUSTRY


1
  • CORPORATE PERSPECTIVE ON THE SKILLS GAP ISSUE IN
    THE SOUTH AFRICAN TRAVEL INDUSTRY

2
AGENDA
  • Overview
  • Reasons for the lack of fresh blood in the
    industry
  • Affect of the skills gap on the corporate
    environment
  • Future of Travel Industry
  • Travel Agent myths realities
  • Possible solutions

3
  • OVERVIEW
  • These days, one of the hottest commodities in
    business is skilled
  • staff.
  • Employee retention is key to continued success
    for any industry.
  • The biggest concern is the lack of effectively
    trained staff entering
  • the travel industry. With the continuous
    evolution of the industry, the
  • need to attract young workers with effective
    education and skills is fast
  • becoming a difficult task to accomplish.
  • It was just a matter of time before the old
    workers started
  • drifting out to sea. It's going to take a pretty
    impressive
  • tactical net to reel them back in.

4
LACK OF FRESH BLOOD IN THE INDUSTRY
  • Glamour has gone no more or very few industry
  • functions, FAM trips, or incentives
  • Misperception that Travel has no future due to
    technology
  • Poor remuneration does not warrant the high
    stress levels
  • salaries were not adjusted accordingly when
    benefits decreased
  • Industry not promoted to its fullest at High
    School level
  • Young people do not want to start at the bottom
  • crawl before run

5
AFFECT ON CORPORATE ENVIRONMENT
  • A disengaged and non-progressing workforce
    jeopardises the chances
  • of raising the rate of productivity.
  • The consultants with a lower level of skill are
    "forced" to take on "senior
  • work load without the necessary training and
    experience cant cope -
  • Result under performance resignation. No
    time for trust to be build
  • between consultants.
  • High staff turnover results in the corporate
    traveler loosing trust in the
  • agent and seek alternative booking methods i.e.
    Internet etc.
  • Staff out of office to receive training no
    proper handover traveler left
  • in the dark service levels drop lack of trust
    teamwork.
  • Instead of having a capable person to assist
    Senior staff they do training and
  • we are not all trainers take it upon themselves
    to do the job at hand as there is
  • no room for Errors over exerted resources.

6
THE FUTURE OF THE INDUSTRY
  • When the airlines cut travel agency commissions,
    and the "dot-coms
  • began to offer airfares on the Internet, the
    initial public reaction was,
  • "That's the end of the travel agency industry."
  • The demise of the travel agency has been greatly
    exaggerated.
  • Why be so optimistic about the travel agency
    industry's future?
  • Because it is ripe with growth potential. Agents
    have the power, and the
  • power is customer loyalty.
  • The travel agent of today, and the future, is an
    agent
  • of the consumer.

7
  • Travel Agent Myths and Realities
  • Myth Travel agents are just glorified sellers
    of airline tickets and their time has come and
    gone.
  • Reality Travel agents are professionals who
    provide value by helping consumers cut through
    the clutter and save time and money. They act as
    travel counselors, offering personal service for
    their clients.
  • Myth The Internet will replace the need for
    travel agents.
  • Reality When it comes to booking travel, travel
    agents are experienced professionals. There are
    some things technology cannot replicate, and
    personal touch is one of them. The Internet is a
    valuable resource, but it cannot replace the
    expertise, guidance and personal service of a
    travel agent. At a time when travelers are
    stressed out with hectic schedules, travel agents
    have all of the information at their fingertips,
    saving valuable hours of surfing the Web. Agents
    also can offer insider tips generally based on
    personal experience.

8
  • Myth All travel agencies and agents are the
    same.
  • Reality Every travel agency is different and
    accordingly, some are
  • better suited to a given consumer than others.
  • There are a host of compelling reasons to use a
    travel agent-
  • Travel agents are out to find the consumer the
    best
  • rate available. Convenient one-stop shopping.
    Agents are there
  • to save you money as well as time.
  • Customer advocacy
  • Expert guidance
  • Personalized service
  • Professional advice
  • Time
  • Unbiased information

9
POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS
  • What it boils down to is this If employees are
    overworked, they can't balance
  • the rest of their lives, no matter how many perks
    we give them.
  • It's as if we've said We'll give you a gourmet
    meal but no time to enjoy it. Talk
  • about dangling a carrot on a stick.
  • We are asking people to perform difficult work,
    and that is all. We need to
  • honor them for the difficult work they do by
    paying them more and perhaps
  • giving them special privileges. Offer to teach
    them, with pay, so they can
  • qualify for better jobs in the industry.
  • Increase their pay after they have been with the
    company for one month, two
  • months and three months. If most of these workers
    are gone before their fourth
  • month, make the bonus at the fourth, fifth and
    six months much stronger than in
  • the early months.

10
  • If we want to retain our best performers, we must
    keep them trained
  • and entertained through a variety of innovative
    communications
  • initiatives and, above all, show we care. Put the
    FUN back in travel.
  • Train your supervisors to respect these employees
    as if they are special,
  • because they must be special to do this kind of
    job.
  • Usually when an employee resigns, they are
    quitting their supervisor, not
  • necessarily the company.
  • Quote from Senior Travel professional
  • The best office that Ive ever worked at (been
    around believe me)
  • was an office where all the consultant were GOOD
    seniors. Training was
  • ongoing. Management knew the trade and was
    always up to date and
  • had brilliant business skills. Front back
    office worked as a team (not
  • my job did not exist). BEST of all we were
    all friends and stood
  • together through the HECTIC times. If we can
    have that back

11
  • Step One
  • Determine what motivates your individual
    employees. For most
  • employees, money is not the key issue
    relationships, fulfillment and
  • recognition are.
  • Step Two
  • Notice how much recognition an employee needs.
    Some employees
  • can go years without praise, whereas others will
    leave after six months.
  • Step Three
  • Understand that many employees are motivated by
    their social network
  • at work. Encourage activities that make your
    employees feel like valued
  • members of a team.
  • Step Four
  • Realize that incentives don't have to be huge. A
    surprise gift certificate
  • for the local beauty parlor in the monthly pay
    slip will generate positive
  • feelings.
  • Step Five
  • Make benefits more accessible. If your company
    reimburses tuition for
  • college courses, have a college administrator
    come to your company
  • so employees can find out about classes and
    programs.

12
  • Step Six
  • Consider job sharing and other flexible working
    arrangements. Consider
  • building cross-training programs for employees to
    support professional
  • development while also reducing turnover.
    "In-office training sessions" or
  • on the job training
  • Step Seven
  • Offer profit sharing incentives to encourage
    longevity.
  • Step Eight
  • Create clear career paths at the company. Hold
    managers/supervisors
  • accountable for ensuring that employees have a
    clear professional
  • growth plan that is monitored consistently.
  • Step Nine
  • FAM trips - destination the most important factor
    when selecting a FAM.
  • Tips Warnings
  • Have other managers praise an employee's work.
    This lets him know that
  • you've spread the good word about him to other
    departments.
  • Be sensitive to the balance between work and
    private life. Employees
  • can work 70-hour weeks for only so long.

13
  • TRAIN, REWARD RETAIN
  • THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME
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