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A Study Of The Apostle Pauls Letter To The Hebrews

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Superior to Angels (1:4 2:18) Superior to Moses (3:1-19) Superior ... our hearts sprinkled from an evil con-science and our bodies washed ... of evil/sin. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: A Study Of The Apostle Pauls Letter To The Hebrews


1
AStudyOf TheApostlePauls LetterTo The
Hebrews
How can we neglect so greata salvation?
Hebrews 23
2
Hebrews Christ Is Superior! Superior Person
(11413) Superior to Prophets
(11-3) Superior to Angels (14218) Superior
to Moses (31-19) Superior to Joshua
(41-13) Superior Priest (414728) Superior to
Aaron (414612) Superior to Melchizedek
(61375) Superior to Levi (76-28)
3
Hebrews Christ Is Superior! Superior Pact to
Moses (811018) Superior Promises
(81-13) Superior Sanctuary (91-14) Superior
Sacrifice (915-28) Superior Results
(101-18) Superior Principle (Faith) to Moses
(10191325) Superior Things (1019-39) but
Well only get to verses 19-31 today. Superior
Actions (111-40) Superior Relationship
(121-29) Superior Way of Life (131-25)
4
Therefore, breth-ren, having bold-ness to enter
the Holiest by the blood of Jesus, by a new and
living way which He con- secrated for us, through
the veil, that is His flesh, and having a High
Priest over the house of God
Hebrews 1019-21 ? ? ?
5
Therefore, breth-ren, having bold-ness to enter
the Holiest by the blood of Jesus, by a new and
living way which He con- secrated for us, through
the veil, that is His flesh, and having a High
Priest over the house of God
Because death was the penalty, OT wor-shippers
werent bold enough to enter into the holy of
holiesinto Gods presence, but after Christs
sacrifice they could and did have boldness to
enter into Gods presence.
6
Speaking of Jesus, in Ephesians 312 Paul wrote
that through Him we have boldness and access with
confidence through faith in Him.
7
Therefore, breth-ren, having bold-ness to enter
the Holiest by the blood of Jesus, by a new and
living way which He con- secrated for us, through
the veil, that is His flesh, and having a High
Priest over the house of God
New literally means freshly-slain. So while in
the OT times the high priest sprinkled the blood
of the sacrifice on the ground 7 times on his way
to Gods typical dwelling place (Lev. 1614),
to-day we have Jesus blood leading us into the
real thing (cf. Leader in 210).
8
Therefore, breth-ren, having bold-ness to enter
the Holiest by the blood of Jesus, by a new and
living way which He con- secrated for us, through
the veil, that is His flesh, and having a High
Priest over the house of God
This verse is saying essentially the same thing
that Jesus Himself said I am the Way (John
146) i.e., Hes the freshly -slain way, who
(un-like the OT slain) still lives! And since
Hes a living sacrifice (being always
freshly-slain), no other sac-rifice is necessary!
9
Therefore, breth-ren, having bold-ness to enter
the Holiest by the blood of Jesus, by a new and
living way which He con- secrated for us, through
the veil, that is His flesh, and having a High
Priest over the house of God
This refers to the fact that Christs blood has
set apart or dedicated (as in 918) this way for
us i.e., this way is the way (Acts 92) that He
established or opened up for business for us.
10
Therefore, breth-ren, having bold-ness to enter
the Holiest by the blood of Jesus, by a new and
living way which He con- secrated for us, through
the veil, that is His flesh, and having a High
Priest over the house of God
By this phrase Paul reminded them of the veil
that barred mans access to God, the veil that
the high priest pushed aside as he entered the
holy of holies. Similarly ? ? ?
11
Until Jesus humanity was put aside on the cross,
we were barred from access to Godan uncrucified
Savior wouldve been no savior at all so once we
destroyed His body, God de-stroyed the inner veil
of the temple (Mat. 2751).
12
Paul seemed to be saying the same thing here that
he said in verses 5-10 i.e., by Jesus taking
upon Himself a human form, He could and did
sacri-fice Himself that He, through His shed
blood, death, and resurrection might take away
the first way (the old and dead way) in order to
establish the second way (the new and living way).
13
Therefore, breth-ren, having bold-ness to enter
the Holiest by the blood of Jesus, by a new and
living way which He con- secrated for us, through
the veil, that is His flesh, and having a High
Priest over the house of God
This is actually the one place where Paul used
the phrase a great priest in-stead of high
priest, apparently to de-scribe and contrast
Jesus priesthood with all who had gone before
Him. So ? ? ?
14
Based on this acceptable boldness, this great
priest, and everything else he had written about
so far, Paul launched into a series of
exhortations concerning their faith (v. 22
chap. 11), hope (v. 23 chap. 12), and love (vv.
24-25 chap. 13). (Cf. 1 Cor. 1313.)
15
let us draw near with a true heart in full
assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled
from an evil con-science and our bodies washed
with pure water.
Hebrews 1022 ?
16
let us draw near with a true heart in full
assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled
from an evil con-science and our bodies washed
with pure water.
Paul is arguing from logic i.e., since we had
the faith or bold-ness to enter into Gods
presence (become Christians) in the first place,
and because we have the Messiah as our great
priest, we should likewise do this (v. 22), that
(v. 23), and the other (vv. 24-25).
17
The idea of drawing near to God here corresponds
to the great priest (v. 21), indicating how they
could or why they should draw near to God. The
phrase full assurance of faith fitsthe idea of
boldness (v. 19) i.e., they were being provoked
to draw near to God via the springboard of
confidence in the completed work of Christ.
18
let us draw near with a true heart in full
assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled
from an evil con-science and our bodies washed
with pure water.
Why do I say this means to draw near to God?
Because this context is parallel to 414-16 ?
? ?
19
Seeing that we have a great high priest Jesus
, let us hold fast our confession. Let us
therefore come boldly to the throne of grace,
that we may obtain mercy and find grace to help
in the time of need.
20
let us draw near with a true heart in full
assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled
from an evil con-science and our bodies washed
with pure water.
The main point is to draw near, not draw back
(cf. v. 39).
21
let us draw near with a true heart in full
assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled
from an evil con-science and our bodies washed
with pure water.
Remembering that Paul was writing to Christians
here(v. 19), the idea of drawing near with a
true heart corres-ponds to John 424 where Jesus
said that Gods people must worship Him in spirit
and truth.
22
let us draw near with a true heart in full
assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled
from an evil con-science and our bodies washed
with pure water.
This clause expands on verses 19-20. In other
words ? ?
23
let us draw near with a true heart in full
assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled
from an evil con-science and our bodies washed
with pure water.
Read the clause Having, etc. is how they
entered into the presence of God by the blood of
Jesus (v. 19). And
24
let us draw near with a true heart in full
assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled
from an evil con-science and our bodies washed
with pure water.
Read the clause Having, etc. is what occurred
when they chose that freshly-slain and living way
that Jesus consecrated (v. 20).
25
let us draw near with a true heart in full
assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled
from an evil con-science and our bodies washed
with pure water.
This refers not to water, but to the blood of
Christ i.e., just as priests sprin-kled blood on
things to purify them (913 22), so Christs
blood purifies the conscience now (914).
26
let us draw near with a true heart in full
assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled
from an evil con-science and our bodies washed
with pure water.
This refers not to a wicked conscience, but
to a consci-ousness of evil/sin.
27
let us draw near with a true heart in full
assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled
from an evil con-science and our bodies washed
with pure water.
This refers to un-mixed water in the OT the
water used for purification was mixed with ashes
(913 Num. 191-10), while such is not
necessary in NT baptism. So ? ?
28
Just as the OT priest had to go through various
washings and apply blood on the Day of Atonement
(Lev. 16), and just as Jesus shed water and blood
on the cross (John 1934), so it takes both water
and blood to reconcile (put at-one) a person
today, rendering him a Christian, a person
belonging to God in body and spirit (1 Cor.
620) as Jesus said, Blessed are the pure in
heart, for they shall see God (Mat. 58).
29
Let us hold fast the confession of our hope
without wavering, for He who promised is faithful.
Hebrews 1023 ?
30
Let us hold fast the confession of our hope
without wavering, for He who promised is faithful.
While the last verse speaks of what God does,
this verse speaks of what man is expected to do
hold fast.
31
Let us hold fast the confession of our hope
without wavering, for He who promised is faithful.
Its interesting that after alluding to faith and
baptism, Paul also brought up the concept of
confession obvious-ly this refers to their
confession of Jesus as the promised Messiah who
would make all things new.
32
Let us hold fast the confession of our hope
without wavering, for He who promised is faithful.
This is from a term meaning to lean backwards,
thus, since hope is always ahead, they needed to
lean or press for-ward instead of backward (cf.
v. 39) the point is that if they went back to
the Old Law, theyd be forsaking their previous
confession of the Messiah and His mission.
33
Let us hold fast the confession of our hope
without wavering, for He who promised is faithful.
Perhaps writing to some of the very people who
had left Christ because they lost hope in His
com-ing, perhaps even people who were leading
others away, Peter wrote, The Lord is not slack
concerning His pro-mise (2 Pet. 39).
34
Let us consider one another in order to stir up
love and good works, not forsaking the
as-sembling of our-selves together, as is the
manner of some, but exhort-ing one another, and
so much more as you see the day approaching.
Hebrews 1024-25 ? ? ?
Adam Clarkes comments are very much worth
consid-ering on these two verses.
35
Let us consider one another in order to stir up
love and good works, not forsaking the
as-sembling of our-selves together, as is the
manner of some, but exhort-ing one another, and
so much more as you see the day approaching.
This is from a word that meant to clearly
perceive or fully un-derstand i.e., the best way
for them to help ward off apostasy for
them-selves and others was to give much serious
thought to each ones individu-al circumstances,
tendencies, abilities, and so on. And ?
36
Let us consider one another in order to stir up
love and good works, not forsaking the
as-sembling of our-selves together, as is the
manner of some, but exhort-ing one another, and
so much more as you see the day approaching.
To excite or incite love and good works would be
the best way to prevent apostasy. Why? Be-cause
theyd keep their minds off them- selves and
their own problems by helping others in their
vari-ous situations.
37
Let us consider one another in order to stir up
love and good works, not forsaking the
as-sembling of our-selves together, as is the
manner of some, but exhort-ing one another, and
so much more as you see the day approaching.
This means not giv-ing up on their gath-ering
together. If this refers to gath-erings (plural)
for worship, then dont abandon them if it
refers to their gath-ering together (singular) at
Christs coming, then dont give up on it.
Cf. 2 Pet. 33ff. Also note that the only other
place where this phrase is used is in 2 The. 21
where Paul was writing about the AD 70 coming of
Christ.
38
Let us consider one another in order to stir up
love and good works, not forsaking the
as-sembling of our-selves together, as is the
manner of some, but exhort-ing one another, and
so much more as you see the day approaching.
Note to Self Based on 2 The. 21, could Paul
have been referring to a custom of their members
in general forsaking their confession and
hope? I.e., could this be saying that by
apostatizing they were for-saking the AD
gathering (singular in Greek) of the saints,
not gather-ings for worship? And wouldnt the
day approachingAD 70perfectly correspond with
the assembling of ourselves together this way?
39
Let us consider one another in order to stir up
love and good works, not forsaking the
as-sembling of our-selves together, as is the
manner of some, but exhort-ing one another, and
so much more as you see the day approaching.
This phrase is what would clinch the meaning of
the pre-vious clause if it were unmistakable in
its meaning. In other words ? ?
40
If Paul had left no doubt that he was referring
to the habit of individuals, then thered be
little or no doubt that the assembling is an
allusion to gath-ering for worship. On the other
hand, if Paul had left no doubt that he was
referring to what had come to be the custom of
the Hebrews in generaltheir deserting Christ one
by one, then thered be little or no doubt that
the assembling would be an allusion to the
gathering at Christs coming.
41
Whatever the case may be, theres an interesting
question which should be asked if, as most
believe, Paul was referring to the gatherings for
wor-ship If they were instructed to not forsake
their assemblies, even though under acute
persecution, what does God think of those who
abandon assem- blies today for a much lesser
reason?
42
Let us consider one another in order to stir up
love and good works, not forsaking the
as-sembling of our-selves together, as is the
manner of some, but exhort-ing one another, and
so much more as you see the day approaching.
This is from a term which means to mo-tivate
someone by whatever means necessary, whether it
be comforting, in-structing, warning, or even
rebuking just about anything that would inspire
a person to move in the right direction. Related
to verse 23, what one needs will be different
from what another needs.
43
Let us consider one another in order to stir up
love and good works, not forsaking the
as-sembling of our-selves together, as is the
manner of some, but exhort-ing one another, and
so much more as you see the day approaching.
Whatever this day is, it must be in harmony with
the following criteria
44
1. It must fit the context. 2. Due to the
definite article the, it must have already
been alluded to. 3. It must have been a day
common to all of them. 4. It must have been
the sort of a day that would cause them to
be more diligent in exhortation the closer
it came. So ?
? ?
45
What day would correspond to all of this
criteria? The day of their deaths? No. The first
day of the week? No. An end-of-time judgment day?
No. The only appropriate answer is the day of the
Lord in AD 70 (cf. 813, 928b, 1013, 27,
37-38 also Mat. 2415 33).
After all ? ? ?
46
Not only did this day alleviate Christian
persecution, but it also completely removed any
vestiges of the old cove-nant of sin and death so
that the new covenant or the kingdom of
righteous-ness and life could appear in all its
fullness and glory.
47
For if we sin will-fully after we have received
the know- ledge of the truth, there no longer
re-mains a sacrifice for sins, but a cer-tain
fearful expec- tation of judgment fiery
indignation which will devour the adversaries.
Hebrews 1026-27 ? ? ?
48
For if we sin will-fully after we have received
the know- ledge of the truth, there no longer
re-mains a sacrifice for sins, but a cer-tain
fearful expec- tation of judgment fiery
indignation which will devour the adversaries.
I believe this word is based on the en-tirety of
the previous paragraph where Paul spoke of what
they should do in-stead of deserting Christ,
they should draw near to God by holding fast to
their first love and by keeping each other
motivated in that direction.
49
For if we sin will-fully after we have received
the know- ledge of the truth, there no longer
re-mains a sacrifice for sins, but a cer-tain
fearful expec- tation of judgment fiery
indignation which will devour the adversaries.
This is to sin know-ing full well what one is
doing it isnt being overtaken in a fault or
committing a sin in ignorance its deliberate
per-sistency in a sin, here, specifically, the
sin of apostasy or perhaps even apostatizing
since the word sin is in the present tense.
50
For if we sin will-fully after we have received
the know- ledge of the truth, there no longer
re-mains a sacrifice for sins, but a cer-tain
fearful expec- tation of judgment fiery
indignation which will devour the adversaries.
This is from a term for profuse or com-plete
knowledge, not little or partial knowledge,
corres-ponding perfectly with the definition of
to sin willfully.
51
For if we sin will-fully after we have received
the know- ledge of the truth, there no longer
re-mains a sacrifice for sins, but a cer-tain
fearful expec- tation of judgment fiery
indignation which will devour the adversaries.
Notice that theres no definite article the
before judg-ment here as if Paul were writing
about an end-of-time judg- ment of all who have
ever lived on Earth. Rather ? ? ?
52
For if we sin will-fully after we have received
the know- ledge of the truth, there no longer
re-mains a sacrifice for sins, but a cer-tain
fearful expec- tation of judgment fiery
indignation which will devour the adversaries.
As we discussed in 928b, this has re-ference to
Gods AD 70 judgment on the rejecting Jews
(cor-responding with the day of v. 25b). In
fact ? ? ?
53
For if we sin will-fully after we have received
the know- ledge of the truth, there no longer
re-mains a sacrifice for sins, but a cer-tain
fearful expec- tation of judgment fiery
indignation which will devour the adversaries.
Verse 27 is obviously a quote of Zep. 118
concerning Jerusa-lems demise, espe-cially when
we note that the original word for indignation
can be translated as jealousy ? ? ?
54
Neither their silver nor their gold shall be able
to deliver them in the day of the Lords wrath
but the whole land shall be devoured by the fire
of His jealousy, for He will make a speedy
riddance of all those who dwell in the land (Zep.
118).
55
For if we sin will-fully after we have received
the know- ledge of the truth, there no longer
re-mains a sacrifice for sins, but a cer-tain
fearful expec- tation of judgment fiery
indignation which will devour the adversaries.
As is used ten other times in Hebrews, this
phrase is from the Greek word mello which means
about to or on the verge of occurring, making it
more obvious that Paul was referring to the
demise of Judaism in AD 70.
56
For if we sin will-fully after we have received
the know- ledge of the truth, there no longer
re-mains a sacrifice for sins, but a cer-tain
fearful expec- tation of judgment fiery
indignation which will devour the adversaries.
This doesnt refer to a literal fire, but to
intensity such as when we say, Fred has a fiery
temper.
57
For if we sin will-fully after we have received
the know- ledge of the truth, there no longer
re-mains a sacrifice for sins, but a cer-tain
fearful expec- tation of judgment fiery
indignation which will devour the adversaries.
This means to eat up, continuing the figure of
fire i.e., just as a literal fire eats up
practically everything in its path, so the wrath
of God would anni-hilate practically everything
Jewish.
58
For if we sin will-fully after we have received
the know- ledge of the truth, there no longer
re-mains a sacrifice for sins, but a cer-tain
fearful expec- tation of judgment fiery
indignation which will devour the adversaries.
Notice this (like ene-mies in 113 1013) is
plural, not refer-ring to Satan alone (as weve
likely heard when people speak on Revelation),
but (as mentioned before) pri-marily to the
Jewish rejecters of Gods Messiah. So ? ?
59
Since they knew full well what was right, Paul
was being sure they under-stood the consequence
of deserting Christ, especially at this point in
time. They would be forsaking the only
ac-ceptable sacrifice capable of reconciling them
to their God, and the only thing theyd have to
look forward to was the same condemnation (if not
worse, vv. 28ff) that their rejecting Jewish
brethren would receive.
60
They needed to choose who theyd be more afraid
of those who could throw sticks and stones at
them or He who could destroy both body and soul
in Hell (Mat. 1028).
61
Anyone who has rejected Moses Law dies without
mercy on the testi-mony of two or three witnesses.
Hebrews 1028 ?
62
Anyone who has rejected Moses Law dies without
mercy on the testi-mony of two or three witnesses.
I.e., if Moses had the right to attach the
sentence of death to apostasy from his inferior
law (forsak-ing Yahweh for other gods, Deu.
136-11 172-7), how much more of a right does
God have to attach such a sentence to apostasy
from His superior law (forsak-ing His Son for
Moses)?
63
Anyone who has rejected Moses Law dies without
mercy on the testi-mony of two or three witnesses.
Notice the present tense here (dies), again
indicating that the Law was still considered in
effect in AD 63.
64
Of how much worse punishment do you suppose will
he be thought worthy who has trampled the Son of
God underfoot, counted the blood of the covenant
by which he was sanc- tified a common thing, and
insulted the Spirit of grace.
Hebrews 1029 ?
65
Of how much worse punishment do you suppose will
he be thought worthy who has trampled the Son of
God underfoot, counted the blood of the covenant
by which he was sanc- tified a common thing, and
insulted the Spirit of grace.
To trample Jesus underfoot (as pigs trample
pearls under-foot, Mat. 76) meant to treat Him
with the same contempt as those who spat on Him,
stripped Him, slapped Him, whipped Him, and
finally crucified Him (cf. 1 Cor. 1127).
66
Of how much worse punishment do you suppose will
he be thought worthy who has trampled the Son of
God underfoot, counted the blood of the covenant
by which he was sanc- tified a common thing, and
insulted the Spirit of grace.
Corresponding to knowledge earlier, counted here
refers to a conscious judg-ment resting on a
deliberate weighing of the facts, imply-ing an
intentional rejection of Christs sacrifice and
essen-tially saying that His blood is no more
significant than the blood of the thieves
crucified with Him.
67
Of how much worse punishment do you suppose will
he be thought worthy who has trampled the Son of
God underfoot, counted the blood of the covenant
by which he was sanc- tified a common thing, and
insulted the Spirit of grace.
This is He who gave miraculous gifts to them as
perfect evi-dence of Christs claims and His new
covenant. Notice ?
68
The Parallel passage of Hebrews 64-6 say, It is
impossible for those who were once enlightened,
and have tasted the heavenly gift, and have
become partak-ers of the Holy Spirit, and have
tasted the good Word of God and the powers of the
age to come, if they shall fall away, to renew
them again to repentance, since they crucify
again for themselves the Son of God and put Him
to an open shame.
So ? ? ?
69
Of how much worse punishment do you suppose will
he be thought worthy who has trampled the Son of
God underfoot, counted the blood of the covenant
by which he was sanc- tified a common thing, and
insulted the Spirit of grace.
To turn back to Moses and his cove-nant was to
blas-pheme the Spiritto commit the unfor-givable
sin. Why? Because apart from Christ, sin cannot
be forgiven!
70
For we know Him who said, Venge-ance is Mine, I
will repay, says the Lord. And again, The Lord
will judge His people. Its a fearful thing to
fall into the hands of the living God.
Hebrews 1030-31 ? ? ?
71
For we know Him who said, Venge-ance is Mine, I
will repay, says the Lord. And again, The Lord
will judge His people. Its a fearful thing to
fall into the hands of the living God.
Paul quoted this (Deu. 3235) in Rom. 1219 where
he was teaching not to take revenge on enemies,
for God claims that right i.e., Paul was
implying that God takes revenge, but it isnt so
much for Himself as for His people. However here
? ? ?
72
For we know Him who said, Venge-ance is Mine, I
will repay, says the Lord. And again, The Lord
will judge His people. Its a fearful thing to
fall into the hands of the living God.
He added the fact that even if they were His
children who decided to re-ject Him, His ways,
and His people, they would still have to answer
to Him.
73
For we know Him who said, Venge-ance is Mine, I
will repay, says the Lord. And again, The Lord
will judge His people. Its a fearful thing to
fall into the hands of the living God.
This is used in the Bible in opposition to (dead)
idols, cor-responding perfectly to the usual
manner of apostasy in the OTleaving Yahweh for
idols (cf. v. 28).
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