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Chapter 1 Introduction to Marketing

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Healthcare innovations Pharmacogenomics Nanotechnology Rising global competition Medical tourism Thailand, India, ... teachers 4 31 65 Medical doctors 4 28 67 ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Chapter 1 Introduction to Marketing


1
Chapter 1Introduction to Marketing
  • Chapter 1 slides for Marketing for Pharmacists,
    2nd Edition

2
Learning Objectives
  • Define the term marketing.
  • Describe four key elements associated with the
    act of marketing.
  • Compare and contrast transactional marketing and
    relationship marketing.
  • Analyze some of the misconceptions surrounding
    the practice of marketing.
  • Justify the need for pharmacists to market
    themselves and their services.
  • Differentiate various approaches to marketing
    from the marketing concept.
  • Assess key obstacles to the marketing of
    pharmacists professional services.

3
Basic Marketing Principles
  • What is marketing?
  • And why does it have such a bad reputation?

TIP Marketing is not bad --- only some
marketers.
4
Honesty and Ethical Ratings of People in
Different Professions,
2005 Gallup Poll
 
  Very high/ Average Low/
  High   Very low
Nurses 82 15 3
Pharmacists 67 28 4
Medical doctors 65 31 4
High school teachers 64 27 7
Policemen 61 31 8
Clergy 54 35 8
Bankers 41 48 10
Journalists 28 44 27
Lawyers 18 46 35
Congressmen 14 44 41
Advertising practitioners 11 50 35
Car salesmen 8 41 49
Telemarketers 7 31 60
5
How have marketers benefited you and society?
6
Whether marketing is good or bad depends on
how it is practiced.
TIP Actual practice depends on your
approach.
7
Marketing Defined
TIP Its all about exchanges.
8
Definition of marketing
Exchanges between people in which something of
value is traded for the purpose of satisfying
needs and wants
9
Pharmacist exchanges
  • Dispensing a drug
  • Helping patients select OTC medications
  • Providing drug information to patients or health
    care professionals
  • Taking a patients blood pressure
  • Counseling patients about drug regimens

10
Pharmacists have exchanges with
  • Patients
  • Physicians
  • Third-party insurers
  • Their employer
  • Their boss
  • Pharmacist co-workers

11
Transactional versus Relationship Marketing
12
Two ways of looking at marketing exchanges
(a.k.a. transactions)
  • Way 1 Isolated, individual transactions
    participants never expect to do business again
    (transactional marketing )
  • Way 2 Series of transactions over time
  • Called relationship marketing (RM)
  • RM focuses on developing long-term relationship
    (i.e., customer loyalty)

13
Relationship marketing
  • Parties focus less on bargaining hard for deals
    and more on meeting the needs of the other party.
  • Marketers cultivate relationships over time that
    will benefit both parties.
  • The choice
  • Transactional marketing get what you can and
    get the patient out of the door
  • Relationship marketing every interaction with a
    customer is an opportunity to help the customer
    and strengthen the relationship

14
Characteristics of
  • Pharmaceutical Care
  • Establish therapeutic relationship
  • Assess and record patient needs.
  • Create an individualized care plan.
  • Delegate clerical tasks to free up time for
    professional duties.
  • Monitor impact on patient outcomes.
  • Relationship Marketing
  • Develop a relationship with customer.
  • Collect and manage customer information.
  • Individualize your services to customers.
  • Involve front-line personnel.
  • Emphasize long-term outcomes.

15
Is pharmacy practice predominantly transactional
or relationship-oriented?
16
Every pharmacist is a marketer.
17
Everything pharmacists do can be called marketing
  • Dispensing a prescription drug
  • C Assisting patients in the selection of OTC
    medications
  • C Providing drug info to patients or health care
    professionals
  • C Taking a patients blood pressure
  • C Counseling patients about drug regimens
  • C Recruiting pharmacists for a new job
  • C Educating pharmacy students

18
Why study marketing?
  • Marketing is
  • A way of problem solving in the real world
  • A way of influencing others
  • Application of marketing can
  • Help you get the job you want
  • Make you a more effective pharmacist

19
Misconceptions about Marketing
20
Misconceptions about marketing
  • Marketing is selling or advertising.

21
Marketing Research
Pricing
Selling
Marketing
Merchandising
Advertising
Distribution
22
Other misconceptions about marketing
  • Marketing is evil.
  • Health care professionals do not need to market.
  • Employee pharmacists do not need to market.
  • Only retail pharmacists need to market.

23
Approaches to Addressing Marketing Problems in
Pharmacy
  • The way you approach a problem will determine how
    it is solved.

24
Some process-centered approaches to marketing
  • Production fast and cheap
  • Sales fast and cheap with heavy selling
  • Product better mousetrap

25
Customer-centered approaches to marketing
  • Marketing concept
  • Needs and wants
  • Targeted customers
  • Products and services that satisfy
  • Societal marketing
  • Considers societal impact

26
What is the dominant approach in pharmacy
practice?
  • What is your approach?

27
Major Trends that Will Affect Pharmacist Practice
28
Consumer-driven health care (CDHC)
Cost sharing
Disease/wellness management
29
Aging of the baby boomers
  • Retirement of post-World War II baby boom
    generation
  • Demanding, activists
  • Unwilling to accept health care status quo
  • Expect to live longer and healthier lives
    throughout their retirement

30
Around-the-clock society
  • People expect services and products 24/7/365.
  • Convenience is no longer an option in pharmacy
    practice.
  • Hours
  • Location
  • Speed
  • Choice

31
Service technology
  • Voice-operated telephone and information systems
  • Bar-code and RFID tracking
  • Robotics

32
Service technologyRobotics
33
Using Technology to Serve Patients
Speed service Touch-screen interactive kiosks Electronic refill reminders Electronic prescribing, fax prescribing ATM-like dispensing machines
Increase service Convenience/accessibility Telepharmacy, telephone call centers Internet pharmacy Touch-screen interactive kiosks Diagnostic technologies (e.g., blood pressure machine) Videos and other educational technologies Web education, CD ROMs
Customize service Personalized patient e-profiles Customer relationship management (CRM) cards Interactive kiosks Interactive Web pages
Improve service quality, solve drug-related problems Telephone call centers Electronic prescribing
Maintain a patient relationship Personalized patient e-profiles CRM cards Web support groups
34
Health care budgetary constraints
  • Rising health care expenditures concern
    government and other payers.
  • Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, and other
    funding responsibilities
  • Funding battle among health care providers
  • Health care marketers must compete for funds.

35
Healthcare innovations
  • Pharmacogenomics
  • Nanotechnology

36
Rising global competition
  • Medical tourism
  • Thailand, India, Malaysia, Mexico, and Canada
    competing for the U.S. health care dollar
  • Patients without health care insurance or
    large-deductible health insurance plans
  • Drug importation/exportation
  • Large cross-border price differentials

37
Key problems with marketing pharmacist services
  • Control of practice by nonpharmacists
  • Product orientation
  • Conflicting professional and merchant roles
  • Poorly defined image of pharmacists among public
  • Pharmacist shortages
  • Silos of health care

38
Demand for pharmacists
  • New pharmacies opening daily
  • Pharmacist shortages
  • Rising pay
  • Overwork
  • Changing responsibilities

39
Nursing Home
Home Health
Insurer
Pharmacy
Drs Office
Hospital
40
Conclusion
  • Marketing can change your way of thinking about
    current pharmacy practice.
  • The goal of this course is to help you develop a
    marketing mindset.
  • Application of marketing principles can help you
    change pharmacy practice.
  • Marketing can give you the tools to successfully
    promote yourself, your ideas, and the profession.

41
Questions?
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